Re: Digestible Hooks?


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Posted by JboroBrown on September 16, 1997 at 22:02:04:

In Reply to: Re: Digestible Hooks? posted by J. Webb on September 16, 1997 at 01:22:34:


> > An interesting story about the hook protruding from the fish. However, I'd always been told that if you "gut hook" a fish if you'll leave the hook in that the hook will eventually disolve from the fish's natural digestive system and you'll do far less damage than trying to pull the hook free. Now I'm curious as to how true that really is.

> The best information I have seen recently was in an article in Field & Stream as I recall. Apparently there was a study to see the effects of leaving a hook in the gullet/throat of a fish verses rmoving it. The study, as I recall showed that a hook in the throat could/did have an adverse effect on the fish. Of course, if a fish is intent on swallowing a hook(much less likely with artificials) removal would likley be disatrous. The factor that was most influential on the survivablilty of the fish was the time out of the water. Keeping a fish, especially a weakened fish out of water for as little as one minute could bring about death within a 24 hour(??? don't recall exactly) time period. From my meomory, removal of all hooks possible and immediate return to the water and reviving is the best practice.

> Of course the fish I caught is an example of the fact that a fish can overcome stiff odds. If I can find the article, I will post date/publication/page. I definitely remember that I was impressed with the information but concerned that it could not be more widely spread. I have been much more careful when trying to get a photo of a tired fish.

> Hope this helps!

> Are we fishing yet?

> J. Webb

J. Webb:

I don't think that what you have encountered is that unusual for an otherwise healthy fish. Two years ago I was fishing near Ponce Inlet by New Smyrna Beach, and caught a 39" redfish that had the eye end of a hook protruding from it's vent. The hook was seriously corroded and was removed easily. This fish was very strong, with no indication of ill effects. In fact, two days later, my fishin' buddy caught him again (very unique spots, only on one side).

This fish taught me two lessons; 1- catch & release works for all species, 2- I no longer use plated hooks.



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