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Proper Hauling for Distance

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  • Proper Hauling for Distance

    I'm kind of embarrassed asking this, when distance casting (specifically 60+ ft) on the first few hauls should line be let out like almost a preliminary cast then hauled again, in essence more line being let out with each haul gradually. I've seen it done like this and with just hauls where it seems like no line is being worked out. I've tried both and letting out line gets somewhat difficult with timing, loop contol, and rod action.

    Thanks,
    GU.
    We are the music-makers,
    And we are the dreamers of dreams,
    Wandering by lone sea-breakers
    And sitting by desolate streams;
    World losers and world forsakers,
    On whom the pale moon gleams.

  • #2
    It depends.

    If the line you are using is a "standard" line, then yes, you work a little out on each false cast, and more distance requires more false casts.

    If you are using a "shooting head" type line, like a Rio Outbound Short, the head is heavier and the running line after the head is thinner than a standard line, both making the line easier to shoot with fewer false casts. The downside, if you are not good at shooting line, is that the thin running line is not capable supporting the shooting head, and so excessive false casts and paying out line will allow your cast to collapse if much more than the shooting head is out of the guides and your timing isn't perfect.

    The basic difference is with a standard line you carry more line in the air, and increase the amount with each successive false cast, and shoot a little more at the end. With a shooting head, you can't carry a bunch of line in the air, but the heavier head loads the rod quickly and you don't need to carry a lot of line to shoot a lot of line, or to make a lot of false casts.

    So, shooting heads are really a specialty line primarily for streamer fishing, to cut down on false casts, and to expend less energy over a long day of casting (less strokes). You wouldn't use one for an all around line, where you want to nymph, then high stick, the fish dries, ie, a standard line is much more versatile.

    FM
    The tug is the drug!

    "Grow a pear!" - Groundpounder

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    • #3
      Fishmonger's explanation was spot-on.


      The closest I've come to a do-it-all line has been an "easy mend" line in my rod's rated weight. But even then, as FM mentions, lots of line must be carried in the air.


      "Easy mend" lines usually have heads extended by really long rear tapers.

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      • #4
        What has already been said is certainly spot on. Another thing I will add is learn to shoot on your backcast as well as your foreward cast. This not only lessens the number of false casts you need, but also helps to apply an even larger load to your rod for more power on the forward cast. Just be careful of overshooting the back cast because it will overpower your rod if you aren't careful.
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        • #5
          Originally posted by fishmonger View Post
          It depends.

          If the line you are using is a "standard" line, then yes, you work a little out on each false cast, and more distance requires more false casts.

          If you are using a "shooting head" type line, like a Rio Outbound Short, the head is heavier and the running line after the head is thinner than a standard line, both making the line easier to shoot with fewer false casts. The downside, if you are not good at shooting line, is that the thin running line is not capable supporting the shooting head, and so excessive false casts and paying out line will allow your cast to collapse if much more than the shooting head is out of the guides and your timing isn't perfect.

          The basic difference is with a standard line you carry more line in the air, and increase the amount with each successive false cast, and shoot a little more at the end. With a shooting head, you can't carry a bunch of line in the air, but the heavier head loads the rod quickly and you don't need to carry a lot of line to shoot a lot of line, or to make a lot of false casts.

          So, shooting heads are really a specialty line primarily for streamer fishing, to cut down on false casts, and to expend less energy over a long day of casting (less strokes). You wouldn't use one for an all around line, where you want to nymph, then high stick, the fish dries, ie, a standard line is much more versatile.

          FM
          Thats great you kind of read my mind with what I was trying to have answered but just asked it poorly. Been using the triple D lines and it has helped drastically. My biggest opponent is myself trying to remedy with extra unnecessary movements instead letting the line do the work like the extra reach at the completion of the cast is almost a crutch for me or dropping the arm and working against the line. Exactly what is happening with me with collapsescthat you mentioned. One of the biggest issue I seem to have, is finding that sweet spot that would maximize the full potential of a distance cast. Trying to figure out how much line to have off the reel, how much should let out between hauls, where the best workable location on the fly line is ( I know this will vary with lines but I probably need to have some system in place to get to that workable area for consistency).

