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Scouting Bedrock

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  • Scouting Bedrock

    So, as many blueliners know, sometimes the further upstream you go, the better the fishing and more wide open the creek. My question is, how do you scout this without crawling miles through rhodo hell to find a quarter mile of fishable water?
    -skunked

    Warning: all posts should be assumed to contain sarcasm and misinformation unless stated otherwise. The opinions shared are not necessarily those of the poster.

  • #2
    Originally posted by I_got_skunked View Post
    So, as many blueliners know, sometimes the further upstream you go, the better the fishing and more wide open the creek. My question is, how do you scout this without crawling miles through rhodo hell to find a quarter mile of fishable water?
    Look for Steve Hudson's book - "Bluelining 101" (Here is an Amazon link: http://a.co/b5ZWhdB). In that book, he gives a good guide for how to read topo maps, etc. for doing some at-home research before heading out to fight the vines.

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    • #3
      Did Steve specifically mention bedrock?

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      • #4
        Close together v's should mean a high gradient area, I understand, but is it necessarily indicative of anything more substantial regarding openness of the creek? I've found that gets me to the right stream and maybe even general area, but not necessarily the right spot on the stream. Having to put feet on the ground has been my only way of making that determination, just wondering if anyone has anything more specific. That being said, I haven't read that book as I've been disappointed by the lack of information in other books recommended on this forum.
        -skunked

        Warning: all posts should be assumed to contain sarcasm and misinformation unless stated otherwise. The opinions shared are not necessarily those of the poster.

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        • #5
          If the topo work you've done isn't sufficient (and you've looked for a solution in satellite images), I think you've found the answer; you have to go and look.
          And that's what I'd expect based on my experience; things can be very tight based on vagaries of vegetation and rock around a run or a pool, and a bunch of branches out 2-3 feet over the stream might effectively close off an otherwise promising spot.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Upstream View Post
            If the topo work you've done isn't sufficient (and you've looked for a solution in satellite images), I think you've found the answer; you have to go and look.

            And that's what I'd expect based on my experience; things can be very tight based on vagaries of vegetation and rock around a run or a pool, and a bunch of branches out 2-3 feet over the stream might effectively close off an otherwise promising spot.


            +1



            Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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            • #7
              Originally posted by The Snag Whisperer View Post
              Did Steve specifically mention bedrock?
              I don't think he specifically calls out bedrock. Just thinking about how he discusses the difference in gradients. Based on that knowledge, if I saw a flat gradient sandwiched between steeper gradients above and below, I would assume (but you know what happens when you assume) that there is harder rock in the flat section there that is preventing the heavier erosion above and below that section.

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              • #8
                Bedrock = the Holy Grail of gold prospecting if you need another reason .
                Catch the energy
                Release the potential

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