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  • #31
    If that was a Red Wolf it would be tagged with an electric transponder like they do with wolves in the west. If you read on Wikipedia you will get a better understanding of the red wolf in NC.

    That is a Coyote, they kill calves, dogs along with wildlife. They harbor other diseases that spread to humans and other animals. Kill'um they are vermin... The DNR does not have them protected for a reason.

    I had a flock of turkey's around my place, now I don't. My neighbor raises quail and such so you city slickers can come shoot them, some don't get shot, they don't last a day until the coyotes get them.

    I'll add this what if snake heads were discovered in the Hooch or Toccoa then what would you say?
    "I like beer, do you like beer, I like beer a lot."

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    • #32
      glad to see the guy (yote) got some others support. With regards to rabies, in Alabama the state drops vaccine from the air in tasty treat form for the coons and such, my Blue Heeler just loves to find those in the woods. I believe she was vaccinated about 4 times last year. Vet said she'd be fine
      " Is it ignorance or is it apathy?
      Hey man I don't know and I don't care" Jimmy Buffet

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      • #33
        Nobody is ever going to eradicate coyotes. We are their only predators. The species is pretty safe so killing one or two a year is not going to affect the overall population much.

        The thing with coyotes is that they are very elusive and very difficult to hunt. They get wise to any kind of calling or even baiting methods and once they are called once or twice, they won't fall for it again. The only way I really ever kill them is just happening to see them while deer hunting. They are extremely adaptable to all sorts of environments. I don't know anyone who kills "a lot" of coyotes every year here in Georgia.

        The good thing is that coyotes do not proliferate at an very fast rate. Their litters are fairly small, they can't reproduce until they are 2 years old typically, and, in a pack, only the alpha male gets to breed. The females only come into season once a year and only for about 10 days. So they are like the anti-feral hog.

        Even so, there are a lot of coyotes in Georgia now. They are in suburban and even urban settings. My old boss would routinely hear them yapping from his home in Brookwood Hills (between Midtown and Buckhead) near Peachtree Creek.

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        • #34
          Originally posted by Buck Henry View Post
          You will be hard pressed to convince me that we have a deer shortage here in Georgia due to Coyotes! How many deer can you kill on a tag in Georgia; 10 or has it gone up even higher since the last time I checked?

          PS: and they may not be an original native, but they are now!
          Originally posted by Mogogo View Post
          I'm with Buck, I don't get why the coyote should be eradicated out of wild areas. What would happen to our membership if we did away with every deer and turkey slayer?
          Too, rainbow and brown trout are not native. Should we do away with them as well?

          They said the same thing about introducing wolves out west. They've put a huge hurtin on elk, moose, sheep and livestock.

          I've also seen the same with wolves in Wisconsin on our property there.

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          • #35
            Originally posted by huntfish View Post
            They said the same thing about introducing wolves out west. They've put a huge hurtin on elk, moose, sheep and livestock.

            I've also seen the same with wolves in Wisconsin on our property there.
            Northwestern Montana has at least twice as many cougars as wolves and twice as many grizzly bears. Together they kill more adult deer and fawns than wolves do. Coyotes and black bears take a share as well. On top of that, the area has had two tough winters in a row. Deer totals dropped even where few predators prowl. Yet overall deer numbers remain within the historical average. For that matter, both elk and deer are doing well across the West. As game manager Jim Williams puts it, "With wolves back in the picture along with cougars and bears, we'll have places where elk and deer may never be as abundant again as people remember, and we'll have other places where they'll do fine. There are bigger drivers than wolves in these systems." Studies have shown that winter weather and the quality of wintering habitat are really what control deer and elk populations over time. That and human hunting. out of National Geographic, hmm
            " Is it ignorance or is it apathy?
            Hey man I don't know and I don't care" Jimmy Buffet

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            • #36
              Originally posted by wtbfishin View Post
              Northwestern Montana has at least twice as many cougars as wolves and twice as many grizzly bears. Together they kill more adult deer and fawns than wolves do. Coyotes and black bears take a share as well. On top of that, the area has had two tough winters in a row. Deer totals dropped even where few predators prowl. Yet overall deer numbers remain within the historical average. For that matter, both elk and deer are doing well across the West. As game manager Jim Williams puts it, "With wolves back in the picture along with cougars and bears, we'll have places where elk and deer may never be as abundant again as people remember, and we'll have other places where they'll do fine. There are bigger drivers than wolves in these systems." Studies have shown that winter weather and the quality of wintering habitat are really what control deer and elk populations over time. That and human hunting. out of National Geographic, hmm
              I would like to see you post this on westfly and then talk to the folks around the Big Hole. I think you will get a completely different story.
              "I like beer, do you like beer, I like beer a lot."

