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Let the farm know one of their pigs escaped!

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  • Let the farm know one of their pigs escaped!

    I have fished this stream which I have called my favorite probably about 50-70 times in the last two years. This weekend I decided to fish the lower end which never produces well for me but it paid off. After about an hour of fishing I somehow spotted this guy in a nice shallow run. At first I though it was just another fish rock that I got too excited about but then he turned and flashed at me and I knew my eyes werenít deceiving me. I cast my hopper dropper over him many times, no interest. Switched to smaller nymphs, larger, attractors, naturals and even an egg, no luck. I dropped back to the next pool, tied on a wooly bugger and took position back where I felt comfortable not spooking it and waited a little just in case it became weary of me when I moved back in. As I was standing in the pool the fish dropped right being me in about 5Ē of water. I plopped my bugger in front of it, gave it a twitch, and bam Iím on. I couldnít believe it. I grabbed my phone to try to record some of the fight by placing it on the stream side but as soon as I did that the fish took me downstream about 4 pools. 17.5 minutes later I landed the fish with no net on a 4 wt with 6x tippet, ran back up stream to get a few pictures and let the beauty go. What an experience, I didnít think a fish like that was possible in GA public water!



    Measured at 22Ē with my iPhone measure app but the shoulders on this guy were insane.

    One final thought (sorry for the long post), and people might get mad at me once I say this but I have to bring it up because itís strange. When the fish dropped behind me in the pool, I noticed there was another fish tucked up right next to it and if Iím not mistaken, these fish were spawning. In fact Iím about 100% sure they were. I didnít realize this until it dropped behind me and I saw the other fish with it. But the fish was making some weird movement when I saw it before like what appeared to be rubbing on the bottom causing it to flash for 3 or 4 seconds. Has anyone ever seen rainbows spawning in the fall before??
    And before you shame me try not fishing to the fish of a lifetime because itís spawning in the wrong season and the fish swam off very well into the same pool I caught it in!


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  • #2
    Great story.
    And there are strains of rainbows that spawn in winter, so it's possible, although it might also be cornfused by the whacky weather, lol

    Not sure if you were being serious Amor a pig escaping the farm, but that happens. A buddy and I have gotten a few that way, wrote the shock on a small stream.




    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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    • #3
      Originally posted by jjbeno View Post
      Has anyone ever seen rainbows spawning in the fall before??
      Awesome report!

      The spawning activity is definitely far earlier than expected and I might hesitate to believe you if I didn't witness the same thing this past Friday at NCF. There was no mistaking the hen bow we watched less than 20' in front of us in about 5" of water going through the typical egg laying dance for around ten minutes.
      "Everyone blows their money on stupid stuff. Just choose which stupid you want and roll with it."


      Mark

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      • #4
        Aw esome Fish!!!

        Super Super cool fish!!! That is the nicest bow I have seen from public waters in a long long time!!! Congrats!!!
        Far as the spawning goes, which Splatek16 alluded to, the Feds have eight different phenotypes of rainbow trouts that came from all different environs. As a result they also happen to have staggered spawning patterns that vary from the normal mid to late spring spawning period. I have had bows drop eggs or milt in every month except July-Sept. You also may notice on some rainbows that they will have an orange slash on the underjaw. From what the folks at multiple hatcheries have said it is a recessive gene that is showing up but they are not cutbows.
        That is incredible that you caught that fish the way you did. If you released the fish I hope she spawns successfully!!!
        #JBNavy

        "Everyday is a new life to a wise man."
        -Chinese Proverb

        ďAt sunrise everything is luminous but not clear.Ē
        -Norman Maclean

        "We are what we hunt."
        -PH

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Philhutch80 View Post
          Super Super cool fish!!! That is the nicest bow I have seen from public waters in a long long time!!! Congrats!!!
          Far as the spawning goes, which Splatek16 alluded to, the Feds have eight different phenotypes of rainbow trouts that came from all different environs. As a result they also happen to have staggered spawning patterns that vary from the normal mid to late spring spawning period. I have had bows drop eggs or milt in every month except July-Sept. You also may notice on some rainbows that they will have an orange slash on the underjaw. From what the folks at multiple hatcheries have said it is a recessive gene that is showing up but they are not cutbows.
          That is incredible that you caught that fish the way you did. If you released the fish I hope she spawns successfully!!!
          Add to that pellet / chow that is likely laden with hormones and what not and the reproductive process might be upregulated. We see that in humans; human are actually seasonal breeders to some extent, but in western cultures and cultures that are affluent (i.e. we have all the available resources to just keep making babies) we prosper when it comes to reproductive success. Could be a similar mechanism at play here: no reason to delay repro, because there are a bunch of floating pellets every tuesday and thursday to keep our babies cooking... so to speak.

