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Day trip to the park

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  • Day trip to the park

    @streamside Sam was the one who first told me about fishing in the park over a year ago, I'm pretty sure he referred to it as the holy grail and made comments like "you probably won't come back, become a mountain man hopping between backcountry campsites for the rest of your years"
    Well I haven't moved yet, but I sure do like fishing those streams and yesterday he and I took a day trip. We hadn't actually fished together in the park. Early start, decently long drive, but no further than some remote North Georgia watersheds, and we were after it. The temp was low 30's when we arrived and we knew that the area has received decent rains (1-2 inches) so we took our time and then hiked in a good way, mile or more before hopping in the creek.

    @Streamsidesam was tossing his euro rig with lethal accuracy, as usual. I was tenkara-ing looking as clumsy as I always do. The rocks were super slippery and I think both of us fell at least once, I fell three times, but only once pay my waist. Brrrr

    The morning was slow. I think we each caught one fish, maybe two before lunch. Then we stopped for peanut butter and jelly time on a bank. Across from the bank there was this mouthwatering looking run with some over hang and deep, moderately swift water, I approached with stealth



    I'm not sure if it was the first cast, but shortly after working up that run and catching a few small browns



    A large, dark, spotted creature rose to my dry. I heard @sam in the background echo, out loud, what was running through my head, "Oooooohhhhh!" He swiped the dry, but didn't eat it and in the throes of truing to set the hook I landed in the trees. He helped me unhook my flies. As I was retying them to my tippet I suggested he go get that fish, but he respectfully declined "that's your fish, the fish of the day right there."
    So I made my way slightly downstream and began dropping delicate casts in the area, hoping no smaller fish would hit it and mess the pool up. Then I saw the shadow, swirling, chasing my nymph, but not committing. I realized he had moved slightly downstream from his holding lie so I casted upstream enough that he might see the dry perfectly hit the water and be able to calculate his attack. (Actually thinking like a fish, I need help). My plan worked and my rod was bent. He darted for the current, then to the bottom, but eventually (7 seconds or so feels like a life time with a decent fish) I was able to land him. He was between 12-14, which compared to the other fish we caught yesterday was a monster. That being said, I've been told this watershed holds several browns in the 20" size, but we didn't see any of those and I'm pretty sure they have snapped the tenkara right in half.



    I think we each caught between a dozen to a dozen and a half. It was a great day with great scenery.







    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  • #2
    honestly knowing where you were in the park, and looking at that bigger brown, wouldn't be surprised if it was a stocker that made its way up.
    Resident Tenkara Nerd

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    • #3
      That's my kinds small stream right there!
      http://www.bigtflyfishing.com

      [

      Use Promo Code NGTO for 5% off

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      • #4
        Originally posted by iso1600 View Post
        honestly knowing where you were in the park, and looking at that bigger brown, wouldn't be surprised if it was a stocker that made its way up.
        We were pretty far in. I am not sure of the stocking schedule but you could be correct, I guess. Either way, it didn't fight like a stocker, that's for sure. Sure he would've tasted good on the grill, too.

        Originally posted by Big T View Post
        That's my kinds small stream right there!
        bahahaha! Yeah, the "small" streams in the smokies are far from small. On my first trip I though there had been some sort of hurricane rain storm, but was then reassured these streams are larger and have heavier flows. Now, if you get off the beaten path and move deeper in the wilderness there is no doubt you will end up on a smaller creek that looks like a more typical north georgia small stream... but generally there are areas that are more open for casting.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by splatek16 View Post
          bahahaha! Yeah, the "small" streams in the smokies are far from small. On my first trip I though there had been some sort of hurricane rain storm, but was then reassured these streams are larger and have heavier flows. Now, if you get off the beaten path and move deeper in the wilderness there is no doubt you will end up on a smaller creek that looks like a more typical north georgia small stream... but generally there are areas that are more open for casting.
          I would say the open enough for casting aspect is the rule there; not the exception. I did my internship with the GRSM fisheries crew where we worked all summer at restoring the native specs back to their historical distributions and separated the natives from non-natives. Out of all of the dozens of creeks we worked on, I don't recall ever seeing one even remotely as small and overgrown as the typical GA creek where you find the natives.
          "Everyone blows their money on stupid stuff. Just choose which stupid you want and roll with it."


          Mark

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          • #6
            The Park

            Living where you do in Sewanee you are already an hour closer that someone in say, Marietta. The road going up has gotten much better over the years as well and so long as you don't speed in Mountain City, it's not that bad a drive. Especially if you have a companion. Of course you have to be strong and avoid temptation! Along the way you go by Sylva and the Tuck and Bryson City with Deep Creek and the "other" Tuck is just two exits further.

            Small streams are a comparative description. If you are on the coast, a small stream might be only 700 yards wide or in New Mexico, their notion of a small stream is maybe 17 inches wide!

            Come on up anytime and spend some of that good old Georgia cash with us! --jk--

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            • #7
              Man, this is making me want to head up there and camp and fish and eat some stream side smoked trout sometime soon. We haven't had a good report from the park in some time now and this is a great one.

              That brown on the dry is, indeed, the fish of the day. Great work on going back after him. That's a pretty stretch y'all were in. Quieter too. Thanks for the report!
              I'm so old I remember when men wore tattoos and women wore earrings.
              -Lefty Kreh

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              • #8
                It was great to fish a new GSMNP stream. This one is wide with one beautiful run after another. Tons of holding water, depth, bubble lines, and seams. FULL of wild fish, both bows and browns. It WAS tough maneuvering into position, as the full, fast flow and slippery rocks meant we typically couldn't cross to the far side, and generally had to hug the banks. Beautiful, clear, sunny day, and the temperature rose 30 degrees while we were fishing. Awesome day of exploring and fishing.
                "A free people ought not only to be armed, but disciplined..." George Washington

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                • #9
                  Great report guys. Glad it was a fun day, I enjoyed reading about it.
                  THEY TRIED TO BURY US BUT THEY DID NOT KNOW WE WERE SEEDS

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                  • #10
                    Beautiful stuff, makes me jealous! Definitely makes me want to throw a dry dropper through those runs

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by splatek16 View Post
                      We were pretty far in. I am not sure of the stocking schedule but you could be correct, I guess. Either way, it didn't fight like a stocker, that's for sure. Sure he would've tasted good on the grill, too.
                      I caught a giant stocker brookie pretty far up (i'll show you where) and a decent stocker 'bow quite far up the 'Luftee over on the Smokemont side.
                      I think I read somewhere that the Tuckasegee between Bryson and Dillard(?) is the most stocked stretch of river at least this side of the country. They put SO many trout in there, the schedule doesn't really matter lol.
                      Resident Tenkara Nerd

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