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My best day on the hooch (+stream born bow?)

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  • My best day on the hooch (+stream born bow?)

    Got out yesterday evening and had my best numbers day on the hooch yet. I caught 7 or 8 in about 3 hours while tight lining/euro nymphing.
    Guess I'll never be a true "numbers guy" because I lost count after about 5 haha.. I was just having so much fun.

    Last time I was out before that I got 5 in about the same amount of time. I'm feeling pretty good..like effort/time spent over the last few years is starting to "pay off",and like I'm starting to dial things in a bit, at least on the technique of tightlining.

    Sure I'm not having 20+ fish days but...
    I can read water a lot better lately, and just be able to mentally bucket the water I come across into:
    1) where fish are most likely to be
    2) less likely but still may be there, and
    3) probably not worth wasting my time on.

    I have been positioning my self a lot better lately..in terms of lining up how my drift needs to be. I can see/feel when my line and fly land "right" and are in the right spot to set themselves up for a productive drift, vs when they're not.

    Basically, I guess I've developed some "feel"... and man, is that satisfying. It's the best part of learning anything really.
    When you finally get the feel for that snapshot in hockey..

    ...Start to notice the brush of the ball on your tennis racquet strings

    ...Find the sweet spot on your foot for a soccer kick.
    ...Develop that action in your wrist for fast tempo on your hi hats.
    ...Know how much tension to keep on your senko as it fall and wiggles..to still be able to detect the take but not mess up the action.

    Anyway, I hope this brings back some memories for some of you for when you felt things start to "click." For when you started understanding the nuance of what you're trying to do. In fishing or anything else.

    Edited to add: my recent "strides" I think are due largely in part to getting to fish a couple times with several of you on here recently..ericklymore, rich, etc. Don't realize how much you learn standing next to someone watching them slay fish in real time.

    Also, as mentioned in the title, one of the fish I caught yesterday looks to be streamborn or perhaps from the "fingerling stockers". Check it out. I caught one of these a couple months ago too.
    I know some folks on here have been catching them lately too so I wanted to provide my pics. They seem to fight a lot harder than the stockers..anyone else noticed that?

    Sent from my SM-G900V using Tapatalk
    Last edited by orey10m; 07-02-18, 12:22 PM.
    _yero on instagram

  • #2
    Nice man!!!!

    I feels ya on the feels.

    Glove side high bar down is a thing of beauty.
    I like em big fat and sloppy.

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    • #3
      Nice, good feeling. And the learning never ends which is wonderful.
      http://www.bigtflyfishing.com

      Use Promo Code NGTO for 5% off

      Comment


      • #4
        Heck yeah

        And always surround yourself with folks better than your and you're always learning

        Great looking fish


        Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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        • #5
          Originally posted by browniez View Post
          Glove side high bar down is a thing of beauty.
          Yeah buddy, celly time.

          Love the sound of frozen rubber hitting metal.
          @glennmau

          Comment


          • #6
            Great feeling when all the research, and hard work comes together and results in a day that you had..Way to go - guessing things will only get better from now on!
            Tight lines!!

            Doc

            Comment


            • #7
              Great post! I am probably a few months behind you, but had a similar outing at JB yesterday, except my numbers were 3 in the net, and 2 lost on the hook. Still learning to read the water, figure out the flies, and understand how to position the drift, but loving it all. I started with a Hares Ear, with no luck. Moved to a orange/green Wolly Bugger, and they liked that a lot better.

              Thanks again for posting!

              Comment


              • #8
                Congrats on a great day Michael. Browns are worth double too! I intended on hitting the dam as well but made a last minute change of plans and hit JB around the island when I found out they didnít realease that night. Itís been a while and I figured the impending storm would keep most folks away. Iím glad I did. It was one of my better days.

                Originally posted by GT Sailor View Post
                Great post! I am probably a few months behind you, but had a similar outing at JB yesterday, except my numbers were 3 in the net, and 2 lost on the hook. Still learning to read the water, figure out the flies, and understand how to position the drift, but loving it all. I started with a Hares Ear, with no luck. Moved to a orange/green Wolly Bugger, and they liked that a lot better.

