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Ol' Foot-long. My PB Brookie.

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  • #16
    Beautiful! Congrats, Kyle! That is one hell of a fish. Mounting it?

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    • #17
      Think of all the seasons fished, pools explored, creeks waded, trails hiked, topo maps scrutinized that went into that one fish ... WOW. The wilderness offers its finest rewards to the most patient people. Well done, sir.

      There's often the question of keep or toss back (I almost always toss back, but there are definitely times when it 'feels right' to keep and cook) but that is one old fish who avoided a lot of lures and baits over the years - feels like the right thing to have taken him with you. That's a great fish to enjoy for the rest of the slow season.

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      • #18
        K2 - great fish and story, you earned that old timer!
        RScott

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        • #19
          Thanks for the kind words fellas. To answer the question, this trout was destined for the table, and not the taxidermist. I am scrounging pennies right now and trying to save $ for a new truck. On the issue of keeping the trout, my keeping it was strictly pragmatic. I just knew I had to put a tape on it. Otherwise, it'd have been nice to let it go. This trout was an old soldier. Who knows what lures, flies, and bait he had seen. Who knows if or how many times he had been caught before. This might very well have been a fish that one of you all caught before and released in the past. Who knows?!?!i I release 99% of the specks I catch on that creek, and I fish it avidly. It might have been one that I released once or twice before in the many years I have fished it. I would like to have let a SPECIMINS like that swim away. Had my tape been in my pack, that would have been the case. I'll keep any ol' speck on occasion, but I'd be tickled to let an old war horse like that swim away.
          Buckman and many others urged me to mount it. I did consider it. I guess I'll resolve to mount the next biggun I catch. I'm shooting for 13" now. Might take me another 8 years, but if a 13incher gets the hook sometime around the year 2025, it is going in the wall.

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          • #20
            Aslan was with you in the woods! Great fish man. Really unbelievable

            Sent from my SM-G900V using Tapatalk
            _yero on instagram

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            • #21
              Oh my goodness that is a fish of dreams right there. Great stuff man, and thanks for sharing!

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              • #22
                Logged back in today to read this story and see the speck again and get ramped for heading out ... I'm visiting family in Colorado and we are headed into the wilderness for a week starting Sunday.

                I drove out here, and a good fish or two will make that long, long road home through Texas, Oklahoma, Arkansas, and Missouri a whole lot more bearable.

                (On a related note, it was hard driving over the White. Why am I putting this river in my rearview? Makes no sense.)

                Kyle, this is a beautiful fish, and I clearly need to hit the maps and trails some more in the Hooch NF.

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                • #23
                  Lovely fish. At the growth rates attainable in most southern Appalachian headwaters streams, that's a fish pushing five, maybe six years old, and that's pretty much as long as a brook trout can live. It is exceedingly rare to see one live past three in this part of the country.

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by Dylar View Post
                    Lovely fish. At the growth rates attainable in most southern Appalachian headwaters streams, that's a fish pushing five, maybe six years old, and that's pretty much as long as a brook trout can live. It is exceedingly rare to see one live past three in this part of the country.
                    Dylar, here is another interesting fact. This fish's stomach contained merely one large stonefly. The rest of the contents were skeletal. There were two spinal columns, and one dish's lower jawbone. There are no other fish species in that part of the creek. No shiners, chubs, Dace, other trout or other minnows. Th confirms what we already know. They can be cannabilistic just like all other trout. When they grow to this fish's size, they need the protein, so they get the protein. That I could discern, this speck wasn't messing with midges. He was on the protein, to include other brook trout.

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                    • #25
                      Oh yeah, I've caught 9" brookies with 4" brookies jammed down their gullets, sometimes with the bones from the fins sticking out through their sides. They're the most aggressive salmonids on earth weight for weight.

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by Dylar View Post
                        Oh yeah, I've caught 9" brookies with 4" brookies jammed down their gullets, sometimes with the bones from the fins sticking out through their sides. They're the most aggressive salmonids on earth weight for weight.
                        You ate absolutely right about that. I sometimes call them "creek sharks". They amaze me. I'd be tickled to catch one with another speck down it's throat. That'd be photoworthy!
                        I remember on that same creek where this one came from, I was fishing s free years ago. I cast s fly into the head of a pool. In a split second, I caught sight of a brook trout darting across the pool. It tried to take the fly but missed. It has gained so much speedsnd velocity, it cleared not far shy of 1' out of the water. I was amazed watching that probably 5" fish sail through the air. I laughed, and remember thinking "that thing is a tadpole that thinks it's a whale".

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                        • #27
                          Sweet! Oink, oink.

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                          • #28
                            Heckuva fish right there Kyle! Not surprised at all that he went piscivorious. Now it is on to 13"!!!
                            #JBNavy

                            "Everyday is a new life to a wise man."
                            -Chinese Proverb

                            “At sunrise everything is luminous but not clear.”
                            -Norman Maclean

                            "We are what we hunt."
                            -PH

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                            • #29
                              Solid fish man, Congrats! I can't imagine the shear excitement you must of felt reeling that bad boy in. Creek shark for sure.
                              "Releasing a fish is that much sweeter, letting go of the ephemeral back into the void, to return to where it, and our dreams, can grow." - Jason Tucker

                              Instagram @_big_wurm

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                              • #30
                                Wow. New here , but congrats. That a heck of a fish.

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