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          • #6
            Sooie!!!

            Itís not every day that you catch a 22í bow with a kype in a Georgia creek.

            Anyone know the growth rate on a small water bow? Iím curious how long this thing has held over assuming it was stocked at 10-12í.

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            • #7
              Very nice. They're up there - even in the remote waters where they never see a pellet - but hard to find and even harder to catch. Good job!
              Speck

              Follower of Christ
              Pursuer of trout
              -------------------------------------------------
              "Your genuine action will explain itself and will explain your other genuine actions. Your conformity explains nothing." -- Emerson

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              • #8
                Awesome fish!

                I have a theory based on nothing scientific, but I believe trout in our state can spawn throughout the year. Sure, in the fall, browns and brookies have a peak spawn, and in March rainbows peak, but I also believe there is spawning activity in our streams 12 months a year? Iíve cleaned fish with mature eggs and milt all year long, stockers and wild fish.

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                • #9
                  Thanks all!
                  Because of where this fish was caught and it’s weight I do think It migrated upstream to spawn from its pellet filled home. Interesting thoughts about hormones in the pellets. I worked in the CNF hatchery in Suches last summer and saw the ingredients in the pellets as well as what is added to them and I’ll just say it’s not mayflies caddis flies and stoneflies �� so that would make sense.
                  Also it is true that fish probably could have success spawning year round in GA and if it’s successful then it’s reasonable that different populations could emerge that spawn at different times. And the success of these fish could have something to do with being fed pellets, so maybe has one of these late spawning populations.
                  I was really fishing for a brown that’s prespawn. I caught two browns this weekend and neither seemed to have spawning colors or be on it’s way to spawning ground. Any one having luck on the prespawn small stream brownies?


                  Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
                  Last edited by THE EG; 10-18-18, 01:27 PM.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by splatek16 View Post
                    human are actually seasonal breeders to some extent,
                    Message sent from your mom's bedroom during pillow talk

                    Buck Henry
                    Simple Goat Herder
                    Former NGTO President
                    Hall of Fame Member

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                    • #11
                      Most of the largest rainbows are fall/early winter spawners. Look at the fins and conditioning on that fish, though, almost certainly wild.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Buck Henry View Post
                        Cuffing season
                        I like em big fat and sloppy.

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                        • #13
                          Man... That's a crazy nice rainbow. Congrats.
                          Hi my name is Charles and I'm a fishaholic.

                          Some days I'm the hook and some days I'm the fish.

                          Instagram @charles_the_toothsmith

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                          • #14
                            Awesome fish. A lifetime catch in a wild steam in Georgia.

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                            • #15
                              That stream is a decent stream. It has been good to me in past years. I manage to get on 1-2 gooduns each year there. I wish more fatties would swim up and down stream there and end up in the public stretch, but I'm satisfied with 1 or 2 good hawgs each year. Interestingly, the downstream stretch has always produced the biggins for me. I never have caught a pellet fed slob at the upstream part of the stretch.

                              As for the breeding behavior, bows really are not supposed to exhibit that behavior this time of year, but we are on the outer peripheral of trout habitat in the southern U.S. Especially that stream you fished. Drive just 5-10 miles south on that river, and there are no trout in that stream. It is barely a trout stream to begin with. With a wide varience in water temps, extremely heavy fishing pressure, and different genetic strains of stocked fish, its easy to see that oddball behavior can occur. There's a lot of unnatural and "wonky' things going on in the water there. I once scooped up a dead bullhead catfish in my trout net there in the same pool that I caught a 20" rainbow in the year before. Also caught largemouth bass in that same pool. Its a place where mostly warmwater gamefish can survive, and often do, and where a SUPER hardy trout can barely survive. If the conditions are right there, a big trout might actually be able to survive the summer there.

                              I've had many a brown trout and brook trout "christen" me with milt on the Smith Creek DH in January, February, and March. Hens with eggs too.
                              I'm sure the artificial production of trout and release of them into streams at that time has a lot to do with it. I'm not saying its a bad thing, but I believe it does impact a trout's natural patterns. Browns should never be squirting milt on you in February, but it has probably happened to me just short of a dozen times in the Feb. time frame. That ain't natural.

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