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How often do you "Change it up"?

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  • How often do you "Change it up"?

    Curious to hear how often y'all change things up when wading. When what you are throwing isn't working do you change flies or location more often. I'm fairly new to this and notoriously lazy so once I'm rigged up and on a spot I usually stay there a while and don't switch flies until I have to. When I get hung up and break off or all knotted and tangled then I'll tie something else on and wear that spot out again. Then I will move on. I catch a few fish but not a lot so I wonder if and what I should be changing up and how quickly. Thanks for your input.

  • #2
    I'll move around quite a bit, but almost never change flies


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    • #3
      I have had times when I have caught a couple of fish from a run,and they turn off. Change flies, color, size, and catch 2 or 3 more. Shut down, change flies, catch a few more. Other days I'll give a fly 5-10 casts in a run where I'm confident there are fish. If I don't catch something or get a hit in 10 casts or so, I'll change size, color, but stick with a pattern I have confidence in.

      And there have been a very few days that I've changed to find something the fish wouldn't hit. It happens.
      BE DIFFERENT AND MAKE A DIFFERENCE! <

      Exodus 29:18
      Then burn the entire ram on the altar. It is a burnt offering to the LORD, a pleasing aroma, a food offering presented to the LORD. God loves BBQ!

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      • #4
        When I first was learning to fly fish I was told if nothing has tried to take your fly and your drifts were good for 15 minutes try a new fly. That has proven to be some very valuable advice. The second best advice I received is go small, GO small, and GO SMALL. This advice I have struggled with the over the years when by myself. I have two experiences that have changed me over the last 12 months.

        Last year on Henry's Fork "Ranch" area the place was covered up with fisherman. I noticed only one person of out the 20 or so I could see had caught a fish in the 30-35 minutes it was taking the guide to get the boat in the water and park the truck. I'm thinking this is gonna be a looong day. We get in the boat and he paddles upstream about 15 minutes, anchors the boat, pulls out a small net and dips in the water. He rigs up my line with 6x fluorocarbon and what looks like a black rice grain on a hook. We proceeded to catch fish, 20"+ brown trout, most of the day.

        Second experience this past Friday, I was on private water with a great guide. We tried for two hours to catch a fish with a wide assortment of flies. The water was fairly stained, he claimed I was casting well and getting good drifts. We switched over to a size 20 pale bead headed nymph. Slayed them for the next 2 1/2 hours. Turned into an epic day of fishing.

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        • #5
          "GO small, GO SMALL" I learned a long time ago, 90% of a trout's diet is brown and 1/8inch long, the rest is dessert.
          BE DIFFERENT AND MAKE A DIFFERENCE! <

          Exodus 29:18
          Then burn the entire ram on the altar. It is a burnt offering to the LORD, a pleasing aroma, a food offering presented to the LORD. God loves BBQ!

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          • #6
            Originally posted by fishnpreacher View Post
            "GO small, GO SMALL" I learned a long time ago, 90% of a trout's diet is brown and 1/8inch long, the rest is dessert.
            This is priceless and something even I should be able to remember. Thanks!

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            • #7
              As often as necessary. I've been on trips when I landed 10 - 15 fish on the same rig standing in the same spot. Other times more like fishnpreacher catching one then nothing, change, catch another 1 or 2 then nothing and keep changing. Actually gone back to the original rig before and caught a fish after not catching anything with it the first time. I'm also one of those guilty of having too many rods. I always take all of my rods with me on a trip. And take 3 down to the river with me always. I'll have a different tandem set on each one so I don't have to stop, cut, and tie. I just walk back to the bank and swap rods. And to make life easier when I do have to stop and tie, I always tie up around a dozen tandem rigs at home and put them in those little round plastic containers. I just cut the original rig off and tie the new whole rig on. Stick the old rig in the container and put it in my "used stuff" pocket in my vest.
              "If God had intended for man to only fish on weekends, He would not have created the other five days of the week."

              Remember, always fight like you're the third monkey trying to get on Noah's ark.

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              • #8
                I tie up a bunch of tandem rigs before heading to the water myself. Saves time and my blood pressure.One "trick" I came up with. The first time I did this I needed some way to wrap the rigs up and keep them from getting all tangled up. I looked around the basement and found a couple of them cheap 4 inch foam paint brushes with the wooden dowel handles. I can wrap 5 or 6 rigs around the foam and keep them separated. Drop a couple of the loaded brushes in a zip lock sandwich bag and stuff it in by little pack.

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                • #9
                  I like it. Going to give it a try. It's a lesson in patience... When I'm tying droppers on the river. .

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                  • #10
                    http://www.ngatu692.com/Hatch_Chart/All_Year.htm

                    ...match the hatch...it's what's for dinner...change retrieve...move around...

                    Blessings!

                    Jimmy

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