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Homemade Strike Indicators

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  • Homemade Strike Indicators

    Just wanted to ask the community if anyone has made strike indicators from egg or polypro yarn similar to a New Zeland type of indicator without using a special tool.

    I have tied some yarn indicators using a rubber O ring in various sizes and would like to hear from anyone doing something similar.

    Thanks in advance for your comments and advice.

    Kelly

  • #2
    Kelly - I use homemade strike indicators, big & bushy stimis that I tie with New Zealand strike indicator wool, orange mostly. Big and gaudy but fish try to eat them all the time.
    RScott

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    • #3
      If you are going to use a strike indicator, it might as well have a hook in it....
      big bushy stimmie
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      • #4
        For years (decades), I've used polypro yarn from a craft store and small orthodontic rubber bands. Loop the leader and run the loop through the rubber band three times. Put a small piece of polypro through the loop and pull the leader until the loop tightens. Cut the resulting polypro puff to size and coat with mucilin or dry fly liquid floatent (or precoat before using). You can slide this up and butt half of the leader with no problem.

        It's very sensitive. I think better than a thingamabobber for detecting strikes. But not as convenient. Plus more wind resistant and flies can get hooked in the yarn when casting.

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        • #5
          Meaux makes these just like you've described. She even made her own vise to whip them up from a bench mounted tool vise and a pair of needle nose vise grips. She loves 'em and is determined to make me abandon my Thing-a-ma-bobbers in favor of her yarn indicators. If she continues to out fish me as is her habit, I may just make the change.
          Last edited by Swamp Angel; 04-02-16, 05:25 PM.
          If you have difficulty understanding the post above, read it out loud and it should make sense. This NGTO member is known for his poor hill-billy upbringing and his affinity for all things from Louisiana (particularly if it relates to LSU). It makes for a poor mix of accents and much difficulty in translation. He was doing well for so long, but now seems to have regressed.

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          • #6
            Check out this indicator system http://www.strikeindicator.com/ It looks really neat to me so I just ordered the kit, the extra tubing and the extra bag of colored wool. I will let you know how I like it after it arrives.
            I know where they live, I know what they eat. Now it's time to fool them with thread, feathers and roadkill.


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            • #7
              Originally posted by Prowler View Post
              Check out this indicator system http://www.strikeindicator.com/ It looks really neat to me so I just ordered the kit, the extra tubing and the extra bag of colored wool. I will let you know how I like it after it arrives.
              The New zeland indicator is definetly a neat system. I like it because it is very stealthy, casts easily, and is adjustable- not only for depth but for the size of the indicator. It however will not replace my thingamabobbers, it is just not capable of floating a high amount of wieght.

              For spooky fish, tailwater fish, and wild fish- were you are looking to float midges, small PTs, and other smaller stuff they the NZ indicator are great. for lots of split shot and heavy flies, i will stick to thingamabobber's. Each has an important place in the toolbox- or rather tacklebox.
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              • #8
                Originally posted by ferrulewax View Post
                The New zeland indicator is definetly a neat system. I like it because it is very stealthy, casts easily, and is adjustable- not only for depth but for the size of the indicator. It however will not replace my thingamabobbers, it is just not capable of floating a high amount of wieght.

                For spooky fish, tailwater fish, and wild fish- were you are looking to float midges, small PTs, and other smaller stuff they the NZ indicator are great. for lots of split shot and heavy flies, i will stick to thingamabobber's. Each has an important place in the toolbox- or rather tacklebox.
                Thanks fw. I think I will like it. I am getting it for small stuff. If I get into heavy flies, I will be euro nymphing and using my normal 2 foot sighter. I think it will be great for fishing 6x or 7x and a couple size 18 midges.
                I know where they live, I know what they eat. Now it's time to fool them with thread, feathers and roadkill.


