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  • #16
    Ask Bill if you can stick the tip of a brand new, varnish just dried, 'boo rod in a ceiling fan....
    BE DIFFERENT AND MAKE A DIFFERENCE! <

    Exodus 29:18
    Then burn the entire ram on the altar. It is a burnt offering to the LORD, a pleasing aroma, a food offering presented to the LORD. God loves BBQ!

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    • #17
      Cucaracha,
      This is an interesting point. I currently have a 7'9" 5wt. and 7'9" 3wt. Both rods that I dearly love to use. The 5wt. has worked great in Idaho on the Henry's Fork, Snake and Teton rivers on fish up to 22". It has also served well on the Soque and Noontootla rivers here i GA. The 3wt is just awesome on the DH/stocked waters and the smaller blue lines I occasionally have the opportunity to pursue brookies.

      What might be some suggestions for this rod in July? I do not do salt water fishing. I am considering a 7wt. because I hooked a fish in Idaho that we tangled with for 17 minutes and could not get it up. When the line broke it was frayed as if we got pulled under or against a deep rock.

      FishinPreacher, I remember the story at the last boo festival up on the Toccoa about Bill "showing" the strength of the newly made rods in the ceiling fan!

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      • #18
        Originally posted by eyeflyfish View Post
        Cucaracha,
        This is an interesting point. I currently have a 7'9" 5wt. and 7'9" 3wt. Both rods that I dearly love to use. The 5wt. has worked great in Idaho on the Henry's Fork, Snake and Teton rivers on fish up to 22". It has also served well on the Soque and Noontootla rivers here i GA. The 3wt is just awesome on the DH/stocked waters and the smaller blue lines I occasionally have the opportunity to pursue brookies.

        What might be some suggestions for this rod in July? I do not do salt water fishing. I am considering a 7wt. because I hooked a fish in Idaho that we tangled with for 17 minutes and could not get it up. When the line broke it was frayed as if we got pulled under or against a deep rock.

        FishinPreacher, I remember the story at the last boo festival up on the Toccoa about Bill "showing" the strength of the newly made rods in the ceiling fan!
        The last one I did was an 8' 6wt. I built that specifically to catch some pellet pigs on some private water I fish. I have pulled in some fat 22" with no problem so I'm sure it would handle those Idaho trout just fine. And the tips were much easier to sand! That rod that went through the ceiling fan test was actually my rod and I still use that one today.

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        • #19
          If I recall, Bill told our group that you have to put aside the modern notions of the "weight" of your rod when it comes to bamboo. I believe he gave an example of a 6 weight bamboo being similar to a 4 weight Sage.
          I built a 7-9 four wt. I love it, but I recognize that while it's wonderful on the firehole, it's not something I'm going to fish on the Madison at 3 dollar.
          Last edited by AK Pipeline; 12-07-17, 03:40 PM.
          http://southernhighlandsflyrod.blogspot.com/

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          • #20
            Originally posted by AK Pipeline View Post
            If I recall, Bill told our group that you have to put aside the modern notions of the "weight" of your rod when it comes to bamboo. I believe he gave an example of a 6 weight bamboo being similar to a 4 weight Sage.
            I built a 7-9 four wt. I love it, but I recognize that while it's wonderful on the firehole, it's not something I'm going to fish on the Madison at 3 dollar.
            Interesting. I've never heard that and do not recall him mentioning that in any of my classes. But then again, I never was an honor student when it came to paying attention.

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            • #21
              I believe he must have been referring to the slower action of the bamboo rods when compared to graphite rods. There is no doubt that bamboo rods are typically heavier (excepting hollow built rods) than modern graphite rods.

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              • #22
                I have always wanted to take this class and will some day make it a reality. I can't help but wonder if it's the same cost, possibly cheaper, to just purchase a rod from Bill? Factor in missing a weeks work, lodging and meals on top of the $1500+ for the class and you've got to be around 4-5k
                https://www.youtube.com/user/Georgia...?feature=watch

                My biggest worry is that when I'm dead my wife will sell my fishing gear for what I said I paid for it. ~Koos Brandt

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by Big Browns View Post
                  I have always wanted to take this class and will some day make it a reality. I can't help but wonder if it's the same cost, possibly cheaper, to just purchase a rod from Bill? Factor in missing a weeks work, lodging and meals on top of the $1500+ for the class and you've got to be around 4-5k
                  Kind of an apples and oranges thing Ron. It depends on what you are looking for. The class provides you the unique experience of building your own cane rod from scratch. Not many people on the planet can say they have done this! You leave with a beautiful fully functional rod that you built yourself.

