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Drift Boat Project #3

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  • #61
    Carl....I see where your disgust of UHMWP popped up here.....just an aside....they make a glue/adhesive that works on it now. I have it on my new StealthCraft from the factory....no fastners what-so-ever.

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    • #62
      Drift Boat Project #3

      Gary....do you recall the name of the adhesive? If not I can contact Stealthcraft. I'm concerned about the screw holes ....the screws holding down the UHMP. There is no evidence anything is amiss....but want to make sure. On a side note....the UHMP shoe on my boat is heavy. If I removed it (and dozens of screws) and glassed the bottom....I'm guessing I'd shave 30 or 40 pounds.

      I think I'm proficient enough with the boat to now remove the shoe for good...and glass the bottom with a couple of layers of epoxy and heavy cloth. I'd leave the UHMP strips on the chimes. They've saved the oak chines more than once...although I do like the idea of the aluminum strips found on the Steele boat.

      On another note....Gary...I enjoyed seeing your wooden drift boat in the Flyfishing Museum in Cherokee. That boat had some neat features I had not seen before. Thanks for your generosity in exhibiting the boat.


      Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
      The Drifter

      The contents of this message might be totally inaccurate, misguided or otherwise perverse. If you are stupid enough to follow any of the tips listed here and mess up yourself or your equipment, I am absolved of all responsibility. The information contained herein is based on my personal experience and by no means constitutes the correct way to do it. Your mileage may vary.

      Follow me on Instagram

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      • #63
        Originally posted by Capt Gary Taylor View Post
        Thank you for posting this Carl. Big Yea! Sounds like you have a piece of history there brother.
        Thanks, my friend! I do blame you exclusively for all this insanity!
        Then Peter said, "I'm going fishing." The disciples replied, we're going too, and they got in the boat..." John 21:3a

        And now, I pray thee, take thy weapons, thy quiver and thy bow, and go out to the field and hunt me venison. Genesis 27:3

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        • #64
          [QUOTE=Drifter;833428] On a side note....the UHMP shoe on my boat is heavy. If I removed it (and dozens of screws) and glassed the bottom....I'm guessing I'd shave 30 or 40 pounds.

          Drifter, although I would advocate for removing it and glassing the bottom with some biaxial, it might not net that much weight savings. Heavy fabric soaks up epoxy and UHMWP floats so it might actually add to the buoyancy of your boat. Well, that might be too strong to say, but you get the idea.
          Then Peter said, "I'm going fishing." The disciples replied, we're going too, and they got in the boat..." John 21:3a

          And now, I pray thee, take thy weapons, thy quiver and thy bow, and go out to the field and hunt me venison. Genesis 27:3

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          • #65
            Coming along nice Carl-looks like you've put a lot of blood, sweat, and tears into it !

            The adhesive for the UHMW sounds interesting-but my biggest issue with it is how brittle it gets over time. That's why the aluminium rub strips on the chines of your boat seemed so appealing to me.

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            • #66
              Here we go...


              Then Peter said, "I'm going fishing." The disciples replied, we're going too, and they got in the boat..." John 21:3a

              And now, I pray thee, take thy weapons, thy quiver and thy bow, and go out to the field and hunt me venison. Genesis 27:3

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              • #67
                Oh man, today was a good day to be alive! I've been nervous about the bottom of this boat for a while now and today my anxiety was finally relieved. I'm NOT going to need to replace it or any part of it.

                There are a couple little damaged spots where a nail crushed the edge of the chine and a couple pushed in dents where it apparently whacked on rocks, but nothing that a little thickened epoxy won't take care of. No rot.

                The skid shoe came off pretty easily with the persuasive ability of nail pullers and pry bars.

                Here are a few nails just begging to come out now:



                Aside from being really, really dry and brittle, the skid shoe was mostly good. A little bashed on the edges, but I bet I could have cleaned it up, puttied it with some epoxy, and reused it if I wanted to. I didn't.



                I should name this boat Lady Tetanus



                Think there were enough nails in it?



                So what we have here is a look at all the stuff that was coating the bottom of this boat. On the far left is a buildup of about 1/4 inch of Bondo and polyester resin that made a ramp up to the skid shoe. Yes - BONDO. And not EPOXY resin but POLYESTER resin: two materials that, within the context of modern times are generally regarded as no-no's in wooden boat building. But apparently somebody thought it was a good idea. And the stuff was actually adhering surprisingly well. It took considerable effort from a 3x21 36 grit sanding belt to convince it to surrender.
                Next you'll see this silver stuff that turns grey when sanded. Don't know what this stuff is.
                It was hard as a rock and was all the way around the perimeter of the shoe to a width of about 2". Some sort of putty type stuff that was maybe used as a bedding compound I guess. Next is the stuff that covered the entire bottom. Polyester resin. No glass matt or cloth or anything like that. Just a fairly thick layer of resin. It seemed to work but it's definitely not the recommended way of sealing a boat. I have a feeling that maybe this boat wasn't used much after its refinishing in who-knows-when.



