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Small streams are so good right now

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  • Small streams are so good right now

    Took a day off work and headed for the hills - knowing this will be my last time out for a bit because of kids, summer, life, work, and a July road trip, I chose somewhere easy, high up, and full of wild fish.

    I caught somewhere north of sixteen wild bows, missed easily that many - water was high and fast, especially for June. I found that slower pools of medium depth were really active - anything moving fast or deeper than four feet was out. Plunge pools were unresponsive to everything I threw at them.

    Normally I don't take photos because I dropped my phone in a creek a few years ago, but it was calm enough today that I grabbed a few. Note the dead snake that washed down.

    Biggest fish I got in was ~ 8in : sitting the middle of the water column, so I sent it a dropper and it rose to the dry. Go figure. I sent droppers into the deeper pools and got nothing (and it may have been my offering) but the dries worked well.

    It's SO GOOD out there right now. The woods are clean and cool, the water is deep and fast and alive, the falls are roaring, and I was the only one out there with a rod today. GO NOW!
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  • #2
    His post
    Was the dead snake lost prey, by a bird or something. The neck area looks ravaged...



    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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    • #3
      I think the neck area is a function of the picture - the light, the ripples, etc. In the creek it seemed unmangled. Interesting, though - I thought it had just washed down and died in a deluge, but I have no basis for that statement and it might be idiotic.

      You can't tell from the photo but that's about a 2/2.5 foot long snake - so if it was prey, my money would be on an eagle or a great horned owl; although I have seen barred owls down here in ATL take out feral cats, so could also be a strix varia.

      I don't know which animals other than owls, eagles, and raccoons eat snakes. I could google it, but I don't trust the Internet with important questions like this. For example, I just typed in 'do sasquatch eat snakes' and got back an article about a sasquatch hunter who caught a squatch licking bacon out of his camp pans. You'd think if you were a fulltime cryptozoolo-wrangler and a Bigfoot was in your bacon, you'd get a photo of it or hit it with a tranq dart or something.

      Do snakes eat other snakes? Foxes, possums?

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      • #4
        These high water cycles are just magic on the bluelines man. Try tightlining a BFN (Big You Know Nymph) through some of those plunge pools. You never know what you might dredge up...

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        • #5
          Dylar - so true. Timing of the water / sunshine is perfect right now. Creek I was on drains a large area and its still full of water.

          I dropped copper johns and WD40s through the pools - what should I have tried?

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          • #6
            Sweet! I know what I’ll be doing tomorrow.
            Nice report.

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            • #7
              Sweet dry fly action. Nice report.
              "A free people ought not only to be armed, but disciplined..." George Washington

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              • #8
                Nice report. Loving these high water blue lines. The fish all just seem healthier.
                Check out my personal Facebook page Tight Lines Joe of North Georgia and my Instagram Page Tightlinesjoe where I give tips on different tactics, stream reports and pictures of Georgia trout!

                Team Georgia Competitive Fly Fishing Team now has a Facebook Page and an Instagram Page . Check them out for great information, pictures and events!

                New to fly fishing? Check out Monthlyfly.com For localized Match The Hatch Flies mailed to your door!

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                • #9
                  ...something else...over the years I have noticed that after significant rains, there is more food in the trough, so to speak...bugs, worms, and critters get displaced from riparian dwelling places...fish get active responding to the abundance of food...

                  Blessings!

                  Jimmy

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by mudrun View Post
                    Dylar - so true. Timing of the water / sunshine is perfect right now. Creek I was on drains a large area and its still full of water.

                    I dropped copper johns and WD40s through the pools - what should I have tried?
                    If you got a big bead head girdle bug or some other rubber leg impressionistic type rubber leg stone pattern, that's the kind of thing you want. If you've got it on a jighead, even better. #6-10, something like that. Little creek fish love BIG stones.

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                    • #11
                      Thanks, Dylar - I had a few nymphs that might have worked yesterday but didn't try them.

                      Here's another question - the rains washed a crap-ton of debris down and around, took out some embankments, and turned others soft. There was a lot of large detritus clogging up seemingly every spill deeper than six inches.

                      I am curious if this might have been enough rain to wash specks over barrier falls and into places where specks often aren't, which would mean tigers in some creeks next year.

                      But is the timing right? I think we'd want it more towards August/Sept... but maybe not...

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by mudrun View Post
                        Thanks, Dylar - I had a few nymphs that might have worked yesterday but didn't try them.

                        Here's another question - the rains washed a crap-ton of debris down and around, took out some embankments, and turned others soft. There was a lot of large detritus clogging up seemingly every spill deeper than six inches.

                        I am curious if this might have been enough rain to wash specks over barrier falls and into places where specks often aren't, which would mean tigers in some creeks next year.

                        But is the timing right? I think we'd want it more towards August/Sept... but maybe not...
                        My understanding from the biologists—and it matches my personal experience, for what it's worth, is that it takes a whale of flood to really significantly displace wild trout. Stockers, with their tank friendly genetics, generally poor conditioning and frequently ravaged fins get blown about a good bit more.

                        Now el Tigre is a favorite topic of conversation among blueliners in these parts, but it's all rank speculation without much in the way of information inputs. My guess is you need it to get and stay cold really early in the year, or perhaps really late, but "guess" is the relevant word here; it's not based on even anecdotal observation, much less actual data.

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                        • #13
                          [QUOTE=Counslrman;899973]...something else...over the years I have noticed that after significant rains, there is more food in the trough, so to speak...bugs, worms, and critters get displaced from riparian dwelling places...fish get active responding to the abundance of food...

                          Same experience for me Jimmy..Summer in general is good for terrestrials, but during and after a shower lots of them get washed in..I have success with ant patterns in those conditions.
                          Tight lines!!

                          Doc

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