                Thanks again for posting!
                Were you fishing the Fulton side around the island? I was wearing a green flannel and talked to quite a few of the anglers out that day. It went through spurts for me. I would get into them then after a few hooked fish it seemed like the whole area was spooked so Iíd move on. I was there from 10-5 and probably circled the island 3 times.
                Fly tying instagram @erikclymore

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                • #9
                  Nice man, the special day when everything begins to connect is memorable. Just keep at it you'll soon have the 20+ fish days on a regular, it takes time on the water and being around the right people always helps like you said.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by erikclymore View Post
                    Were you fishing the Fulton side around the island? I was wearing a green flannel and talked to quite a few of the anglers out that day. It went through spurts for me. I would get into them then after a few hooked fish it seemed like the whole area was spooked so Iíd move on. I was there from 10-5 and probably circled the island 3 times.
                    I started off just above the island for a while on the Gwinnett side. Walked down the east side, and back around the Fulton side. Didn't have much luck there, but saw someone there up along the Gwinnett shore hook a couple. Decided to move up stream on the Fulton side, found a hole, switched flies, and started to catch. Was there 3-6PM, but didn't really catch until after 4:30 or so. I may have seen you, but didn't want to disturb. I was wearing a ball cap and in a tan shirt.

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                    • #11
                      So, I knew it would happen.

                      Once I started a thread like this I figured I'd be setting myself up for some real whoopings by the skunk gods. I come humbled before you now to attest that I have returned to the lowly lands of skunkness.

                      This weekend I fished both days at the dam, taking out newbies to show them how to fly fish. Fished only for about 1.5 hours the first day and 2.5 hours the second.
                      I blame our skunks on:
                      1 ) me focusing on helping them takes away from me being able to focus on my own fishing. (I'm sure the parents out there can relate to this (except splatek..his kid slays the fish on his own now))
                      2) not being out there very long each day

                      Now, to my credit I hooked a few fish each day while tightlining, just couldn't stick the hooksets for some reason. I picked up some pointers on this from Big T yesterday afterwards in the parking lot, so I know some adjustments to employ in the future.

                      Also, to get something productive out of this thread, I do have a question that maybe others can benefit from. What do you recommend is the best way to set up a first time fly fisherman/woman?

                      I had the newbies nymphing with an 8ft 5 wt with a thingamabobber indicator, a soft hackle, and either a San Juan or "flashy mid-sized bead head nymph of various colors" on the bottom. I didn't spend much time changing flies for them as it's really about them learning technique anyway

                      In my own fly fishing experience I unfortunately "moved on" from traditional indicator nymphing in pursuit of higher numbers with tightline rigs likely too fast to really have the traditional way down. When I come back to it myself or set someone else up I think the main mistake I make is not having the distance from the indicator to the fly long enough /deep enough. I hear all the time that it's supposed to be "1.5 - 2 times the depth of the water you're fishing"

                      Sent from my SM-G900V using Tapatalk
                      _yero on instagram

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by orey10m View Post
                        1 ) me focusing on helping them takes away from me being able to focus on my own fishing. (I'm sure the parents out there can relate to this (except splatek..his kid slays the fish on his own now))
                        Haha. Spencer is straight fishy dude. He doesn't always slay, but I only post pictures when he does.


                        I had the newbies nymphing with an 8ft 5 wt with a thingamabobber indicator, a soft hackle, and either a San Juan or "flashy mid-sized bead head nymph of various colors" on the bottom. I didn't spend much time changing flies for them as it's really about them learning technique anyway

                        In my own fly fishing experience I unfortunately "moved on" from traditional indicator nymphing in pursuit of higher numbers with tightline rigs likely too fast to really have the traditional way down. When I come back to it myself or set someone else up I think the main mistake I make is not having the distance from the indicator to the fly long enough /deep enough. I hear all the time that it's supposed to be "1.5 - 2 times the depth of the water you're fishing"

                        Sent from my SM-G900V using Tapatalk
                        I will offer the advice and setup I use with Spencer (although I reckon your newbs aren't 7 years old.

                        1) Use a longer rod. I started Spencer with a tenkara rod. I know, folks don't like that. But here's the thing. Long rod means good reach, line off the water and helped teaching about tracking the rod tip with the line/indicator or dry.

                        2) I would avoid dry-drop; too much hassle. Use an indicator like a thingamabobber. Viturally no maintenance. I like the airlock ones that allow you to simply screw them wherever you want on the leader, making depth adjustments very simple.

                        3) use the smallest 'bobber as possible; I think a lot folks use indicators of larger size either out of convenience and/or eyesight, but a bigger indicator means more tension when the fish takes the fly --> resulting in feeling unnatural and the fish spitting the fly. I think it's a textural thing and sometimes a little slack there works. Not much.

