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My first attempt at fly fishing the Hooch.

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  • #16
    As others have said, practice practice and more practice. I would also highly recommend ordering this book and reading it cover to cover. Itís what I did and taught myself to fly fish

    https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/14930...2XL&ref=plSrch

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    • #17
      Some tips I've got when starting out, learned them all the hard way haha.

      1. Get comfortable with throwing one fly first. I wouldn't attach two flies as it significantly increases your chances of tangling up. The pro to this other than less tangles is that you can actually achieve a better drift as sometimes the two flies get caught in different currents and cause an unnatural drift for both.

      2. Don't attach split shot unless needed. Try and have all the weight incorporated in the fly itself, I am guessing you haven't gotten into fly tying yet (If you stick with fly fishing you probably will! Just don't get convinced that you'll end up saving money haha), so try and buy some tungsten beaded flies at the fly shops. The split show will create a hinge in your cast and if using a indicator, create way more tangles. If you're not getting deep enough, take some time and practice the Tuck cast along with your regular cast.

      3. If you notice your flies not landing the correct distance from your fly line or landing awkwardly (especially with an indicator) chances are you have a tangle. Reel in your line slowly and try and fix the tangle before your next cast as it will be infinitely easier to untangle then rather than casting it and creating more tangles/tightening the tangled knots. Basically, if you notice a tangle, don't be tempted to cast out there again and take the time to fix it then and there as it will be much easier.

      4. Practice your knots to get more productive time out on the water. Adding new line, tying on flies, or replacing leaders are all things that can sap out more time than you think. If you can tie the few knots that you need quickly and effectively, you'll have more fishing time out there. I know you were a spin fisherman so I am sure you have working knowledge of most of these knots and can tie them fairly quickly, but that thin tippet can make it a bit tougher... Some knots for fly fishing I'd suggest to know are the clinch/improved clinch (nymphs or dries to tippet) , blood knot (leader to leader) , non slip loop (streamers) , perfection loop (leader to fly line), and triple surgeons ( tippet to tippet, cut one tag and keep the other to add a second fly).

      5. Cast within your comfort zone first, no need to make hero casts unless you can't physically wade within range. It's better to take some time to walk up and make an accurate cast to a good run where you can achieve a better drift than taking your chances with a long cast that may tangle and have too much line out to get a good drift.

      Those are some of the main tips I wish I knew when I started fly fishing... I hope they helped! Best of luck and looking forward to hearing about your future success.
      Last edited by Sighter; 02-09-18, 03:59 PM.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by Lumis View Post
        I was fishing from the shore so i was trying to get "ultralight with a spinner" distance. Probably not a good idea.

        The tangles appeared from attempting to swing the line for too long (like a lasso), and letting it catch itself (and me not stopping to fix it before it got worse). I had line wrapped around my shoulders a few times.

        I sure do look forward to this lesson

        Sounds like my everyday fly fling...I've been trying for 50+years...

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        • #19
          Originally posted by Sighter View Post
          Those are some of the main tips I wish I knew when I started fly fishing... I hope they helped! Best of luck and looking forward to hearing about your future success.
          Appreciate it! I'll keep them all in mind.

          Originally posted by LureheadEd View Post
          Sounds like my everyday fly fling...I've been trying for 50+years...
          I'll have to stay away from you. Can't be very good luck

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          • #20
            Hey... I think it took me at least five outings before I actually caught fish with my fly rod. There is an art to it and I think that's why it's so rewarding when you get it honed in also.

            The mistake i made was that I tried to learn everything inn my own. Stick with someone who had been doing it for a little while and you will learn it faster.
            Hi my name is Charles and I'm a fishaholic.

            Some days I'm the hook and some days I'm the fish.

