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  • Fishing Survival Kit.

    Ok - Talked about this a while ago but it just became important on Monday.

    Was in North Carolina on vacation and took a day to fish the Davidson. Drove up to Horse cove area, parked and walked down to the river which at that point is maybe 500 yards off the road.

    Mind you this is not an excuse, but the time changed the day before and it now gets dark earlier. So i fish (caught one brown) upstream all the way to where I could see the hatchery bridge and then started back down. (probably 1/2 to 3/4 miles from the car now.) It starts getting dark. Then clouds roll in and it instantly get pitch black dark. I don't want to cross the river in the dark so I stay on the road side. I reach a point where I cannot continue along the river and so I decide to bushwack from there up to the road. Thank you Lord for the flashlight. An hour later I am still bushwacking through and around mountain laurel, sometimes crawling, often backtracking.
    Finally while looking up in the trees trying to see the largest ones thinking the undergrowth would be less, I see a two wire power line ahead. I make it to the the power line and then follow that out to the road still a 1/4 mile from the car. One and 1/2 hours in complete dark. No phone service.

    Mistakes - not watching the clock to start with, not just walking to the hatchery road and down to the car, taking a short cut in the dark.

    It wasn't like I was going to have to spend the night in the woods, but what about if I added an injury to the mix? Definitely could have been likely. Waders may need some repair, I was really sore and really dirty in the end. Lost one piece of equipment but didn't break my rod even though I considered ditching it at one point. Wife was not happy - says I am grounded. Be careful out there...and be prepared.

    Here is my Survival Kit I carry in my fishing vest all the time. I never take it out so it is always there. Only 10 ounces.





    Here is what it is. an LED small flashlight. A plastic orange/chrome emergency blanket(warmth/shelter and bright so you can be found) a mini bic (fire). Several bandaids - one large and a couple of butterfly type. Antiseptic wipe, Triple antibiotic ointment, Alcohol prep pad, a chapsick rolled up in a few feet of duct tape (i prefer gorilla tape - this is good for bandages, repairs, splints etc) A few feet of paracord (tons of uses) a whistle (signalling) a piece of ferro rod (backup fire)
    Several rubber bands (tons of uses). A drinking straw filled with vasoline and cotton balls (fire starter). Drinking straw filled with iodine water purification tablets.

  • #2
    It will happen to us all eventually! Great thread Scott and one that will hopefully get folks to think about basic preparedness.
    Message sent from your mom's bedroom during pillow talk

    Buck Henry
    Simple Goat Herder
    Former NGTO President
    Hall of Fame Member

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    • #3
      Glad it worked out (relatively) well, good reminder and sounds like a good kit. Throw in a few Tylenol or Ibuprofen for fever, maybe a couple Benadryl for mild reaction to something and you’re good to go.

      Also, although I rarely do, another good tip is to let someone know where you’ll be and a general expectation of return time.

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      • #4
        Always Always ALWAYS!

        Always tell someone where you are going, and when you expect to be back. One of our TU members got smacked a few years ago on the North Mills by a 40' oak limb near dusk and would have died had he not told his wife the where and when. His wife called his brother and he instructed her to call mountain rescue and for them to call the brother so they could all meet up at the trail head.

        One other tid-bit I heard the other day, take that Bic lighter but leave it in the plastic wrapper for one more later of water proof.

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        • #5
          Yes, I always text my wife where I am going and when I will be back. Also a good point here is to leave your location specification where local LEO will know where it is to look.

          Also - meds! if you take any medication you must have daily add that to your kit.

          When it got dark I was mindful not to panic and keep in mind to be very calculated in your steps and movements. An ankle or knee twist would have been really bad.

          Of course - if I had been more calculating to begin with, I wouldn't have gotten in that situation. Honestly I let that "one more cast, one more hole, one more fish" attitude lure me into the darkness.

          Oh. One other thing - tell your wife that you do have a kit and if you had to stay the night in the woods, you are prepared. My wife had no idea - not sure she appreciated it much at the time.
          Last edited by ScottD; 11-09-18, 03:01 PM.

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          • #6
            ScottD - Good Advice

            And yes we all are guilty of "One Last Cast" syndrome. But as you did, don't panic. Stop, sit, remain quiet until heart beast and respiration return to normal then think through the situation and possible solutions. And that may be wait until dawn. Another good point you made is letting your significant other know that you have a survival package. I never thought about that but I will tell her this morning! Thanks.

