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  • Getting caught in trees.

    When ever i'm fishing in relatively tight places i seem to always get caught in the trees. How can i keep this from happening?
    Matthew 5:14

  • #2
    Learn to roll cast!
    Message sent from your mom's bedroom during pillow talk

    Buck Henry
    Simple Goat Herder
    Former NGTO President
    Hall of Fame Member

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    • #3
      learn to roll cast and also if you feeling like you want a good challenge youtube single handed spey casting...its fun to learn and can definitely help with the trees...
      I use dry flies...why just for the chance of the perfect cast, perfect drift, just to see it disappear...and then FISH ON!!!!

      2010 Fall Fling Hero Shot Winner - 73'
      2011 Spring Fling Hero Shot Winner - 84' (91' Practice)

      Southern Fly Fishing
      http://southernflyfishing1530.wordpress.com

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      • #4
        And on hook sets - don't raise the rod! Sweep it downstream, parallel to the water. Even if it's a false alarm you won't be aiming for tall timber.

        Want to Help Ease DNR's Budget Woes? Buy a TU license Plate!

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        • #5
          youtube single handed spey casting
          Great advice. I use this cast a great deal, and on a larger piece of water if there's little room for a backcast you can really fling some shot and a couple of flies out there a ways without tangles....

          Try this one:

          http://www.hook.tv/player.php?key=A90FC5B3A9EF9DE9
          sigpicAKA oldandtreacherous
          "Good things come to those who wade." John 6:37

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          • #6
            You can't....... but a good roll cast or even better a very tight loop will help.

            A better trick might be is getting your fly "unstuck" without spookin the hole.
            If you can reach the fly, try running the tip of you rod all the way to the fly where it is stuck and wiggeling it loose. If you can do that without spookin the hole too much..... you may still get a few more good casts in.
            KB

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            • #7
              Bow and arrow cast in reeeeally tight spots....check youtube as well.

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              • #8
                side arm water haul

                Originally posted by feeding frenzy53 View Post
                When ever i'm fishing in relatively tight places i seem to always get caught in the trees. How can i keep this from happening?
                Overhang gets everybody. To avoid that keep your line low to the water.

                Stand in the stream near the opposite bank from where you intend to fish. With your rod pointed downstream let your rig drift straight downstream from you about the same distance as it is to your target. Make a side arm casting stroke about 1' off the water towards your target.

                The water will put tension in the line to bend your rod and cast your rig low above the water when it breaks free. Practice going straight upstream to get the hang of it.

                You can also practice by walking in grass to simulate the stream. Clean your line after.

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                • #9
                  shorter rod

                  Helps me to use 7' rod in smaller streams and no false casting.
                  "Often, I have been exhausted on trout streams, uncomfortable, wet, cold, briar scarred, sunburned, mosquito-bitten, but never, with a fly rod in my hand, have I been in a place that was less than beautiful."

                  ~by Charles Kuralt-1990~

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                  • #10
                    Hate to sound like a wiseazz, but look behind you before starting your casting motion.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by MariettaMike View Post
                      Overhang gets everybody. To avoid that keep your line low to the water.

                      Stand in the stream near the opposite bank from where you intend to fish. With your rod pointed downstream let your rig drift straight downstream from you about the same distance as it is to your target. Make a side arm casting stroke about 1' off the water towards your target.

                      The water will put tension in the line to bend your rod and cast your rig low above the water when it breaks free. Practice going straight upstream to get the hang of it.

                      You can also practice by walking in grass to simulate the stream. Clean your line after.
                      This is referred to as a "water haul" and is an extremely effective way of dealing with obstructions behind you.

                      You can speed up this process by actually casting directly down stream and when your line and leader have straightened out and your rod is pointed downstream...then do a back cast type motion towards your upstream target. No false casts..just haul it and let it land. Don't leave the fly and indicator in the downstream position for long...it will eventually hang up on something.

                      As Mike says, the tension of the line against the water will load your rod and the line will break free from the water and fly in whatever direction you have pointed your rod. I find this more fun and easier to control than roll casting.

                      When I was teaching my son to fly fish this is one of the first techniques I taught him on the Chattooga...he learned this quickly and the bitching about the trees behind us stopped. He never did learn to roll cast.

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                      • #12
                        Its no different than golf and water. The first thing I do at the golf course is throw 2 balls into the lake to satisfy the golf Gods. When you get to the river hang 2 flies in the trees to satisfy the Trout Gods then go fishing
                        "Fly Fishing Is Not A Team Sport"----Tom McGuane

                        The fisherman now is one who defies society, who rips lips, who drains the pool, who takes no prisoners, who is not to be confused with the sissy with the creel and bamboo rod. Granted, he releases what he catches, but in some cases, he strips the quarry of its perilous soul before tossing it back in the water. What was once a trout – cold, hard, spotted and beautiful – becomes “number seven.”
                        Tom McGuane

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