          Originally posted by ferrulewax View Post
          What has already been said is certainly spot on. Another thing I will add is learn to shoot on your backcast as well as your foreward cast. This not only lessens the number of false casts you need, but also helps to apply an even larger load to your rod for more power on the forward cast. Just be careful of overshooting the back cast because it will overpower your rod if you aren't careful.
          Glad you brought this up I get a bump on my back cast frequently and it really messes me up especially on heavier flies. The shooting backcast I have an issue with is timing and when to haul back. Often I will almost do a stop tug with back cast to try to redirect and this messses me up. Lately Iíve been going more Belgian style casting but this is probably another bandaid that shifts my casting plane. I would say 75% of the time my arms are flailing around like Iím trying to flag down a car or conduct and orchestra.
          We are the music-makers,
          And we are the dreamers of dreams,
          Wandering by lone sea-breakers
          And sitting by desolate streams;
          World losers and world forsakers,
          On whom the pale moon gleams.

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          • #6
            Peter Kurtzer with Orvis has some excellent short videos on YouTube about double hauling that are super quick and easy and very helpful
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            • #7
              Another tip is to let the rod do the work. DO NOT OVER PUSH THE ROD! It is possible to break a rod on a cast.
              By this I'm meaning do not try and power a cast to get more distance.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by groundpounder View Post
                Another tip is to let the rod do the work. DO NOT OVER PUSH THE ROD! It is possible to break a rod on a cast.
                By this I'm meaning do not try and power a cast to get more distance.
                Remember that the stroke speed does not go from 0-100 immediately. It should be a stop, speed up, full speed (as rod comes by 12:00), stop, repeat. Hold off the haul until your rod is hitting full speed (basically, as rod is coming past your ear).
                Starting the stroke and haul at full speed as the entire line load has straightened will overload the rod and steal power (especially with heavy lines).
                These brook trout will strike any fly you present, provided you don't get close enough to present it.
                -- Dick Blalock

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                • #9
                  One thing I see a lot, and which I'm guilty of from time to time myself, is taking the haul lazily off plane and to the side. This introduces a lot of 'noise' into the cast and kills line speed and messes with your line control. You gotta keep your hauls going directly along the same plane as the casting stroke.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Dylar View Post
                    One thing I see a lot, and which I'm guilty of from time to time myself, is taking the haul lazily off plane and to the side. This introduces a lot of 'noise' into the cast and kills line speed and messes with your line control. You gotta keep your hauls going directly along the same plane as the casting stroke.
                    That's a great tip, thanks!

                    FM
                    The tug is the drug!

                    "Grow a pear!" - Groundpounder

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Dylar View Post
                      One thing I see a lot, and which I'm guilty of from time to time myself, is taking the haul lazily off plane and to the side. This introduces a lot of 'noise' into the cast and kills line speed and messes with your line control. You gotta keep your hauls going directly along the same plane as the casting stroke.
                      This is something thats become a bad habit. Thought I could operate on multi-dimensional planes but not very efficient.
                      We are the music-makers,
                      And we are the dreamers of dreams,
                      Wandering by lone sea-breakers
                      And sitting by desolate streams;
                      World losers and world forsakers,
                      On whom the pale moon gleams.

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                      • #12
                        First, if you have trouble with loop control at any time, go back to the ground and do your double haul off the ground. You can follow a tape measure or rope and let it fall on the forward and back cast. You're trying to get it to fall as straight as possible along the line. Also, if you have trouble shooting in the first place I'd start with only shooting it on the forward cast. It can be too much to concentrate on at one time....the loop control, the haul timing, and the shooting. Start by getting the loop control down without hauling, then only hauling, then shooting only on the forward, and then shooting the forward and back cast. On the last forward and back cast series it help to shoot none at all and then shoot the delivery.....stole that part from Paul Arden.

                        -Greg

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