Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

The Spawn

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    Originally posted by troutbum69 View Post
    I think if we're still allowed to kill over 10 deer a year per person in GA the population may be a touch high


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    In my last year of law school I took a wildlife law course for a fun, easy 2 hours (and got the only C of my entire education) and one of our guest speakers was one of the regional deer biologists. Someone asked about the limit since there were some proposed changes to the regs at that time. As he said it, the biologists get to present their studies when the limit is discussed by the Board but that itís State Farm and the Farm Bureau that get listened to. He said theyíve lobbied hard for the high limits since deer are a major source of auto insurance and crop insurance claims.

    Comment


    • #17
      Originally posted by JerryG View Post
      I think when bucks are running the does really hard they get mega exhausted. So alot of times when hunters shoot them they dont survive.


      This is the kind of reply I was looking for!

      Comment


      • #18
        Originally posted by muddy waters View Post
        In my last year of law school I took a wildlife law course for a fun, easy 2 hours (and got the only C of my entire education) and one of our guest speakers was one of the regional deer biologists. Someone asked about the limit since there were some proposed changes to the regs at that time. As he said it, the biologists get to present their studies when the limit is discussed by the Board but that itís State Farm and the Farm Bureau that get listened to. He said theyíve lobbied hard for the high limits since deer are a major source of auto insurance and crop insurance claims.


        Well I guess it's only an issue if biologists are calling for a drastic reduction in harvest vs lobbies want it to stay the same. I mean now hunting over corn is perfectly legal in most of Georgia. If I see some Browns out on the hooch I'll steer clear but if they're 4 feet or deeper I'll have no clue


        Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
        "I don't hate trout fishing, just the people who trout fish."
        -Our friend Nam, but secretly Ret

        "Stop Whining"

        Comment


        • #19
          Interesting question. I have spent a significant amount of time fishing for our striped friends when they are pre-spawn. I nearly always release my fish, and I will admit that it bothers me more when one won't go back during that period than other times of the year.

          When we are reservoir fishing for bass in the spring, we are targeting pre-spawn and spawning bass, whether we are trying to pick them off a bed or not.

          Most of the places I fish, I don't see the trout on the redds, but when they are spilling eggs all over the deck, it is pretty obvious that you are fishing spawning trout.

          Comment


          • #20
            Originally posted by troutbum69 View Post
            Well I guess it's only an issue if biologists are calling for a drastic reduction in harvest vs lobbies want it to stay the same. I mean now hunting over corn is perfectly legal in most of Georgia. If I see some Browns out on the hooch I'll steer clear but if they're 4 feet or deeper I'll have no clue


            Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
            The problem with listening to the insurance companies is that deer are adaptable. They can easily survive in close proximity to humans where they will never face a hunter. Shooting ten deer every season out in rural Georgia won't stop the deer living in suburbia or on the edge of a major highway from running out in front of a moving vehicle. You can't shoot deer in those places anyway, so what good does a high limit do? Special controlled hunts may thin out the population in a large park, but what about highway right of ways or that little wooded area between neighborhoods? Deer gather there because they won't get shot at and they don't have to work hard for food, and enough learn not to run out in front of vehicles to ensure a growing population of rats with antlers.

            Comment


            • #21
              Originally posted by Aardvark View Post
              The problem with listening to the insurance companies is that deer are adaptable. They can easily survive in close proximity to humans where they will never face a hunter. Shooting ten deer every season out in rural Georgia won't stop the deer living in suburbia or on the edge of a major highway from running out in front of a moving vehicle. You can't shoot deer in those places anyway, so what good does a high limit do? Special controlled hunts may thin out the population in a large park, but what about highway right of ways or that little wooded area between neighborhoods? Deer gather there because they won't get shot at and they don't have to work hard for food, and enough learn not to run out in front of vehicles to ensure a growing population of rats with antlers.


              I agree with you. I think it's funny DNR is making such a big stink about coyotes. I mean I hate the bastards too, but they're only natures solution to a deer problem. And the only reason we have "too many" deer is that we've moved into the places they like to live. Then wonder why there's so many of the **** things.


              Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
              "I don't hate trout fishing, just the people who trout fish."
              -Our friend Nam, but secretly Ret

              "Stop Whining"

              Comment


              • #22
                The deer are getting bolder and smarter! Some have resorted to using mass transit to get around.

                Message sent from your mom's bedroom during pillow talk

                Buck Henry
                Simple Goat Herder
                Former NGTO President
                Hall of Fame Member

                Comment


                • #23
                  This went from trout to deer to coyotes real quick.

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    I guess we're so used to bass fishing that trout on redds isn't a big deal? Flossing however is where I draw the line.


                    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
                    "I don't hate trout fishing, just the people who trout fish."
                    -Our friend Nam, but secretly Ret

                    "Stop Whining"

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      I assume no one wants to post any known spawning locations, but I do not know enough about spawning or trout behavior generally to consciously avoid them. I imagine many fishermen are in the same boat. I have never kept a Hooch fish so perhaps as Browniez pointed out it is a moot point.

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Originally posted by troutbum69 View Post
                        I guess we're so used to bass fishing that trout on redds isn't a big deal? Flossing however is where I draw the line.


                        Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
                        Luckily flossing on the Hooch at least happens far less due to the clarity and drop in traffic after September. Mountain streams I could not tell you about all that much.
                        Last edited by Philhutch80; 10-31-18, 12:54 PM.
                        #JBNavy

                        "Everyday is a new life to a wise man."
                        -Chinese Proverb

                        ďAt sunrise everything is luminous but not clear.Ē
                        -Norman Maclean

                        "We are what we hunt."
                        -PH

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          The risk of damaging redds is real, and stressing spawners can lead to premature egg dropping and is potentially lethal for already stressed fish, especially if accompanied by poor fish handling. That said, I suspect like most angler activities, our perception of its impact is exaggerated when compared to say, the impact of letting dirt get in the watershed. We've also got, in the Southeast, a "spawning season" that in some drainages might run from mid-October to **** near the end of April, when you account for the spawns of multiple species. You're basically talking half the year in which you can reasonably expect to encounter redds or spawning/staging fish on trout streams.

                          There is a lot of ethically questionable behavior that happens around big spawning trout. A lot of those fish do get flossed, intentionally or otherwise. The snaggers are definitely more active during known prime spawning periods. But, big trout are always a major source of sour grapes and controversy, probably because a small percentage of trout anglers catch the overwhelming majority of big trout.
                          Last edited by Dylar; 10-31-18, 12:01 PM.

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            It is hard to compare fishing for spawning bass vs. trout because their habits and the methods of fishing for them are so different. Wading through a trout spawning ground will do much more harm than boating up to a bass bed. Bass fishermen are usually after the bigger females because they can make the difference between a trophy and a finish out of the money. The male is left alone or released after the female is caught. The male can then spawn with other females or continue to guard the nest. If you catch and keep both, then the eggs will be eaten, but if the male goes back to the nest, then the eggs have a chance. The female also does not hang around long after spawning, so a small fish on a bed won't get much attention unless there are big females nearby. I am not certain of this, but I believe that bass are more prolific than trout, too. Removing a spawning bass won't be as harmful as removing a spawning trout because bass lay more eggs than trout of comparable size. I still don't like the idea of fishing for bedding bass, but I don't fish tournaments, so I don't need that six pound kicker fish to have a good day.

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              I think sections of the hooch should be closed to fishing just like they do on the South Holston. That river is so good because itís managed correctly. I know most of you on here respect the wild browns of the hooch just like me. However for those who canít respect it, makes it frustrating for those who can.

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Without going into details, are there spawning locations away from the popular access areas?

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X