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Question regarding Conasauga and Jacks Rivers

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  • Question regarding Conasauga and Jacks Rivers

    Only the Conasauga requires artificial lures during part of the year and not the Jacks River?

    Thanks

  • #2
    Yessir.


    http://www.eregulations.com/georgia/...trout-fishing/

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    • #3
      Hmmm. I knew Conausuga was artificials only, but wasn't aware that it was only from November 1 - last Saturday in March. Does anyone on here know why it's restricted to that time period?

      I could see it being because of spawning concerns, but if that's the case why isn't Jack's under the same regulations? If it's not that, any chance it's just a leftover regulation from back in the day when year-round fishing was limited to a handful of trout streams? The only other thing I can think of is there was a time when Conasauga was highly regarded as a trophy stream, much like Dicks and Waters? I know Conasauga still has the reputation as a place with an above average chance of catching a trophy fish, but unlike Waters and Dicks... as far as I know... the Connie' hasn't been stocked or managed anywhere near comparable to the other two in a very long time. Like the '70s, right?

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      • #4
        Memory can fail at this point of my life, but back in the day before DNR could do trout regs by administrative regulation (seriously, there was a time when designation of what streams were seasonal, artificial, etc., was by statute, complete with the specific stream going though both houses of the General Assembly, for a stream to be changed from seasonal to year round or artifical; that got changed in late 90s maybe), I think the DNR then wanted to make both year round, add Connie as artificial only as well, but got some push back from some dedicated bait fishermen, and compromised on the season.

        I reserve the right to be wrong on the specifics, but essentially it was a compromise to keep some people happy.

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        • #5
          Thanks for the replies

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          • #6
            Off topic, but where do you fish the Connie? I have fished it along the river trail as I hiked it with no luck ( probably user error though). I usually hit the trail in Cisco or Crandall and head east on the trail.

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            • #7
              I have fished it near bray field up and down from there. Fishing is really tough on that river. Fish are super spooky and in my experience it is a whole lot of work for a few hand sized fish. However, the scenery is absolutely amazing and well worth it even if you are skunked. The whole Cohutta wilderness is truly an amazing place.

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              • #8
                sorry for the late reply, but just based on everything I've read and heard, Jack's is moderate quality trout water at best. Most of it is lower elevation, higher temps, and going to have other fish like redeye bass.
                Due to the trail and the falls that are super popular to hike and swim on Jack's, that area in general gets more pressure.
                I think that combination of factors is what drives heavier regulation there.
                Resident Tenkara Nerd

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                • #9
                  I have had better luck starting from the tops of the mountains, at the eastern trailheads, and walking downstream/downhill. Both the Jacks and the Conasauga have hard stops for where the quality of the trout fishing ends rapidly - you'll know it because it's where the trophy water for chubs begins.

                  My own (admittedly limited) experience suggests that in a two year period with a bunch of rain (and no wildfires, ideally), the Jacks tributaries will have more action than the main stem. That said, they're slippery, perilous, unmarked, and periodically plunge into inaccessible places.

                  Conasauga tributaries are probably colder than the Jacks but also smaller and definitely harder to get into - but the Connie's main stem from the convergence of the tribs up in the mountains along the CRT to just south of sunset rock is better than the mainstem of the Jacks along a comparable course.

                  Getting in there is a long hike. Getting out is a terrible uphill. You may be totally, utterly, rod-smashingly skunked and you may have endured the stings of thousands of yellow jackets to achieve this skunkdom. Sometimes you may even see the trout bolt from a picture perfect pool when you are still several paces away, and you may wait for them to return - and they just don't.

                  The Cohutta's a good place to go if you love wilderness or if you harbor private romantic notions of channelling your inner Shackelton. It's really not a great destination for catching trout - but if you do, it will be pretty darn awesome because you will have earned it.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by mudrun View Post
                    The Cohutta's a good place to go if you love wilderness or if you harbor private romantic notions of channelling your inner Shackelton. It's really not a great destination for catching trout - but if you do, it will be pretty darn awesome because you will have earned it.
                    I could not have said it better. I've been many places where the fishing is easier, but the feeling you get from just landing a few in the Cohutta Wilderness is pretty dang good.
                    Resident Tenkara Nerd

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by mudrun View Post
                      I have had better luck starting from the tops of the mountains, at the eastern trailheads, and walking downstream/downhill. Both the Jacks and the Conasauga have hard stops for where the quality of the trout fishing ends rapidly - you'll know it because it's where the trophy water for chubs begins.

                      My own (admittedly limited) experience suggests that in a two year period with a bunch of rain (and no wildfires, ideally), the Jacks tributaries will have more action than the main stem. That said, they're slippery, perilous, unmarked, and periodically plunge into inaccessible places.

                      Conasauga tributaries are probably colder than the Jacks but also smaller and definitely harder to get into - but the Connie's main stem from the convergence of the tribs up in the mountains along the CRT to just south of sunset rock is better than the mainstem of the Jacks along a comparable course.

                      Getting in there is a long hike. Getting out is a terrible uphill. You may be totally, utterly, rod-smashingly skunked and you may have endured the stings of thousands of yellow jackets to achieve this skunkdom. Sometimes you may even see the trout bolt from a picture perfect pool when you are still several paces away, and you may wait for them to return - and they just don't.

                      The Cohutta's a good place to go if you love wilderness or if you harbor private romantic notions of channelling your inner Shackelton. It's really not a great destination for catching trout - but if you do, it will be pretty darn awesome because you will have earned it.
                      I love the way you put it. I have backpacked the Cohutta multiple times before I started fly fishing but always heard that the fishing is tough there.
                      Hi my name is Charles and I'm a fishaholic.

                      Some days I'm the hook and some days I'm the fish.

                      Instagram @charles_the_toothsmith

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                      • #12
                        Thank you for the compliments, gentlemen - I guess the good news of not being good at catching trout is that you get lots of time to compose good sentences!

                        Here's to more uglier prose after my next outing.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by iso1600 View Post
                          sorry for the late reply, but just based on everything I've read and heard, Jack's is moderate quality trout water at best. Most of it is lower elevation, higher temps, and going to have other fish like redeye bass.
                          Due to the trail and the falls that are super popular to hike and swim on Jack's, that area in general gets more pressure.
                          I think that combination of factors is what drives heavier regulation there.
                          I was looking and the Jacks used to be a seasonal stream.

                          I guess that is why it does not have the same regulations as the Conasauga. It used to be closed during the winter.

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