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GA Secondary Trout Streams

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  • #46
    Originally posted by THE EG View Post
    Fellas, no need to sneak around in the dark of night. Because of the popularity of brook trout, the DNR will pay you to analyze streams, repair habitat and tote brook trout. They call them interns. If you want to do it for free, they call you TU volunteers.



    My anecdotes are several streams I am aware of (I think you know a couple now) that have previously been known to contain brook trout, then did not have brook trout, were then restocked with "as best they know" pure SABT, and end up once again not having any brook trout in them. I learned the new word to me "expirtated" through Back The Brookie activities. Nobody knows exactly why streams sporadically lose their populations but yall have mentioned the main suggested reasons; drought and high temps. I'm not sure siltation is as big a concern with the National Forest fish, but it probably does happen also.

    I think that Foothills project has been posted on the message board before. If you want more brook trout in the National Forest, go make those concerns known there, if the comment periods are still available. It's not just about trees.
    Could it be habitat fragmentation? Those small stream seem like that would happen naturally due to various reasons, but in the past they could repopulate?
    I like em big fat and sloppy.

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    • #47
      Originally posted by browniez View Post
      Could it be habitat fragmentation? Those small stream seem like that would happen naturally due to various reasons, but in the past they could repopulate?
      Doubtful. If there is a barrier to keep bows out, it would keep brookies out too. Our current populations have always been cut off from other populations of fish. They could go downstream, introducing their genes to a different population, but there have never been new genes coming UP the barrier falls. The exception being human introduction.
      The first thing scripture tells us about man is that we're made in the image of God. The second thing it says is that man should have dominion over the fishes of the sea.

      The right flies at the right time: Monthly Fly

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      • #48
        As good a place to ask it as any... I was under the impression that any SABTs in the coosa river basin were introduced and that they aren't truly native populations. Whether that's true, the streams that seem to be good candidates appear to have suffered from relatively recent habitat destruction by the time I venture there. Be it development upstream or drought/wildfire/deforestation combinations. There are certainly a number of streams left on my list to explore for the fabled coosa basin specks, but that's taken a back seat to exploration of other basins. So, what say you, are they the work of midnight bucket runs?
        -skunked

        Warning: all posts should be assumed to contain sarcasm and misinformation unless stated otherwise. The opinions shared are not necessarily those of the poster.

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        • #49
          On a side note, I'd rather catch wild northerns than SABT any day. (ps. what happened to the :stirs: emoji?)
          The first thing scripture tells us about man is that we're made in the image of God. The second thing it says is that man should have dominion over the fishes of the sea.

          The right flies at the right time: Monthly Fly

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