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Boat investment! Is a flycraft reasonable?

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  • Boat investment! Is a flycraft reasonable?

    I am a teenager and I plan on purchasing a boat after i get a job this summer. The flycraft (http://www.flycraftusa.com/) boat has been exploding on the internet and it looks cool but I want somebody knowledge for deciding on the perfect boat for the hooch. I would love to keep the price below 4000. Half the battle is finding a boat. Any help will be appreciated!

    Thanks, Ethan

  • #2
    Hey Ethan... send a PM to Sqain and ask him about it. He just picked up one and seems to love it so far and would be a great one to discuss with. Looks like I may consider buying one as well!

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    • #3
      That would be a good boat for the 'Hooch in that it could stand up to hitting a few rocks and stumps without taking too much damage. Not certain about how you'd want to power it though.

      Pretty much everyone who knows me knows that I love the Gheenoe that I have and I love it for the river. For $2500, my wife and I were able to get a 15'-10" fiberglass boat with trailer and trolling motor. For another $1000 we picked up a 25HP motor with remote steering. (That means we could use a steering wheel and not a tiller attached directly to the motor to drive the boat.) So, for $3500, we were set up really nice for the 'Hooch.

      Prior to our current boat, we had been running a 15'-4" Gheenoe High Sider (it resembled a canoe but was much more stable) with an 8HP motor that scooted us along at a nice 19MPH on smooth water. Again, it was of fiberglass construction, and it ran us $900 for boat, motor, and trailer (used).

      Both these boats were perfect for us on the 'Hooch, and the smaller one provided us with lots of enjoyment in the Okefenokee Swamp. River Hawk makes boats based upon the same basic design and they are quite nice on the 'Hooch as well. (Just ask Da Da's Fishing about his boat.)

      Smaller aluminum hull boats with 6 to 9.9HP motors can also be had for a very reasonable price and their aluminum hulls are able to take a little more beating than the fiberglass hulls should you unexpectedly encounter a rock or tree hidden only a few inches beneath the surface of the water.

      I used to check out the Gheenoes for Sale thread on customgheenoe.com, but have noticed that the prices have gone from a very affordable $800 to $3000 for various models, to a rather expensive $4500 to $13,500 for the boats offered by owners seeking to upgrade to the next model. So I would recommend that if you search for a used Gheenoe or River Hawk in your price range that you do so via craigslist.

      Just keep your eyes and your options open. You never know what blessing may just come along at an opportune time.

      Good luck in your search for the right boat, and when you score it and you are ready to go out and get a feel for the river, shoot me a PM and I'll be glad to walk you through some of the safer sections that provide an enjoyable day of fishing.

      Tight lines!
      If you have difficulty understanding the post above, read it out loud and it should make sense. This NGTO member is known for his poor hill-billy upbringing and his affinity for all things from Louisiana (particularly if it relates to LSU). It makes for a poor mix of accents and much difficulty in translation. He was doing well for so long, but now seems to have regressed.

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      • #4
        Ethan... If you end up finding out more about them I would be interested in hearing it as well. Pretty sure I am going to order one this spring. After watching videos of them in action it's hard to resist


        Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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        • #5
          If you decide to get an aluminium jon boat I would suggest getting one at least 48 inches wide (on the bottom). This width will provide you and your friends with plenty of stability to walk around on the boat.

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          • #6
            I've been eyeing one of these too OP. Keep us updated if you pick one up

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            • #7
              price

              If you're handy, you can buy the raft (Saturn light river raft at boatstogo.com) separate and build your own frame. Total cost should be well under half of what Flycraft is asking.

              Myself, I would have to modify anyway, as I can't handle sitting with my seat that low to the floor (ie knees in the chest).

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              • #8
                Jake Darling and I purchased a Buck's Bags Head Hunter Pontoon last year and really like it. He's done a ton of shoal bass trips in it. It's perfect for rocky, shoalie waters. The price is reasonable and you can handle it easily enough to fish solo from it. We'll be glad to get you the details on ordering one for you. Made in the USA.
                Jimmy Harris
                Unicoi Liars Club
                Unicoi Outfitters Online Store

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                • #9
                  all great advice. My 2 Pesos. Listen to the guys on the thread. No boat can do everything. Had boats from 6 ft to 30 ft. looking at a 50 ft now. No boat does everything.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by everglades355 View Post
                    I am a teenager and I plan on purchasing a boat after i get a job this summer. The flycraft (http://www.flycraftusa.com/) boat has been exploding on the internet and it looks cool but I want somebody knowledge for deciding on the perfect boat for the hooch. I would love to keep the price below 4000. Half the battle is finding a boat. Any help will be appreciated!