                Here's another look at the putty stuff after it has been sanded.



                The shoe all the way off and broken in two.It eventually got broken into 6 pieces and is headed to the dump. No time lost on sentimentality.



                Up next... MORE SANDING!! Oh joy!!

                Last edited by Warmouth; 10-17-15, 08:07 PM.
                Then Peter said, "I'm going fishing." The disciples replied, we're going too, and they got in the boat..." John 21:3a

                And now, I pray thee, take thy weapons, thy quiver and thy bow, and go out to the field and hunt me venison. Genesis 27:3

                Comment


                • #68
                  First thing you should see here is this little guy. He's my buddy. For the past two or three weeks, just about every time I work on this boat, he comes out from some cranny to check on what I'm doing. No kidding! He's like my dog. Here I had just shut off the sander and here he came. There have been so many times that I could have fried him with the heat gun, or smushed him with a hammer but he's just too cool. Here he is checking out the sanding dunes.



                  More sanding dunes.



                  I am so stoked about the condition of this wood!





                  I should be saving this for thickening epoxy. But I'm not. I'm too lazy.





                  Feels like real progress today.
                  Then Peter said, "I'm going fishing." The disciples replied, we're going too, and they got in the boat..." John 21:3a

                  And now, I pray thee, take thy weapons, thy quiver and thy bow, and go out to the field and hunt me venison. Genesis 27:3

                  Comment


                  • #69
                    Drift Boat Project #3

                    Wow Carl....it's looking great! That ply looks like it's begging for a heavy dose of epoxy.

                    Refresh my memory....are you going with a new plywood shoe or cloth /graphite combo on the bottom? I know you don't care for the UHMP.

                    I can't wait to see the final product.
                    The Drifter

                    The contents of this message might be totally inaccurate, misguided or otherwise perverse. If you are stupid enough to follow any of the tips listed here and mess up yourself or your equipment, I am absolved of all responsibility. The information contained herein is based on my personal experience and by no means constitutes the correct way to do it. Your mileage may vary.

                    Follow me on Instagram

                    Comment


                    • #70
                      Very interesting in keeping up with your rebuild Carl. It appears as there is no substitute for good ol' elbow grease. With all our modern technology and products, the best, safest and only method is a belt sander and time.
                      I'm curious though, have you used any chemical stripper on this restore?
                      I too can't wait to see the finished boat...bet she will see many many more years of floating rivers.
                      BE DIFFERENT AND MAKE A DIFFERENCE! <

                      Exodus 29:18
                      Then burn the entire ram on the altar. It is a burnt offering to the LORD, a pleasing aroma, a food offering presented to the LORD. God loves BBQ!

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                      • #71
                        Originally posted by Drifter View Post
                        Wow Carl....it's looking great! That ply looks like it's begging for a heavy dose of epoxy.

                        Refresh my memory....are you going with a new plywood shoe or cloth /graphite combo on the bottom? I know you don't care for the UHMP.

                        I can't wait to see the final product.
                        Thank you, sir.

                        Yes, you are right. You can just SEE the dryness of that wood in the pics, can't you? It is the driest wood I have ever seen.

                        I've been toying around with the idea of using a slicked-up, sacrificial plywood shoe. It's still popular in the Pacific NW on framed boats. (And BTW, framed wood boats like yours and mine are still very popular on these gnarly class IV rivers out this way.) As you know, a problem with boats like ours is that the bottom is so stiff between the frames that when there is impact with a rock, the wood can push up and can split on the inside of the boat (if it is a hard enough whack). Fiberglass boats tend to just flex around it and aluminum - well, I have never looked into what aluminum does. I suppose it dents. Aluminum drift boats have no soul so I ignore them. The ply shoe seems to help with some of that, from what I have been reading. It seems to absorb some of that compression shock. What I still don't like about it is the fact that I would do all this work on the boat, saving it from a slow death of rotting away, seal it all up and then penetrate it with a couple hundred nails or screws. I don't like the potential for water to get trapped between the shoe and the bottom either. Knowing myself the way I do, I'd be losing sleep wondering what was going on down there. Did I create a biome for little spore beasties to feast away on my old boat?

