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Point Fly (Tight Line)

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  • Point Fly (Tight Line)

    Where do you like to position your point fly or anchor? Most of the books and information I've read position the point fly at bottom and have a tag or dropper about 2 ft. above. Just so happens these authors mostly fish more open waters and slower to moderate flow creeks/rivers. The places I like to fish have very fast flows most of the time. I'm new to tight lining and i'm trying different things. What is your philosophy behind fly positioning, adding weight vs. changing flies, and just rigging whats on the end of your line to fish the waters here in ga? And when do you feel like its appropriate to fish just one fly vs multiple?

  • #2
    I am a fan of Kelly Galloup's drop shot nymphing rig. Not to be confused with a Euro nymph system which doesn't add any weight to the leader other than the flies. I'll fish smaller lightly weighted flies (small beadheads) in slower water sometimes with no added weight on the leader. As the flow become faster and deeper I'll may fish larger flies weighted with beadheads and lead wire. In addition split shot may be added to the bottom of the rig for added weight. This setup adds weight below the point fly. It helps to keep the flies in line which helps to keep them from tangling, and the weight added at the bottom may pop off when it gets hung saving re-rigging. Just remember to connect the split shot with smaller tippet than the flies. I've seen many times the only thing I lost in the system when it got hung was the split shot. I may fish dry flies alone, but never just one nymph.
    Almost forgot, I might throw a small tippet ring into that mix now days.




    Image result for kelly galloup drop shot nymphing
    Last edited by Flyman NC; 03-04-19, 09:57 PM.
    "The secret of my influence has always been that it remained secret" -Salvador Dali

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    • #3
      I am not sure which books you are referring to, but I can assure you euro nymphing is more suited to the fast water in many ways and the authors fish the technique in swift waters. I almost always position it on the bottom. If your lighter fly is on the bottom you often have slack between the flies. This slack can start from the point of entry into the water. Since the lighter fly is more easily and quickly affected by current it can shoot ahead/downstream of the heavier fly which leads to poor strike detection. This would be magnified in fast water. Whenever someone tells me they catch most of their fish on the swing a red flag goes up in my mind and I picture this scenario. The swing would be the only time there is a direct connection to the bottom fly.
      http://www.bigtflyfishing.com

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      • #4
        ^ What Big T said!

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        • #5
          Iím with Flyman NC. Dropshot nymphing has been pretty productive for me with the high flows this winter. For the bottom fly Iíve been tying small nymphs with a long tag for the dropshot and Iíll usually have a bugger or an emerger tied off a dropper a little ways up.

          Im curious how some folks are getting flies down in the fast, deeper runs with Euro rigs. I usually tie a lot of lead into my nymphs but itís taking 3-5 pieces of BB shot just to bounce bottom in some of the 4-5ft runs Iíve fished.

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          • #6
            A lot of it has to do with the cast. I tend to lob the flies more so that the flies enter the water at a steep angle and I let them pendulum down versus laying line on the water which creates drag and slows down the descent. We also utilize something called a tuck cast. and as a general rule can get away with lighter tippet based on our rod design.
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            • #7
              Iíve seen it successfully fished both ways but I tend to keep the anchor on bottom. Arguments for the anchor up top are your lighter fly is forced down lower in the column. I feel I can compensate though with the angle of my leader. The only downside of this is more tippet in the water means less of a connection but the point fly on top also creates less connection to your smaller fly. Itís a toss up and everyone finds their own style that works best for them.
              The single fly rig is something Iím trying to utilize more lately. There are water types like fast pocket water with fairly technical currents that warrant a direct connection to a single fly. The lighter fly will cause a disconnect and potentially catch totally different currents causing an unnatural drift.
              Another benefit to the single fly rig is much less chance to fail when youíve removed the dropper connection. And after all presentation tends to trump fly selection(to an extent), so focusing on one single fly leads to a better drift and a stronger and more direct connection.
              Fly tying instagram @erikclymore

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              • #8
                Euro nymphing is a whole different animal for me. Agree with Big T, tuck cast helps. Slim profile flies and lighter leaders will also help the rig sink faster. Tungsten beads also help as do lead tapes and wires. I see now where they are even selling tungsten power to mix in with you UV cure products. Along with all the special materials and UV products they use it can get a little pricey.
                Last edited by Flyman NC; 03-04-19, 10:04 PM. Reason: 42
                "The secret of my influence has always been that it remained secret" -Salvador Dali

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                • #9
                  Tuck cast.
                  Thin flies with heavy heads (tungsten beads)
                  thin tippet
                  one fly or possibly two
                  post-cast line management

                  I don't euro: I tend to dry drop almost exclusively.
                  I just give my flies time to sink prior to drifting.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by splatek16 View Post
                    Tuck cast.
                    Thin flies with heavy heads (tungsten beads)
                    thin tippet
                    one fly or possibly two
                    post-cast line management

                    I don't euro: I tend to dry drop almost exclusively.
                    I just give my flies time to sink prior to drifting.
                    You used to be all euro!
                    http://www.bigtflyfishing.com

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                    • #11
                      Im also new to euro but ive been pretty successful fairly quickly. In Lance Egan and Devin Olsen's film "Modern Nymphing", they discuss sighter angle during the drift for differing types of water, and paying attention to that has helped me land more fish. I've probably watched it 10 or more times and pick up something new each watch. It's worth the purchase.

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