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Spinning for trouts?

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  • #16
    Originally posted by splatek16 View Post
    I've heard of these trout magnets. Do you toss them on fly or spinning gear, they look small


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    You could put one on the fly rod but they are made for light spin tackle. Try a bobber (play with depth) cast upstream, let it float the run all the way down and swing, slowly reel back up, could get bit on the swing.

    Sent from my SM-G950U using Tapatalk

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    • #17
      Walmart has them if you are interested. TMs are my go to when fishing with a spinning rod. My brother uses a fly rod with them. The assortment color pack is about $10.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by natureman View Post
        Walmart has them if you are interested. TMs are my go to when fishing with a spinning rod. My brother uses a fly rod with them. The assortment color pack is about $10.
        Just to add, I like pink or white for trout magnet

        Sent from my SM-G950U using Tapatalk

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        • #19
          Trout magnets are killer (great for crappie to!). You can jig them thru a slower pool, or dead drift them under an Indy. I imagine a trout magnet with a splitshot or two and a thingymabobber would be quite castable. Think of it as a mop for a spinning rod.

          Sent from my Alcatel_5054O using Tapatalk
          The first thing scripture tells us about man is that we're made in the image of God. The second thing it says is that man should have dominion over the fishes of the sea.

          The right flies at the right time: Monthly Fly

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          • #20
            Cannot Do It Wrong

            You cannot do any of this wrong. Some ways may be easier to learn, but you are getting your kid out there on the water and spending time with him which will only grow more precious over time. My father died when I was eight years old and I till remember going fishing and hunting with him. Great Job There Dad!

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            • #21
              Hey Steve-o!

              For Spencer, in late March, take him to the Rock Creek Hatchery when they start stocking. You can often see pods of stockers in the pools alongside the hatchery. He can fish spinners and watch the trout react to them. Easy access, and it'll be fun for him.

              I take Ivy and my nephews there occasionally. I tell them that I'm just here to cook, and they have to go catch lunch. Go up to the campground between the hatchery and lake, set up a Coleman stove, and peel taters n onions while I wait on the fish to clean. Just a good ol fashioned good time.

              Mepps, Panther Martin, Rooster Tails all work fine!

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              • #22
                I am late adding a comment . I used a blue fox # 2 or #3 copper spinner when i spin fished. I would cast up stream a tad from directly across stream let spinner fall reeling in slowly letting a down stream bow in line which in turn is moving spinner down stream as you reel fast enough to keep spinner from dragging bottom. When line straightens out is when fish would strike. A good example is to observe leaves or other debris rolling along the bottom in current. You want your spinner to mimic the speed of the debris.

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                • #23
                  Thanks y'all.
                  Tried tm and some rooster tail today, but honestly we just had a great time hiking about mile plus down stream, got muddy, saw animals, ate a streamside lunch. Total win when your kids says in the way, "dad, I really like hiking in the wilderness with you, doesn't matter that you can't catch fish"
                  Hilarious.

                  Buckman1 that's on the agenda. I've been eyeballing rock creek for a while.
                  You'll have to convince him to est the trout.
                  He thinks it's kryptonite


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                  • #24
                    Roostertail makes a spinner with a single hook (1/16 oz). I have not seen them locally, but order them through Cabelas. I really like that single hook, especially with kids. I get a few less hookups than a treble, but the hookups I do get stay on better than a treble. So my overall catch rate is about equal. I always keep a moderately fast light powered spinning rod in the raft (Fenwick Eagle GT). The rower and sometimes the rear passenger have enjoyed using it on slow days.

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by Bfish View Post
                      Roostertail makes a spinner with a single hook (1/16 oz). I have not seen them locally, but order them through Cabelas. I really like that single hook, especially with kids. I get a few less hookups than a treble, but the hookups I do get stay on better than a treble. So my overall catch rate is about equal. I always keep a moderately fast light powered spinning rod in the raft (Fenwick Eagle GT). The rower and sometimes the rear passenger have enjoyed using it on slow days.
                      I have a little ultralight with some 4# test (that's what the 'River Through ATL' guide I used for Spence and I recommended) that'll be taking up residence in the truck right next to the telescopic fly rod AKA tenakara.
                      Had quite a learning session today with a few buck chasers. Learning is the best!

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                      • #26
                        The curse on things like Rooster Tail spinner, all in-line spinners, is twisted line. I like small spoons and Super Dupers and things that wobble more than rotate.

                        No shame having a spinning rod, just don't do anything you can't tell mama about.
                        Want to hear God laugh? Tell Him your plans.

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                        • #27
                          I fished the Chattahoochee tailwater from shore one time with my ultralight spinning rod (forgot my pfd and the COE guy reminded me I needed one to wade). The trick for me was to change colors about every 10-15 casts. I would usually get one taker per round of casts, but once they got used to seeing that color, they wouldn't touch it. Switching colors renewed their interest. I caught 8 or 9 from the same run right next to the small parking lot. All I had was rooster tails and they worked great. I was fishing across/up the current as slowly as I could to keep the blade spinning.

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                          • #28
                            Stop Twist

                            If your line is twisting, try using a small barrel swivel. Tie it to the spinning line, then add a foot or two of "tippet" and tie the spinner on that way. Also if you can find clear, long oval shaped plastic floats you can expand options. These floats have a hollow tube that goes down the middle of the float carrying the line, then the float is filled with enough water to provide casting weight. If you thread the float on the spinning line, then the barrel swivel, you can add "tippet" up to about the length of the rod. You can cast itty-bitty spinners and even flies. We used to do this in Colorado on stock tanks out on the plains.

                            In a larger size, I use this set up for salt water bait fishing. I add a sinker between the float and the bait, but you cast a mile but keep the bait moving and off the bottom for a more natural presentation.

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by JOHNKIES View Post
                              If your line is twisting, try using a small barrel swivel. Tie it to the spinning line, then add a foot or two of "tippet" and tie the spinner on that way. Also if you can find clear, long oval shaped plastic floats you can expand options. These floats have a hollow tube that goes down the middle of the float carrying the line, then the float is filled with enough water to provide casting weight. If you thread the float on the spinning line, then the barrel swivel, you can add "tippet" up to about the length of the rod. You can cast itty-bitty spinners and even flies. We used to do this in Colorado on stock tanks out on the plains.

                              In a larger size, I use this set up for salt water bait fishing. I add a sinker between the float and the bait, but you cast a mile but keep the bait moving and off the bottom for a more natural presentation.
                              This is why I prefer Mepps. No twisting as the blade spinner moves separately from the wire tied to your line.

                              Sent from my SM-G950U using Tapatalk

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                              • #30
                                ...I am a long-time Panther Martin user... "Hi Jimmy"...

                                ...I like the ones with hackle in gold and black, or the rainbow trout pattern...sometimes a silver and black...

                                Happy Wanderings!

                                Blessings!

                                Jimmy

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