                        So... In the end I will most likely go the route you described. My current thinking is to start with the lowest viscosity epoxy I can get and roll it on 'til the wood won't soak up any more. Then lightly sand it to knock down the grain and apply a coat of medium viscosity . Then I'll "tape" the chines with 10 oz cloth. Then I'll use some heavy biaxial - like 24 oz on the bottom, flow coat it with a final epoxy and graphite mix and paint it. The sides will get 10 oz cloth and paint. Sounds expensive, right? Spread the word that I am accepting donations for the Keith Steele Memorial Boat Restoration Fund.

                        What do you think about this plan? If you don't like it, stick around - I'll probably change my mind by the end of the day.
                        Last edited by Warmouth; 10-18-15, 06:39 AM.
                        Then Peter said, "I'm going fishing." The disciples replied, we're going too, and they got in the boat..." John 21:3a

                        And now, I pray thee, take thy weapons, thy quiver and thy bow, and go out to the field and hunt me venison. Genesis 27:3

                        Comment


                        • #72
                          Originally posted by fishnpreacher View Post
                          Very interesting in keeping up with your rebuild Carl. It appears as there is no substitute for good ol' elbow grease. With all our modern technology and products, the best, safest and only method is a belt sander and time.
                          I'm curious though, have you used any chemical stripper on this restore?
                          I too can't wait to see the finished boat...bet she will see many many more years of floating rivers.
                          Thanks Preacher. I appreciate you recognizing what is involved here. I wish I could share some labor-saving secret, but I haven't discovered one. Five different sanders, a heat gun, two different scrapers, various bristle brushes, 161 hours, and a new case of tendonitis in my elbows is the only secret I know. It's kinda like sanctification. There is no quick way to get there. (I say as I am skipping church today.)

                          I have used chemical stripper in a few localized areas: The inside angles of the frames where a power sander won't reach, divots or deeply checked grooves in the wood where sanding would cause a cup, the little nooks where the chine log, frame, floor, and side meet - places like that. I tried using it on the floor because it is just no fun to curl up in the bottom of the boat with a heat gun and scraper but I didn't gain a thing with the stripper. It just didn't work that well. I think the primary reason it doesn't do much has to do with humidity. Living in the south, my experience with stripper was that you brush it on, let it sit for 15-30 minutes and scrape off wet globs of goo. Here is SW Idaho the humidity rarely gets above 18%. Everything dries out. So I put the stripper on and in 10 minutes it's dried out and didn't even have time to react with the paint. It definitely wasn't magic by any means. I prefer heat and sandpaper when possible.
                          Then Peter said, "I'm going fishing." The disciples replied, we're going too, and they got in the boat..." John 21:3a

                          And now, I pray thee, take thy weapons, thy quiver and thy bow, and go out to the field and hunt me venison. Genesis 27:3

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                          • #73
                            If it were my boat... I'd put a 1/4" marine ply on the bottom, simply use it until it wears out, then replace it again. Many go that route and are well pleased.

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                            • #74
                              Originally posted by Troutguy View Post
                              If it were my boat... I'd put a 1/4" marine ply on the bottom, simply use it until it wears out, then replace it again. Many go that route and are well pleased.
                              That is true, Troutguy. And hey, I'm looking forward to seeing your restoration too!
                              Then Peter said, "I'm going fishing." The disciples replied, we're going too, and they got in the boat..." John 21:3a

                              And now, I pray thee, take thy weapons, thy quiver and thy bow, and go out to the field and hunt me venison. Genesis 27:3

                              Comment


                              • #75
                                George Beasley, a notorious guide on the Hiwassee back in the day told me that "the sun don't shine on the same dog's butt all the time" after a run of a bunch of days of great fishing. Well, that might be true but it's shining on this dog right now, and I'll take it. Had another stroke of good fortune today.

                                Inspired by the relative ease by which that skid shoe came off, I decided ignore all the advice, set my jaw, and remove those rub strips. And man, am I glad I did. They came off without much of a fight and I am going to feel so much better about glassing the outside of the hull with them off of there. Now I know I can do it right. A little damage was incurred on the starboard side as a chunk of ply came off with the strip, but it's an easy fix.

                                Drifter... notice the dirt on the garage floor. That is for you.



                                Things are going to be so much easier with these things off. And in one piece too!



                                A little damage to repair with some thickened epoxy.



                                I can't get over the number of fasteners on this boat.




                                And as I'm banging away on this the rub rail, look who comes to say hi. This little guy is a trip!!

                                Then Peter said, "I'm going fishing." The disciples replied, we're going too, and they got in the boat..." John 21:3a

                                And now, I pray thee, take thy weapons, thy quiver and thy bow, and go out to the field and hunt me venison. Genesis 27:3

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