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  • Letís talk flyline

    So I got a good deal on a new 8wt setup and am looking into flyline. I havenít gotten into the bass/striper fly game until now so I was wondering what most people use for fly line, either floating or intermediate. I know you can tie on heavier flies to get deeper but is one better than the other in most situations? Iíd mostly be fishing in the hooch and Lanier.
    Aidan Knezo
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  • #2
    Originally posted by aknezo View Post
    So I got a good deal on a new 8wt setup and am looking into flyline. I haven’t gotten into the bass/striper fly game until now so I was wondering what most people use for fly line, either floating or intermediate. I know you can tie on heavier flies to get deeper but is one better than the other in most situations? I’d mostly be fishing in the hooch and Lanier.
    Both Floating and intermediate lines have their place- But if I could only have one, I would choose a floating line. Then, if you need your flies deeper, you can use a longer fluorocarbon leader to help assist your flies sinking. For stripers, tying heavy flies isn't a great option, because it can sink the fly out of the strike zone too quickly- you'll find lots of your eats are when the fly is motionless, sinking slowly or suspending.
    Basically, a Floating line is much more versatile than an intermediate. Particularly if you also wish to fish for large mounths or shoal bass during other parts of the year.

    Some of my my favorite lines for striper fishing are the SA Titan long, Titan, Clear Tip Titan (intermediate), Cortland 444 Big Fly, and Cortland Intermediate Blitz.

    We've got a huge selection of SA lines in the shop- including some great lines for stripers, as well as cortland lines. If there is anything you'd like to look at ordering we'd be happy to do that as well.
    Jackson Dockery
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    • #3
      Originally posted by ferrulewax View Post
      Both Floating and intermediate lines have their place- But if I could only have one, I would choose a floating line. Then, if you need your flies deeper, you can use a longer fluorocarbon leader to help assist your flies sinking. For stripers, tying heavy flies isn't a great option, because it can sink the fly out of the strike zone too quickly- you'll find lots of your eats are when the fly is motionless, sinking slowly or suspending.
      Basically, a Floating line is much more versatile than an intermediate. Particularly if you also wish to fish for large mounths or shoal bass during other parts of the year.

      Some of my my favorite lines for striper fishing are the SA Titan long, Titan, Clear Tip Titan (intermediate), Cortland 444 Big Fly, and Cortland Intermediate Blitz.

      We've got a huge selection of SA lines in the shop- including some great lines for stripers, as well as cortland lines. If there is anything you'd like to look at ordering we'd be happy to do that as well.
      Awesome! That's sort of what I was thinking. I like the idea of having both an intermediate and a floating line but I think I'll probably end up with a floating line with a short taper to start off. The majority of the places I'm fishing all the action is right up near the surface anyway so it kind of makes sense to go with that. I also think with the shorter taper floating line one of Rio's versileaders in a smaller sink rate like 1.5-3 ips would work well to get just a bit deeper.
      Aidan Knezo
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      • #4
        You may want to start w a sinking line since itís getting to be winter and fish will def be deeper. Rio outbound short is my favorite

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        • #5
          Two Cents

          My two cents worth follows great advice so far speaking to the floating line as the best option if you have only one line. But. You see the ads for extra spools so get two lines! Not a lot of people do this but I have come to see all of this as a time to money equation. For most of us, time on the water is very scarce and we need to take maximum advantage of that scarce resource. So if a sinking link can change a so-so or skunked day into a great day, then the extra investment is well worth it.

          Also be aware of line variations to conditions. For example, my first 8wt had a salt water line on it and the idea was to chase inshore redfish and trout. But come spring and a chance to fish a private bass pond was a disaster as that salt water line was so stiff and coiled in the cold you could barely cast it!

          Make wise choices!

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          • #6
            If I had only one I'd definitely go with floating and a cheap alternative to have both is to buy a sink tip you can loop on the your floating line . Floating lines are less work to use than sinking lines for me.
            My experience with sink lines has been the faster they sink the more of a pain they are to cast and pick up to recast.
            Like previously said, sounds like you'll want a line that performs best in colder water.
            I have salt lines designated as cold & tropical water and I have started my change out as the water here yesterday showed 60 degrees on the bottom machine.
            I also really liked RIO lines, but have recently purchased some micro thin lines from Sunray Fly Fish and found them superior to anything I've thrown in the past, I've tried several of the big name lines and thought RIO was the way to go until now.
            They out cast RIO shorts for distance and the thin line lands more like a leader than a bomb, compared to that big fat headed RIO short. I had to try it to believe it but I'm sold now!
            " Is it ignorance or is it apathy?
            Hey man I don't know and I don't care" Jimmy Buffet

