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Spinning for trouts?

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  • #31
    Jig fishing is a good technique to add to your spin aresenal. Widely popular on the White River for low water, and this is basically how I fish streamers on spin gear.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fap4NyTjIao

    Ive never fished jerkbaits from the shore, but they work from a boat. Ive also had good luck just steady reeling them like a crankbait.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0ec7C_rDGns

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    • #32
      spinning for trout

      I target large fish. My waterways are typically bigger with lots of debris in the water. This type of fishing you need a stout line/rod/reel. I use 8 pound power pro on a medium action 6'6" fenwick with a 2500 shimano stradic reel.

      I am a Panther Martin guy. Size 9s.

      I need the stout line and rod to get the fish's head up right away. My rig is so sensitive I can feel the blade quit spinning.

      I fish the large streams in Wisconsin's driftless area and have for 55 years.
      Attached Files
      http://lenharris.blogspot.com/

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      • #33
        56 years
        Attached Files
        http://lenharris.blogspot.com/

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        • #34
          deeper water no logs

          use swivel

          second smallest
          Attached Files
          http://lenharris.blogspot.com/

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          • #35
            I am typically panther man but will throw a stick bait but not often.

            single hooked spinners come through the water wrong. The treble acts as a rudder.
            Attached Files
            http://lenharris.blogspot.com/

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            • #36
              https://lenharris.blogspot.com/2018/...ite-trout.html
              http://lenharris.blogspot.com/

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              • #37
                Spinner dropping the atomic knowledge bomb! Thanks man.

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                • #38
                  As a rule of thumb, anything you'd throw at river bass will catch brown trout with fair consistency.

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                  • #39
                    rooster tails have too small of trebles for big browns and often have blades quit spinning.

                    panther martin has a problem with blade flop overs and mono can get marred and launch lures.

                    I use mepps on big lake browns with good success.

                    power pro eliminates line twist.
                    http://lenharris.blogspot.com/

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                    • #40
                      Originally posted by spinner View Post
                      rooster tails have too small of trebles for big browns and often have blades quit spinning.

                      panther martin has a problem with blade flop overs and mono can get marred and launch lures.

                      I use mepps on big lake browns with good success.

                      power pro eliminates line twist.
                      Woo woooo one more for the mepps train

                      Sent from my SM-G950U using Tapatalk

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                      • #41
                        Not Yet Mentioned

                        Not yet mentioned is one of my selections for the "stranded in the wilds and only allowed one fishing lure", the Beetle Spin in various colors and sizes.

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                        • #42
                          Originally posted by Dylar View Post
                          As a rule of thumb, anything you'd throw at river bass will catch brown trout with fair consistency.

                          What part of the water column do you like? I've been working my way down and I think next time out I'm gonna try and straight up drag some bass jigs on the bottom and see what I pick up.

                          Always thought trout came up to feed and I spent alot of time fishing the top 3rd or top half, which produced some good fish, but bait fishing dead sculpin on the White really opened my eyes to the lower part of the water column. Focusing in on that lower water of the Hooch, that I had been ignoring, and fishing something of a jig presentation where you can get the rig deep has treated me very well.

                          I'm also all about trying something different that they've never seen before. How many gold inline spinners riding at 1 to 2 ft deep has a mature fish in the Hooch seen? A thousand. Now, how many pumpkinseed baby brushhogs has he seen? How many white Texas rigged super flukes?

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                          • #43
                            http://lenharris.blogspot.com/

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                            • #44
                              Originally posted by JerryG View Post
                              What part of the water column do you like? I've been working my way down and I think next time out I'm gonna try and straight up drag some bass jigs on the bottom and see what I pick up.

                              Always thought trout came up to feed and I spent alot of time fishing the top 3rd or top half, which produced some good fish, but bait fishing dead sculpin on the White really opened my eyes to the lower part of the water column. Focusing in on that lower water of the Hooch, that I had been ignoring, and fishing something of a jig presentation where you can get the rig deep has treated me very well.

                              I'm also all about trying something different that they've never seen before. How many gold inline spinners riding at 1 to 2 ft deep has a mature fish in the Hooch seen? A thousand. Now, how many pumpkinseed baby brushhogs has he seen? How many white Texas rigged super flukes?

                              Really wish we had a like button on this forum right now. I dig what you are saying here.

                              Sent from my SM-G950U using Tapatalk

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                              • #45
                                In a lot of Appalachian freestone streams, 50% or more of the aggregate biomass consumed by larger brown trout over the course of the year consists of crayfish. Not sure how that translates to a tailwater, but I'd bet Leroy is eating a lot of crawdads in them, too. If you're looking for something a little more subtle maybe than a bass jig, you might consider drop shotting a tube.

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