                        4) use tungsten weighted flies (not lead, if you can avoid it; i Know a lot of folks aren't going to like that, but it works for us to have flies with the weight). that being said I rarely if ever fish a fly bigger than 16, usually 18-20 with a 2.0-2.4mm Tung bead. I like having two flies, but that's a recipe for tangles, so that's up to you. The good thing about tenkara is that it's a lot like a euro nymph cast, let it drag, water load, cast up and out, drift.

                        5) If you don't have a tenkara rod ($12 bucks on Amazon.com, use smile.amazon.com and make NGTO your beneficiary) then use a long rod or shorter casts so that most if not all the line can be kept off the water. Mending is usually terrible for new anglers, including spencer and me, and keeping a relatively direct connection between the rod tip and the indicator (bobber, yarn, or dry) increases hook sets, IMHO.

                        6) Someone told me that 1.5-2 times the depth argument about the indicator to fly distance when I started or I read that somewhere. It never worked for me. I try to estimate the depth and keep at least one of my flies just off the bottom, or slightly ticking along the bottom.

                        7) if using two flies always put the heavier fly at the bottom or use same weight flies. Having the heavier fly up top and drifting the lighter fly behind does work well for many, but not these boys here. Sure, all your flies are in the strike zone, but do the physics: if the fish hits the trailer fly it now have more points at which the angle of the line/leader has to change to produce an effect on the indicator. By the time you notice something the fish could have spit it already.

                        OK, that's all I got.
                        @BigT, did I do good...?

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by splatek16 View Post
                          Haha. Spencer is straight fishy dude. He doesn't always slay, but I only post pictures when he does.



                          I will offer the advice and setup I use with Spencer (although I reckon your newbs aren't 7 years old.

                          1) Use a longer rod. I started Spencer with a tenkara rod. I know, folks don't like that. But here's the thing. Long rod means good reach, line off the water and helped teaching about tracking the rod tip with the line/indicator or dry.

                          2) I would avoid dry-drop; too much hassle. Use an indicator like a thingamabobber. Viturally no maintenance. I like the airlock ones that allow you to simply screw them wherever you want on the leader, making depth adjustments very simple.

                          3) use the smallest 'bobber as possible; I think a lot folks use indicators of larger size either out of convenience and/or eyesight, but a bigger indicator means more tension when the fish takes the fly --> resulting in feeling unnatural and the fish spitting the fly. I think it's a textural thing and sometimes a little slack there works. Not much.

                          4) use tungsten weighted flies (not lead, if you can avoid it; i Know a lot of folks aren't going to like that, but it works for us to have flies with the weight). that being said I rarely if ever fish a fly bigger than 16, usually 18-20 with a 2.0-2.4mm Tung bead. I like having two flies, but that's a recipe for tangles, so that's up to you. The good thing about tenkara is that it's a lot like a euro nymph cast, let it drag, water load, cast up and out, drift.

                          5) If you don't have a tenkara rod ($12 bucks on Amazon.com, use smile.amazon.com and make NGTO your beneficiary) then use a long rod or shorter casts so that most if not all the line can be kept off the water. Mending is usually terrible for new anglers, including spencer and me, and keeping a relatively direct connection between the rod tip and the indicator (bobber, yarn, or dry) increases hook sets, IMHO.

                          6) Someone told me that 1.5-2 times the depth argument about the indicator to fly distance when I started or I read that somewhere. It never worked for me. I try to estimate the depth and keep at least one of my flies just off the bottom, or slightly ticking along the bottom.

                          7) if using two flies always put the heavier fly at the bottom or use same weight flies. Having the heavier fly up top and drifting the lighter fly behind does work well for many, but not these boys here. Sure, all your flies are in the strike zone, but do the physics: if the fish hits the trailer fly it now have more points at which the angle of the line/leader has to change to produce an effect on the indicator. By the time you notice something the fish could have spit it already.

                          OK, that's all I got.
                          @BigT, did I do good...?
                          Gonna piggyback on this one. I'm pretty new to Hooch river fishing aside from a few summers wet wading the lower tailrace and have a question about setup. Most folks seem to be throwing dual-nymphs somewhere around 6ft below indicators on 5wts. My main trout rod right now is a 5'9" 3wt which probably can't throw a rig like that. My other fly rod is a 9' 8wt that for some unknown reason is loaded up with floating line. Could I get by using the 8wt with indicator-nymph-nymph rigs as my Hooch rod? I know i'm going to sacrifice sensitivity and a lot of the fight doing that but I'm okay with that so long as it casts right.

                          Or, should I toss the floating line, load it up with full sink, and eschew numbers in favor of throwing streamers the size of horse tails?

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