            Instagram @charles_the_toothsmith

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            • #21
              @lumis if you're interested, @Streamsidesam and I could take you out sometime and show you a few things, try and get you on some trouts.
              You also might wanna try Smith creek.
              That is a fun place


              Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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              • #22
                Originally posted by splatek16 View Post
                @lumis if you're interested, @Streamsidesam and I could take you out sometime and show you a few things, try and get you on some trouts.
                You also might wanna try Smith creek.
                That is a fun place
                +1

                Smith creek, and other similar sized small streams helped me learn basic casting, rigging, trout behavior, and reading water when I first started FF, without having to worry as much about wading. I did a lot of that before moving on to bigger water.
                Last edited by 3-wt; 02-10-18, 08:54 AM.
                "A free people ought not only to be armed, but disciplined..." George Washington

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                • #23
                  Like you, I grew up spin fishing in GA and after college I moved to Jackson, WY. I got a job in the camping dept of a well know outdoor store that was primarily a fly shop. I was hell bent on learning to fly fish. I picked the brains of the guides and fly guys. They taught me to cast, what to use, where to fish, and knots. I had a huge leg up. Then I was ready to actually fish.

                  I fished everyday rain or shine (all day on my days off, or after work in the evenings) for 3 weeks before I caught a trout. It takes time and you'll make every error imaginable. But keep at it. I've barely picked up a spin rod since that summer. I simply prefer the fly.

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                  • #24
                    I've been told that my casting looks like an old lady fighting a swarm of bees with a broomstick.
                    BE DIFFERENT AND MAKE A DIFFERENCE! <

                    Exodus 29:18
                    Then burn the entire ram on the altar. It is a burnt offering to the LORD, a pleasing aroma, a food offering presented to the LORD. God loves BBQ!

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by fishnpreacher View Post
                      I've been told that my casting looks like an old lady fighting a swarm of bees with a broomstick.
                      So you use a spey cast...
                      -skunked

                      Warning: all posts should be assumed to contain sarcasm and misinformation unless stated otherwise. The opinions shared are not necessarily those of the poster.

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                      • #26
                        Keep it simple

                        My advice would be to keep it simple. Learn the waterhaul cast (YouTube), use an indicator & 1 fly, forget about all the false casting & how far you can cast, learn to fish close to you and get with someone who has experience (Splatek, SS Sam, etc.) and the learning curve will be much shorter. I also echo the advice on fishing for bream & bass in local ponds. That will increase your confidence & enjoyment. Stay at it, I promise you it will be worth all the hassle & practice.
                        Good luck,
                        Darryl

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                        • #27
                          Well I got my first casting lesson this morning. Learned a few things that i'll have to practice some more. Not a fan of the whole elbow close to my body part, feels awkward

                          I've always wanted to hit up smith creek but I don't know much about it. I do believe there's some rules that apply to it.

                          I'd fish my pond if I knew how to bass fish. I'll have to YouTube that. I appreciate all the advice.

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by I_got_skunked View Post
                            So you use a spey cast...
                            Spey, single haul, double haul, tuck, and roll cast.....all at the same time
                            BE DIFFERENT AND MAKE A DIFFERENCE! <

                            Exodus 29:18
                            Then burn the entire ram on the altar. It is a burnt offering to the LORD, a pleasing aroma, a food offering presented to the LORD. God loves BBQ!

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Casting vs Fishing

                              For what it's worth, focus more on the fishing - it's more fun. But the casting is necessary so here a few tips:

                              - The 'Hootch while holding much potential is one very, very big river. Try some of the smaller streams first, and the DH streams are excellent for this.
                              - Try tying a loop of string around your elbow and attach other end to your belt to help keep your elbow tucked
                              - Get a cheap velcro watch band (no watch needed) and use this around your casting wrist to tuck the rod butt under. This greatly helps keeping your wrist from bending.
                              - Crush your bicep. If your elbow is tucked and your wrist is locked, bring the rod straight back past your ear so you crush your bicep which is the exact precise position to stop your back cast.
                              - When practicing, watch your back cast more than the front cast. If you can keep the line level you are doing great. If it's dropping or shooting straight up into the air, you need to revise things
                              - The benefit of this precision kind of casting is that you can do it all day long while the angler extending their arm over their, head and bending their wrist can make a good cast, they cannot do it all day. You can do this more precise cast all day long and not wear out your arm.
                              - Pisgah Chapter TU holds it's annual Fly Fishing School April 28 and 29 in Tryon, NC

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                              • #30
                                Thanks for the tips. I noticed my arm started getting kind of sore when I had my elbow close to my body. Must be something you have to get adjusted to?

                                Tying my elbow down seems like a pretty good idea. I'll definitely look into that. If only it would stop raining

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