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            • #7
              Good on you for keeping your cool.
              I remember last year sometime chasing specks I hiked in really, really far and ended up losing track of time. Had nothing but one 8oz water bottle, which was spent (no filter) and no food. I conveniently forgot the walk in was mostly down a steep ridge, meaning the hike out with no water for about 7 +/- hours was mostly uphill. I'm in reasonably good shape, but I remember at one point my legs shaking, slightly burning, and starting to get fuzzy. When I reached my truck, I had snacks and water in the truck (didn't want to carry them, because they'd weight me down). Ugh. Can be scary, but you have to keep your cool.

              Good work!
              I like that kit too. I am slowly redoing my kit with better stuff.

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              • #8
                Good post, thanks. I like your kit. Mine is similar but much I’m more robust for the fire starter. Maybe it was the Jack London books I read in my youth. Got a wind proof high dollar butane lighter, waterproof strike anywhere matches in stainless waterproof container, UST Sparkie Fire Starter, tinder and parrifin. Also carry a Spot. Being able to reach out when out of cell coverage is essential in my opinion. Always keep it in my pocket so we don’t get separated.

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                • #9
                  Spot?

                  Spot light? Our NC Mountain Rescue team told our TU meeting that the best way to be located is a high intensity flashlight aimed up into the trees. They said even in the rhodo thickets they can see that light for miles when searching at night.

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                  • #10
                    Been a while since I've seen this topic - I've surprise-spent the night out a few different times after getting caught between or on the wrong sides of rivers during massive rainstorms near dark in the Cohutta.

                    I blueline with a pack and it typically includes lighter + waterproof matches, knife, tactical tomahawk, emergency bivy sack, space blanket, tarp, cordage, poncho, lifestraw, sawyer mini filter, whistle, mirror, one head lamp, one small flashlight, cliff bars. Depending on temperature and conditions, I'll throw in a change of wicking clothes, wool socks, hat. Weighs 20-ish pounds? I've needed to use it twice and it didn't disappoint - which is what I remind myself every time I think it's overkill to take it.

                    I also leave plans, routes, etc with my wife or dad before I head out. It can be pretty hard to turn around even when you know you should. Glad you made it out and good on you to remind us all of the stakes out there.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by JOHNKIES View Post
                      Spot light? Our NC Mountain Rescue team told our TU meeting that the best way to be located is a high intensity flashlight aimed up into the trees. They said even in the rhodo thickets they can see that light for miles when searching at night.
                      Good to know about the spot light.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by JOHNKIES View Post
                        Spot light? Our NC Mountain Rescue team told our TU meeting that the best way to be located is a high intensity flashlight aimed up into the trees. They said even in the rhodo thickets they can see that light for miles when searching at night.
                        Yes! Surefire lights are awesome for lighting up the sky.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by mudrun View Post
                          Been a while since I've seen this topic - I've surprise-spent the night out a few different times after getting caught between or on the wrong sides of rivers during massive rainstorms near dark in the Cohutta.

                          I blueline with a pack and it typically includes lighter + waterproof matches, knife, tactical tomahawk, emergency bivy sack, space blanket, tarp, cordage, poncho, lifestraw, sawyer mini filter, whistle, mirror, one head lamp, one small flashlight, cliff bars. Depending on temperature and conditions, I'll throw in a change of wicking clothes, wool socks, hat. Weighs 20-ish pounds? I've needed to use it twice and it didn't disappoint - which is what I remind myself every time I think it's overkill to take it.

                          I also leave plans, routes, etc with my wife or dad before I head out. It can be pretty hard to turn around even when you know you should. Glad you made it out and good on you to remind us all of the stakes out there.
                          20 lbs!?!? I've got my kit in my sling pack. Could use some additions if I am being honest, but I've only needed it once. I alluded to it here, but I hurt my knee bad just before dark a couple of miles down a very steep trail from my car last spring. Took a while to make it back. The water filter has come in handy more than once.
                          -skunked

                          Warning: all posts should be assumed to contain sarcasm and misinformation unless stated otherwise. The opinions shared are not necessarily those of the poster.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by I_got_skunked View Post
                            20 lbs!?!?
                            Yep - good practice for loooong trail runs where you also have to navigate. Running pack is slightly heavier because although I don't bring bladed tools, I do bring calories. 20 lbs is not that big of a deal.

                            If I left knife and 'hawk at home and chose a lumbar pack or something, it would weigh next to nothing.

                            Knees are a sucky thing to hurt.

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