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Article about C&R practices hurting the fish's ability to eat

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  • Article about C&R practices hurting the fish's ability to eat

    Interesting article citing a study coming out of my undergraduate Alma Mater.

    https://www.independent.co.uk/enviro...-a8575816.html

    I think it's an interesting idea but am curious about the size of the fish in the experiment and the size of the hook that pierced their mouths. There may also be other confounding variables such as how the hooks were removed from the fish, if the fish were netted instead of lifted out of the water by the hook, how long the fish were out of the water while unhooking.... etc

    I don't think it's a surprise that a recently hooked fish may eat less efficiently compared to a non-hooked fish but I dont know if a properly c&r fish will permanently have problems eating due to "lack of suction."

    Hope this sparks a good discussion.
    Hi my name is Charles and I'm a fishaholic.

    Some days I'm the hook and some days I'm the fish.

    Instagram @charles_the_toothsmith

  • #2
    I'll agree that there is a mortality rate to catch and release, and putting a big enough hole in the mouth of a fish that feeds by suction will cause a reduced ability to feed until the hole heals.
    My philosophy is to treat them the with best care I reasonably can and hope for the best.
    THEY TRIED TO BURY US BUT THEY DID NOT KNOW WE WERE SEEDS

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    • #3
      I would posit that a C&R fish has an infinitely higher chance of survival than a non-C&R fish.
      -skunked

      Warning: all posts should be assumed to contain sarcasm and misinformation unless stated otherwise. The opinions shared are not necessarily those of the poster.

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      • #4
        4 out of 5 doctors agree that jamming a hook through your cheek or jaw will make it more difficult to consume food afterwards.

        Why would you even post something like this? Whether you choose to believe it or not, you are a willing participant in a blood sport for entertainment! If you are being honest with yourself, you really do not care what the hook does to the fish. If you did, you probably would not do it.

        PS: it is good to be at the top of the food chain.
        Message sent from your mom's bedroom during pillow talk

        Buck Henry
        Simple Goat Herder
        Former NGTO President
        Hall of Fame Member

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Buck Henry View Post
          4 out of 5 doctors agree that jamming a hook through your cheek or jaw will make it more difficult to consume food afterwards.

          Why would you even post something like this? Whether you choose to believe it or not, you are a willing participant in a blood sport for entertainment! If you are being honest with yourself, you really do not care what the hook does to the fish. If you did, you probably would not do it.

          PS: it is good to be at the top of the food chain.
          You know... you're right. haha I do want the fish that I release to survive but I don't care much if they're hurting. Sad but true.
          Hi my name is Charles and I'm a fishaholic.

          Some days I'm the hook and some days I'm the fish.

          Instagram @charles_the_toothsmith

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          • #6
            That report is so biased and would not hold up to scientific review. You think maybe the shock from taking a fish out of its natural environment, transporting it a thousand miles, placing it in an aquarium might also have an effect on the eating habit? How about running a MANOVA test to see if you have a basis to make such a claim.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by huntfish View Post
              That report is so biased and would not hold up to scientific review. You think maybe the shock from taking a fish out of its natural environment, transporting it a thousand miles, placing it in an aquarium might also have an effect on the eating habit? How about running a MANOVA test to see if you have a basis to make such a claim.


              It's also an independent.uk article about the report. How about a link to the journal publication?


              Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
              "I don't hate trout fishing, just the people who trout fish."
              -Our friend Nam, but secretly Ret

              "Stop Whining"

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              • #8
                Yeah. I agree with you all. When I posted I wasn't agreeing with the article. I just came across it and since it was related to what most of us to as a hobby so I decided to share. I wonder who funds these studies. PETA?
                Hi my name is Charles and I'm a fishaholic.

                Some days I'm the hook and some days I'm the fish.

                Instagram @charles_the_toothsmith

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                • #9
                  Article about C&R practices hurting the fish's ability to eat

                  Here you go.

                  http://jeb.biologists.org/content/221/19/jeb180935

                  ETA: I suspect the authors are more interested in the impact of hook fishing to both at-risk species or commercially viable species and not for any “moral” reasons. In both cases they might be trying to understand if C&R impacts reproduction through reduced food intake due to injury. But that’s just a guess.

                  Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
                  Last edited by Trout8myfly; 10-10-18, 09:31 AM.
                  "What's his offense?"
                  "Groping for trouts in a peculiar river."
                  ― William Shakespeare, Measure for Measure

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                  • #10
                    It would be interesting to tag and study trout on a c&r stream like Dukes Creek and see if there is any validity to this

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                    • #11
                      Performance of injured fish < performance of uninjured fish...duh. Thanks for that, PhD’s!

                      So to break it down, if the enjoyment you get from fishing has enough of a positive impact on your life to justify the slight negative impact incurred by the fish you caught/released...then keep fishing! If not, find another hobby! 🍻


                      Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by trout1980 View Post
                        It would be interesting to tag and study trout on a c&r stream like Dukes Creek and see if there is any validity to this
                        I personally have caught the same fish twice within a 30 minute span at Dukes. How do I know this with 100% accuracy? The fly that broke off the first time was still in its mouth. For that one fish a hook in its mouth didn’t hinder it to continue to eat. Now this was a size 16 or 14 fly and wasn’t a 3/0 hook so the hole was minimal in comparison.
                        I am officially upgrading Gatorbyte from "fly in my ointment" to "thorn in my side". If he happens to elevate himself to "pain in my a$$" I'm gonna blame it on RScott.

                        Want to Help Ease DNR's Budget Woes? Buy a TU license Plate!


                        sigpic

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                        • #13
                          I’m willing to bet the vast majority of trout are just fine but still would be interesting nonetheless to confirm.

                          Trout would not be getting big at Dukes and others if hooking was hurting their feeding

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by baldea View Post
                            ...Now this was a size 16 or 14 fly and wasn’t a 3/0 hook so the hole was minimal in comparison.
                            Right, the study looked at bigger hooks that actually puncture the mouth and leave a hole. The hypothesis they wanted to test was whether a hole in the fish's mouth affected eating, and how much.
                            "What's his offense?"
                            "Groping for trouts in a peculiar river."
                            ― William Shakespeare, Measure for Measure

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                            • #15
                              Guess I'll just have to keep them all from now on.
                              Speck

                              Follower of Christ
                              Pursuer of trout
                              -------------------------------------------------
                              "Your genuine action will explain itself and will explain your other genuine actions. Your conformity explains nothing." -- Emerson

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