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                • #9
                  Using the NZ Strike Indicator with very small flies makes since, but how do you get tiny flies down into the strike zone in water such as the hooch other than to add weight, which would probably cause the NZ Strike Indicator to sink. I purchased a NZ Strike Indicator last week, tried it on the Hooch this week and it floated only a short distance before sinking. I switched back to a thingamabobber. Maybe I should have trimmed the strike indicator, made it into a ball, added floatant. I intend to give it another try and do all of this, but the advertisements for the NZ Strike Indicator seemed to indicate the strike indicator would float for sometime before floatant was necessary.
                  "Why me Lord what have I ever done to deserve even one of the pleasures I've known" - Kris Kristofferson

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by HILLIS LANIER View Post
                    Using the NZ Strike Indicator with very small flies makes since, but how do you get tiny flies down into the strike zone in water such as the hooch other than to add weight, which would probably cause the NZ Strike Indicator to sink. I purchased a NZ Strike Indicator last week, tried it on the Hooch this week and it floated only a short distance before sinking. I switched back to a thingamabobber. Maybe I should have trimmed the strike indicator, made it into a ball, added floatant. I intend to give it another try and do all of this, but the advertisements for the NZ Strike Indicator seemed to indicate the strike indicator would float for sometime before floatant was necessary.
                    Hillis what size tippet are you using? You would be surprised how quickly a size 18 midge with a 2.5 mm tungsten bead will sink using 6x or smaller tippet. Even at 5x it sinks pretty quickly, especially given most of the water on the hooch is moderate with respect to current speed.
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                    • #11
                      Thanks for the guidance Big T. I was using 5x tippet and probably too much weight because I thought that was necessary to get the flies down in heavy current, and I thought the Hooch was considered heavy current. Most of my flies are not tungsten, so I usually add some weight. Maybe I do not need to add the weight. I plan to give the NZ Strike Indicator another try, follow your guidance and see if that works.
                      "Why me Lord what have I ever done to deserve even one of the pleasures I've known" - Kris Kristofferson

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by HILLIS LANIER View Post
                        Thanks for the guidance Big T. I was using 5x tippet and probably too much weight because I thought that was necessary to get the flies down in heavy current, and I thought the Hooch was considered heavy current. Most of my flies are not tungsten, so I usually add some weight. Maybe I do not need to add the weight. I plan to give the NZ Strike Indicator another try, follow your guidance and see if that works.
                        I heard rumors that the great Hillis Lanier was fishing at the dam up near the boat ramp the other day. If you were in that area you should not need that much weight to get down pretty quick, and 5x should be Ok but you might want to try out 6x. Just make sure your hook set is a short crisp set so you don't break off. That is the biggest adjusment I have made as I have gone to lighter tippet.
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                        • #13
                          Thanks Big T.
                          "Why me Lord what have I ever done to deserve even one of the pleasures I've known" - Kris Kristofferson

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by HILLIS LANIER View Post
                            Using the NZ Strike Indicator with very small flies makes since, but how do you get tiny flies down into the strike zone in water such as the hooch other than to add weight, which would probably cause the NZ Strike Indicator to sink. I purchased a NZ Strike Indicator last week, tried it on the Hooch this week and it floated only a short distance before sinking. I switched back to a thingamabobber. Maybe I should have trimmed the strike indicator, made it into a ball, added floatant. I intend to give it another try and do all of this, but the advertisements for the NZ Strike Indicator seemed to indicate the strike indicator would float for sometime before floatant was necessary.
                            The strike indicator shouldn't sink fishing small midges. Last time out, I used a dry fly parachute adams tied with the parachute made out of indicator yarn and it floated all day long and that is with the weight of the hook so the NZ system should float even better than that. My NZ system came in the other day so I plan on using it this wednesday. I will let you know how it works for me.
                            I know where they live, I know what they eat. Now it's time to fool them with thread, feathers and roadkill.


                            ------Team Norvise------
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                            • #15
                              I've been looking for a good 'recipe' for tying a Strike Indicator/Stimi fly.
                              Anyone have a link to one?

                              Whenever I do 'dry-dropper' i feel like my Dry is just constantly sinking because my bottom flies are too heavy.
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