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  • #16
    Brood Hen?

    Could she be a brood hen? If she is, I wonder if they stocked her with that scar or she got it in the river? But yes a lot of our bigger fish are brood stock no longer in the fish egg production and fertilization business.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by JOHNKIES View Post
      Could she be a brood hen? If she is, I wonder if they stocked her with that scar or she got it in the river? But yes a lot of our bigger fish are brood stock no longer in the fish egg production and fertilization business.
      Could she be a brood hen? Sure, one that was born and raised in the river. Did you consider how many stocking truck chasers we have that get stocked fish out as fast as they hit the water? There are plenty of good studies that have been done by the DNR and other scientific entities on tailwaters that simply do not support your argument. They all point to natural trout reproduction with adequate high protein food supply. It would be interesting to here a biologist who studies the river to quantify the origin though rather than for us 'bucket biologist' to wax poetic on theories. We just are not qualified to answer.
      Last edited by Philhutch80; 06-28-17, 08:50 AM.
      #JBNavy

      "Everyday is a new life to a wise man."
      -Chinese Proverb

      “At sunrise everything is luminous but not clear.”
      -Norman Maclean

      "We are what we hunt."
      -PH

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      • #18
        As one who used to work for the CO Division of Wildlife, I can promise you that most biologists would be a lot slower than most posters I see on the internet to claim definitive knowledge about the origin of a particular fish. For a season, I worked out of the same office as a couple of fish biologists doing research on reproductive success in kokanee. It took a lot of intentionality, hard work, and specialized tools and knowledge for those biologists to confidently state whether a fish was stream-born or hatchery-born. The same is true of whether a trout is "wild" or stocked in GA. There are some tell-tale signs of a fish being fresh from the hatchery, but not all hatchery fish show those signs and sometimes wild fish can have injuries that approximate them. In the end, people making judgments on whether a fish is "wild" or stocked is just a guess, some more educated than others.

        With all that being said, my guess is that she was stocked as a larger fish but not recently. She looks to be in too good of shape--fins and coloration--to have come straight out of the hatchery. Since the injury is both on top and bottom, my guess is she got wrapped up in fishing line and it cut into her as she grew until it finally broke loose. That most likely happened after she was put in the river. So if you use the bottom of the cuts as your reference point, I'd imagine she was about that size or a little smaller when she was stocked. But again, that's just a guess.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by Chsmith_jr View Post
          As one who used to work for the CO Division of Wildlife, I can promise you that most biologists would be a lot slower than most posters I see on the internet to claim definitive knowledge about the origin of a particular fish. For a season, I worked out of the same office as a couple of fish biologists doing research on reproductive success in kokanee. It took a lot of intentionality, hard work, and specialized tools and knowledge for those biologists to confidently state whether a fish was stream-born or hatchery-born. The same is true of whether a trout is "wild" or stocked in GA. There are some tell-tale signs of a fish being fresh from the hatchery, but not all hatchery fish show those signs and sometimes wild fish can have injuries that approximate them. In the end, people making judgments on whether a fish is "wild" or stocked is just a guess, some more educated than others.

          With all that being said, my guess is that she was stocked as a larger fish but not recently. She looks to be in too good of shape--fins and coloration--to have come straight out of the hatchery. Since the injury is both on top and bottom, my guess is she got wrapped up in fishing line and it cut into her as she grew until it finally broke loose. That most likely happened after she was put in the river. So if you use the bottom of the cuts as your reference point, I'd imagine she was about that size or a little smaller when she was stocked. But again, that's just a guess.
          Most logical answer I have seen. So much speculation can be drawn from the last paragraph though. I did not notice the scars around the anal fin though. Good eye.
          #JBNavy

          "Everyday is a new life to a wise man."
          -Chinese Proverb

          “At sunrise everything is luminous but not clear.”
          -Norman Maclean

          "We are what we hunt."
          -PH

          Comment

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