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            • #7
              Thanks for the suggestions guys. I went with a floating line for now and bought a full set of Rioís Versileaders to test out. I went with the Rio outbound short since Iíve heard nothing but great things from the people whoíve used it and since the shooting style short head will be better suited for the versileaders. I also read a few articles about how the outbound short is one of the best suited lines for a sage one so I think Iíll be well equipped. I think two setups (floating/intermediate) is a good idea down the line but hopefully for now my ghetto rigged floating like with sink tips will work just fine to catch some of the guys.
              Aidan Knezo
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              • #8
                Originally posted by aknezo View Post
                Thanks for the suggestions guys. I went with a floating line for now and bought a full set of Rioís Versileaders to test out. I went with the Rio outbound short since Iíve heard nothing but great things from the people whoíve used it and since the shooting style short head will be better suited for the versileaders. I also read a few articles about how the outbound short is one of the best suited lines for a sage one so I think Iíll be well equipped. I think two setups (floating/intermediate) is a good idea down the line but hopefully for now my ghetto rigged floating like with sink tips will work just fine to catch some of the guys.
                Good Choice. I love overweight, aggressive heads for bass and stripers- makes for minimal false casts and more time fishing! Right now for stripers You won't need a sinktip. Fish have been feeding pretty high in the water column and the flies haven't needed to be very deep. However, the sink tips will certainly come in handy.
                Jackson Dockery
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                • #9
                  Wished I'd had seen this earlier... I would not opt for a floater for Lanier and the Hooch for stripers and bass. You are MUCH better off with an intermediate and I suggest you get one if you want to be successful on either waterway...

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by henryc View Post
                    Wished I'd had seen this earlier... I would not opt for a floater for Lanier and the Hooch for stripers and bass. You are MUCH better off with an intermediate and I suggest you get one if you want to be successful on either waterway...
                    Really? I'm not questioning your input Henry, believe me, you know a whole lot more about the striper game than I do. But I have been consistently out fished for the past couple weeks by people using floating lines, when I'm throwing an intermediate.

                    Perhaps the choice of intermediate line is at play here, but I think my intermediate gets the fly too low in the column too quickly. Maybe other intermediates would not behave this way. I'm throwing a cortland compact blitz clear tip.

                    Are you throwing the intermediate even as fish move shallow through winter?

                    I'm keen for any information you've got, haha.
                    Jackson Dockery
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                    • #11
                      Rarely do I ever fish a floater unless I am throwing a topwater fly. Which is rare now for both river and lake fishing. I use to be a huge RIO outbound short fan as the lines are a dream to cast. However, with their latest intouch series I feel their lines have gone to crap! The line starts breaking down and cracking and eventually separating the outer core in a very short time period. While RIO has a great warranty department and will replace the line within a year, it is still a hassle to go through. I have swapped over to the SA Titan Clear series for an intermediate line and have been pleased so far. It is also similar in casting as the outbound short. The majority of my fly fishing is with an intermediate line. The second line I use most often is a full fast sink line. I'm now throwing the SA Titan 3/5/7 full sink. I'm pretty much targeting striper fishing year round.
                      Last edited by groundpounder; 12-01-17, 09:36 AM.

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                      • #12
                        In the last report I made on a stellar day on the flats, I was fishing an I-line, I have fished the same flat twice since then both times with a floating line. My thinking was I could pick it up quicker and make another shot or two at the same fish.
                        I did see quite a few fish each time but could not get an eat after trying several patterns, two of which caught fish last Friday in very similar conditions.
                        I have to wonder if that floating line was my issue, while fish would not bolt they seemed more aware of my presence from the Friday trip.
                        I know I got a few in the front of their noses, with not even a look or follow hmm.
                        Wonder if Henry would give an opinion on Intermediate lines for Reds on clear water flats?
                        " Is it ignorance or is it apathy?
                        Hey man I don't know and I don't care" Jimmy Buffet

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by ferrulewax View Post
                          Really? I'm not questioning your input Henry, believe me, you know a whole lot more about the striper game than I do. But I have been consistently out fished for the past couple weeks by people using floating lines, when I'm throwing an intermediate.

                          Perhaps the choice of intermediate line is at play here, but I think my intermediate gets the fly too low in the column too quickly. Maybe other intermediates would not behave this way. I'm throwing a cortland compact blitz clear tip.

                          Are you throwing the intermediate even as fish move shallow through winter?

                          I'm keen for any information you've got, haha.
                          That's debatable Sorry Henry, I couldn't resist.

                          I think there could be other reasons you got outfished, one big one just being the dumb luck of the fish coming up more often near the guys that out fished you. It could also be fly selection, leader material, stripping style, what was on your hands when you tied on your fly, and how you hold your jaw

                          For what its worth, I use a full intermediate for schooling and bank running fish, a full sinker in the dead of winter to try and pry one up from the depths, a floater for poppers/true topwater (rare), and an intermediate tip on the river. I don't like a floater for the schooling fish because it limits me to fishing way up high in the water column, whereas with an intermediate I can always fish up high by starting my strips soon after the cast, or can count it down and fish the stragglers below after the blow up has ended, which picks up a lot of fish. Also, the flies I fish on the lake right now sink very slowly, and a weighted fly on an intermediate (or really any) line can drop out of the zone pretty quickly.

                          FM
                          The tug is the drug!

                          "Grow a pear!" - Groundpounder

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                          • #14
                            I ended up returning all the versileaders and just bought a intermediate line as well. Cause who doesnít want both. But I bought the newer version of the intouch outbound short floating and then the coastal quickshooter XP since the guys at Rio said that would cast most similarly to the outbound short. Iíll see which one works best and go from there. I can see both coming in handy but now I just need to pick up a whole new setup. You guys are getting good at making me spend money.
                            Aidan Knezo
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                            Check out my Flickr

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                            • #15
                              I have yet to own a floating line that doesn't eventually start sinking from the tip up. Now I just use cheap floating lines and coat with mucilin before every outing

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