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Lake Lanier filling - at least for now

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  • Lake Lanier filling - at least for now

    Good to see Lake Lanier collecting some water:

    Last edited by Trout8myfly; 02-08-18, 11:33 AM.
    "What's his offense?"
    "Groping for trouts in a peculiar river."
    ― William Shakespeare, Measure for Measure

  • #2
    Praying to the fishy gods this summer doesn't get torched like last year.

    Summer bite 17 sucked in comparison to 16
    I like em big fat and sloppy.

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    • #3
      Looks like the Headwaters got pounded again today!!! Could be pretty epic!!! We need more tactical rain deployment up north.
      #JBNavy

      "Everyday is a new life to a wise man."
      -Chinese Proverb

      At sunrise everything is luminous but not clear.
      -Norman Maclean

      "We are what we hunt."
      -PH

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      • #4
        Careful what you ask for. Although it has a ways to go to reach 1071, if it does so early in a wet spring, then you Hooch fishermen are looking at possibly more frequent and longer water releases from Lanier than you have gotten used to. Having too much water in Lanier has its own negative consequences. It is near impossible to manage lake levels to hit that sweet spot where most everyone is happy.
        Last edited by natureman; 02-07-18, 02:45 PM.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by natureman View Post
          Careful what you ask for. Although it has a ways to go to reach 1071, if it does so early in a wet spring, then you Hooch fishermen are looking at significantly more water releases from Lanier than you have gotten used to.
          Yes, it's good news, bad news. The good news is that a full Lake Lanier gnerally means the headwaters and feeder streams are doing well. The bad news...here comes the flood!
          "What's his offense?"
          "Groping for trouts in a peculiar river."
          ― William Shakespeare, Measure for Measure

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          • #6
            Originally posted by natureman View Post
            Careful what you ask for. Although it has a ways to go to reach 1071, if it does so early in a wet spring, then you Hooch fishermen are looking at possibly more frequent and longer water releases from Lanier than you have gotten used to. Having too much water in Lanier has its own negative consequences. It is near impossible to manage lake levels to hit that sweet spot where most everyone is happy.
            Ill take too much water as good news all around. Maybe a few extra releases or a couple weeks of the Hooch ripping will remove some of the silt and extra weeds that have grown in south of Morgan Falls.
            I am officially upgrading Gatorbyte from "fly in my ointment" to "thorn in my side". If he happens to elevate himself to "pain in my a$$" I'm gonna blame it on RScott.

            Want to Help Ease DNR's Budget Woes? Buy a TU license Plate!


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            • #7
              Originally posted by natureman View Post
              Careful what you ask for. Although it has a ways to go to reach 1071, if it does so early in a wet spring, then you Hooch fishermen are looking at possibly more frequent and longer water releases from Lanier than you have gotten used to. Having too much water in Lanier has its own negative consequences. It is near impossible to manage lake levels to hit that sweet spot where most everyone is happy.
              That's actually the whole reason I am happy.

              Big, long releases of gin clear water in the summer grows the trout better.

              Finished at .66 feet up for the day yesterday.
              I like em big fat and sloppy.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by browniez View Post
                That's actually the whole reason I am happy.

                Big, long releases of gin clear water in the summer grows the trout better.

                Finished at .66 feet up for the day yesterday.
                On the down side when we go from a drought year to an over abundance of rain the is a correlation between increased water releases and the number of fatalities on the river. Mainly due to those unfamiliar with river conditions and the fact that it can change year to year. Also the sheer number of people recreating on the river and many for the first time due to rapid population growth. River safety is something the Corps has always wrestled with and has tried every information conduit available with limited success. Closer to the dam they are effective due to having a presence there but, further downstream not so much.
                Last edited by natureman; 02-08-18, 10:59 AM.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by natureman View Post
                  On the down side when we go from a drought year to an over abundance of rain the is a correlation between increased water releases and the number of fatalities on the river. Mainly due to those unfamiliar with river conditions and the fact that it can change year to year. Also the sheer number of people recreating on the river and many for the first time due to rapid population growth. River safety is something the Corps has always wrestled with and has tried every information conduit available with limited success. Closer to the dam they are effective due to having a presence there but, further downstream not so much.

                  Agreed!

                  You can't fix stupid though. I can't put a kid drowning after jumping off a 40 foot bridge into a 13k cfs flow on the Corps. Society seems too though.

                  I've noticed the people who get in trouble on high flows seem to think they aren't dangerous.

                  They are exceedingly dangerous, and you have to respect that and understand that in order to be safe.

                  Personally I probably use the river at high flows more than anyone, and with proper precautions I do not feel any less safe on the river.

                  This is the only tailwater I've ever fished where high flows are so taboo. Most places they rarely fish for browns unless they're turning water.
                  I like em big fat and sloppy.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by browniez View Post
                    Agreed!

                    You can't fix stupid though. I can't put a kid drowning after jumping off a 40 foot bridge into a 13k cfs flow on the Corps. Society seems too though.

                    I've noticed the people who get in trouble on high flows seem to think they aren't dangerous.

                    They are exceedingly dangerous, and you have to respect that and understand that in order to be safe.

                    Personally I probably use the river at high flows more than anyone, and with proper precautions I do not feel any less safe on the river.

                    This is the only tailwater I've ever fished where high flows are so taboo. Most places they rarely fish for browns unless they're turning water.
                    Yea, I knew you were a very experienced high flow guy and know what it takes to keep safe. Back in my park ranger days I did a lot of high flow rescue boating from the dam down to 20. No matter how many times I got on the water the initial rise was a real hair raiser. Currents are all over the place with no apparent rhyme or reason and much more so with 3 units going wide open. After it settles down some it is more manageable.
                    Last edited by natureman; 02-08-18, 11:56 AM.

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                    • #11
                      Lake is now up almost 2.25ft in the past five days.
                      #JBNavy

                      "Everyday is a new life to a wise man."
                      -Chinese Proverb

                      At sunrise everything is luminous but not clear.
                      -Norman Maclean

                      "We are what we hunt."
                      -PH

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Looks like some significant water releases over the next couple of weeks. Look at the red dots in this chart.

                        http://water.sam.usace.army.mil/acfcharts.pdf

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                        • #13
                          The Corps has been releasing every day since about Feb. 20. And the lake is still a whisker under full pool, so I think it's fair to conclude that North Georgia has gotten its fair share of rainfall.

                          "What's his offense?"
                          "Groping for trouts in a peculiar river."
                          ― William Shakespeare, Measure for Measure

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