                  But if your real desire is to own a rod built by a master rod maker, then have Bill build you one.
                  Message sent from your mom's bedroom during pillow talk

                  Buck Henry
                  Simple Goat Herder
                  Former NGTO President
                  Hall of Fame Member

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                  • #24
                    I have always wanted to take this class and will some day make it a reality. I can't help but wonder if it's the same cost, possibly cheaper, to just purchase a rod from Bill? Factor in missing a weeks work, lodging and meals on top of the $1500+ for the class and you've got to be around 4-5k
                    I understand the cost analysis associated with these rods. I have two that Bill made and they have changed my entire perspective and ability in fly fishing. I am taking the class more for what Buck expressed in that I will experience making a rod and using it myself. Ultimately it will be the rod my wife uses to fish in ponds as she cannot wade in streams and as my back up rod.

                    My understanding is it is also an epic week of experiences with other like minded sportsman.

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                    • #25
                      I attended in Feb of last year. One word - AWESOME! It is a lot of information, but Bill and Riley are excellent teachers. It is also a lot of work and hours, but there is a nice refrigerator in the back with a tap on top so.......

                      Seriously, go in with an open mind, take lots of notes, and enjoy. They say the birth of your children, wedding, etc. are supposed to be the monumental days of your life. They are wrong (LOL) Holding a finished rod, you built yourself, in the basement at Harvest on Main on Saturday night is truly one of the best days you will experience.

                      The knowledge and friendships you leave with are forever. Enjoy!

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                      • #26
                        Oyster Bamboo - Make your own

                        So, I attended the class a few years ago. Rented a cabin on the lower Tocoa River. Went to class during the day and fished in the evenings. Lots of other places to fish nearby, as well. As was previously stated, the number of hours you put in depends somewhat on your capabilities and the capabilities of the rest of the class. People work at different paces and that is where the keg comes into play.

                        Be careful. After attending the class, I built a few rods at another guys shop. He was kind enough to let me build rods for myself if I also built one to donate to charity. I have since set up my own shop and am in the process of building my 14th and 15th rods. I kept some, gave one to my uncle who got me started fishing and fueled my passion for it. Also, sold a couple and donated 3 to different charities. I still have 5 at the house. This fish in my avitar was a 28Ē rainbow that I caught in Alaska on my Oyster class rod. Also made a 8.5í 9 wgt that I used in Alaska to land a 25 lb king salmon.

                        You will not be disappointed. I certainly was not.

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                        • #27
                          Well I'm only 4 weeks away. After talking with my guide I use on the Toccoa and Riley at the shop, I'm going to attempt an 8' 4wt. I and one other gentleman will be the only first timers in the room.I hope I don't hold the class up!

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                          • #28
                            Donít fret about it. The class pace is such that everyone has time to complete their tasks. If you have any kind of mechanical or woodworking aptitude you will probably be waiting on others. Thatís when you hit the keg.

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                            • #29
                              Any endeavor that requires mental and physical output is going to be taxing, but no one ever succeeded by sitting on the sidelines and taking the easy way out. I have never built a bamboo rod, but it intrigues me nonetheless, and having the opportunity to build your very own 'boo rod under the watchful eyes of Bill Oyster is an opportunity that should not be missed.

                              I have a good friend (via internet and LSU connections who is well known as a bamboo rod restorer - Michael Sinclair). Michael (aka Paducah Mike) sings the highest praises of Bill and his rods.

                              You'll undoubtedly finish the experience with a top notch fly rod and the knowledge you need to build the next one. Not to mention that if this is the only one you ever build you will fully enjoy the experience and relive it every time you land a fish on it.

                              If it's possible, keep a photo record of your progress and keep us updated here. It'll keep us all happy and it'll be a boon to Bill, who has long been one of our sponsors.
                              If you have difficulty understanding the post above, read it out loud and it should make sense. This NGTO member is known for his poor hill-billy upbringing and his affinity for all things from Louisiana (particularly if it relates to LSU). It makes for a poor mix of accents and much difficulty in translation. He was doing well for so long, but now seems to have regressed.

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                              • #30
                                Just don't hit that keg very hard on guide wrapping day! My wraps look like some drunk guy did them!
                                Message sent from your mom's bedroom during pillow talk

                                Buck Henry
                                Simple Goat Herder
                                Former NGTO President
                                Hall of Fame Member

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