                    Thanks, Ethan
                    This is the first time I have seen this boat in particular and holy crap that thing is awesome! My only reluctance with anything that blows up is concerns of a puncture on the water as everything you have in the boat could potentially end up on the bottom of the river but I guess the same can be said for any boat unless it is naturally buoyant. My other concern is longevity; I'm not sure what the life expectancy is on their pontoon material. I am seriously thinking of buying one now... thanks for costing me money If you buy one and need somebody to be your oar man I would be down just for the chance to try it out.
                    "Twenty years from now, you will be more disappointed with the things you didn't do than by the things you didů Explore. Dream. Discover" Mark Twain, 1879

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                    • #11
                      IMHO,

                      If you have something to tow it, and if you are gonna spend that money get a Riverhawk/Gheenoe and motor. Don't waste your time. Rafts are great, but you'll just be cussing about takeouts, getting back up to hung flies/lures, and not being able to hit long, productive stretches of swift river repeatedly.

                      If you want to seriously get after it, being mobile and having the ability to run wherever you want puts alot more fish in the net. I can get my Riverhawk with a jack plate from McGinnis all the way up to Settles, albeit with extremely careful maneuvering and alot of experience.

                      If you are going to be really, really using it it is worth the investment. If you are considering this in High School it tells me you are hard core enough that investing in a motorized craft will bring you TONS of angling opportunities through your college years.

                      The Gheenoe style is perfect for the Hooch, and the fiberglass tends not to be much of an issue so long as you pay attention.
                      I like em big fat and sloppy.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by daviddrummond79 View Post
                        This is the first time I have seen this boat in particular and holy crap that thing is awesome! My only reluctance with anything that blows up is concerns of a puncture on the water as everything you have in the boat could potentially end up on the bottom of the river but I guess the same can be said for any boat unless it is naturally buoyant. My other concern is longevity; I'm not sure what the life expectancy is on their pontoon material. I am seriously thinking of buying one now... thanks for costing me money If you buy one and need somebody to be your oar man I would be down just for the chance to try it out.
                        Out if my own personal curiosity I reached out to fly craft via their "contact us" tab on their website and I'll let the below narrative speak for itself.

                        My question to them;

                        Subject pontoon life expectancy?
                        I see that your warranty for the watercraft is 2 years unless an additional warranty is purchased but I was curious what the life expectancy of the float material is regardless of the warranty i.e. how long could I potentially expect this to last long term? I know there are a lot of variables here to consider but I'm curious about the life expectancy of the adhesives, material deterioration based on time, etc...

                        Their reply;

                        I would estimate a well cared for raft would last 15 - 20 years, possibly longer. the nice thing about glued boats is you can repair them until the end of time. However I am only guessing, I can only go off of my four years of experience with these boats. But I have been really impressed with them so far. We have had zero warranty claims to date.


                        Ben Scribner 801-381-3595

                        Brandon Collett 801-845-6887

                        flycraftusa.com
                        "Twenty years from now, you will be more disappointed with the things you didn't do than by the things you didů Explore. Dream. Discover" Mark Twain, 1879

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                        • #13
                          I am selling my Saturn 13' pvc that i purchased from boatstogo.com. I am asking $400 and that includes a west marine high pressure pump. I paid $1200 and $120 for the pump. I had so much fun with this boat and learned to fly fish on it. I am buying a drift boat and would love for someone on here to enjoy it as much as I did.


                          Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Jimmy Harris View Post
                            Jake Darling and I purchased a Buck's Bags Head Hunter Pontoon last year and really like it. He's done a ton of shoal bass trips in it. It's perfect for rocky, shoalie waters. The price is reasonable and you can handle it easily enough to fish solo from it. We'll be glad to get you the details on ordering one for you. Made in the USA.
                            Jimmy would this handle upper toccoa deep hole on down you think?

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                            • #15
                              It'll handle any fishing stream in Georgia. The upper Toccoa would be a piece of cake.
                              Jimmy Harris
                              Unicoi Liars Club
                              Unicoi Outfitters Online Store

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