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First Georgia Spec

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  • First Georgia Spec

    Here's another post to help distract you guys from the Monday Blues.

    I decided to follow up my first GA blue line trip with a return visit to see what lives higher up the stream.

    I checked the water temperature just before heading home last weekend, and I realized that I should have spent the day fishing much higher up. So this time we showed up ready to put in a few uphill miles before wetting a line.

    After making a few wrong turns on the trail, we finally found the first set of falls and were excited to see if any specs were home.

    IMG_4353.jpg
    IMG_4348.jpg
    IMG_4341.jpg
    Just a few casts into the first hole, a beautiful brookie came up and inhaled my dad's fly. It was his first Brook trout ever. We continued to catch specs in most of the likely spots and all on yellow dry flys. Although I have spent plenty of time on the specs streams of the Tennessee Smokys, these were the first indigenous fish that I've caught in Georgia.

    IMG_4332.jpg
    IMG_4354.jpg

    Overall, the fishing was good. Not great, but not bad either. It was great to get out in the woods two weekends in a row, and it was even better to get to be out there with my father.
    Fish on, and then some...

  • #2
    Please enlighten me on this blue lining thing. I gave seem in mentioned quite a bit


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    • #3
      Ok, now I'm envious!

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      • #4
        love that last picture with the falls. Nice work up there on the tiny streams. I have to start exploring these places....wherever they are. A little time with the Gazetteer ought to help.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Gabassman View Post
          Please enlighten me on this blue lining thing. I gave seem in mentioned quite a bit


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          Pull out a topographic map, look for the "blue lines" which indicate rivers/streams, throw on some hiking boots and go explore some new water. Don't post specific stream names.


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          • #6
            Originally posted by txc35 View Post
            love that last picture with the falls.
            I'm with txc35 - that last picture is fantastic. But, I actually enjoyed the picture of the trail too. I know how satisfying/relieving/exciting (depending on how badly you need a trail) it can be to hook back up with a trail after some time looking for one. Thanks for the great blue line report.
            I'm so old I remember when men wore tattoos and women wore earrings.
            -Lefty Kreh

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            • #7
              Alright, Cutty. . . These are great photos, but they're jes' too dad-blamed small! Meaux an' I are fixin' to walk the hound dogs around the neighborhood and then clip their nails - or visey-versy. But when I git back, we'll have a little tutorial put down so as we can git you to post your pitchers in all their full, glorious size! (In the meantime, set yerse'f up a photobucket account an' upload yer pitchers to that account.)

              Here's a link to photobucket.com
              If you have difficulty understanding the post above, read it out loud and it should make sense. This NGTO member is known for his poor hill-billy upbringing and his affinity for all things from Louisiana (particularly if it relates to LSU). It makes for a poor mix of accents and much difficulty in translation. He was doing well for so long, but now seems to have regressed.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Gabassman View Post
                Please enlighten me on this blue lining thing. I gave seem in mentioned quite a bit


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                Click on this link then click on Rabun County. This may explain your question. They are the feeder streams and tributaries within the water shed.
                http://georgiawildlife.com/node/740

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                • #9
                  Gatorbyte put this little tutorial together for posting photos to the forum here. The first post deals with photobucket.com which tends to be the most commonly used site for photo hosting.

                  I'd suggest setting the photo size to 800x600 though.

                  How to post photos on NGTO
                  If you have difficulty understanding the post above, read it out loud and it should make sense. This NGTO member is known for his poor hill-billy upbringing and his affinity for all things from Louisiana (particularly if it relates to LSU). It makes for a poor mix of accents and much difficulty in translation. He was doing well for so long, but now seems to have regressed.

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                  • #10
                    Swamp Angel - I'm on it. I'll re-post them here later this afternoon. Thanks for sharing the info, i've been wondering how everyone but me seems to be able to post full size images
                    Fish on, and then some...

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                    • #11








                      Fish on, and then some...

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by KeithO View Post
                        Pull out a topographic map, look for the "blue lines" which indicate rivers/streams, throw on some hiking boots and go explore some new water. Don't post specific stream names.


                        Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk


                        Originally posted by Remoh View Post
                        Click on this link then click on Rabun County. This may explain your question. They are the feeder streams and tributaries within the water shed.

                        http://georgiawildlife.com/node/740

                        Thanks y'all. Sounds like a lot if fun. I will most defiantly have to give it a try. According to the raburn co map this's blue lines are seasonal streams. When do those close?


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                        • #13
                          November first. I think...
                          http://www.georgiawildlife.com/node/1307
                          Fish on, and then some...

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                          • #14
                            Now THAT'S what I'm talkin' 'bout! Lookin' SA-WEEEEEEET!
                            If you have difficulty understanding the post above, read it out loud and it should make sense. This NGTO member is known for his poor hill-billy upbringing and his affinity for all things from Louisiana (particularly if it relates to LSU). It makes for a poor mix of accents and much difficulty in translation. He was doing well for so long, but now seems to have regressed.

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                            • #15
                              I guess I'll have to find a free weekend in October and go try my hand at this.


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