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              • #37
                there is always 2 sides or more and if I had sheep I'd probably on the other side of this one. You can copy and post if you like.
                " Is it ignorance or is it apathy?
                Hey man I don't know and I don't care" Jimmy Buffet

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                • #38
                  Originally posted by Buck Henry View Post
                  You will be hard pressed to convince me that we have a deer shortage here in Georgia due to Coyotes! How many deer can you kill on a tag in Georgia; 10 or has it gone up even higher since the last time I checked?

                  PS: and they may not be an original native, but they are now!
                  Clark, no one said we had a shortage of deer due to coyotes.

                  What we do have is a non-native species (the coyote) which is very adapt at taking fawns. Do some research on the internet and you'll find a study done in South Carolina documenting the impact of coyotes on fawns.

                  I personally observe a lot of wildlife from the tree stand. This past deer season (before it cut short for me) I saw only one doe with a fawn on my lease in Oglethorpe Co. With the one exception, all of the does I saw had no fawns where a healthy doe will normally have one or two fawns. We do, in fact, have a very large population of coyotes on the lease based upon sightings, sign, and vocalazation.

                  Btw, the deer herd in Georgia has declined from the time when the 12 deer limit (2 bucks and 10 dies) was implemented. There are a number of reasons for this.....fawn depredation from coyotes is only one of the reasons.

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                  • #39
                    Originally posted by Mogogo View Post
                    I'm with Buck, I don't get why the coyote should be eradicated out of wild areas. What would happen to our membership if we did away with every deer and turkey slayer?
                    Too, rainbow and brown trout are not native. Should we do away with them as well?
                    Mogogo, I assume your comment was directed to my post.

                    No where did I mention eradication. As a crafty, noctural animal I don't beleive it would be possible to eradicate coyotes.

                    I do believe, and am backed up through studies, the coyote has an adverse effect on our native game and birds.

                    I stand by my comment.....coyotes don't get a pass from me.

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                    • #40
                      GON article from 2006

                      http://www.gon.com/article.php?id=347

                      This is a good read from five years ago. You might pick up on a thing or two about yotes and deer.

                      Comment


                      • #41
                        Originally posted by wtbfishin View Post
                        Northwestern Montana has at least twice as many cougars as wolves and twice as many grizzly bears. Together they kill more adult deer and fawns than wolves do. Coyotes and black bears take a share as well. On top of that, the area has had two tough winters in a row. Deer totals dropped even where few predators prowl. Yet overall deer numbers remain within the historical average. For that matter, both elk and deer are doing well across the West. As game manager Jim Williams puts it, "With wolves back in the picture along with cougars and bears, we'll have places where elk and deer may never be as abundant again as people remember, and we'll have other places where they'll do fine. There are bigger drivers than wolves in these systems." Studies have shown that winter weather and the quality of wintering habitat are really what control deer and elk populations over time. That and human hunting. out of National Geographic, hmm
                        First off, wolves were not introduced in NW Montana so your logic is all wrong. The grizzly and cougars have always been there so yes overall deer number remain within the historical levels. Thats game management 101.

                        Now try looking down south toward Yellowstone were the wolves were introduced. There have been huge decrease in herds. Areas that were once general OTC tags are now limited quota with extremely low numbers. In fact, Montana andf Wyoming had a wolf hunt scheduled but no, the Federal courts stated that since Idaho has so limited wolves, they need to be re-established as ES.

                        Management of wildlife involves hunting as a tool, not preventing it. Without proper management; deer, turkey, pronghorns, wood ducks, heck all ducks, would be extremely limited in the US.

                        Ask the folks in CA about the cougar problems and attacks. Same goes with the black bear increase in the NE. Hunting is a management tool, simple as that.

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                        • #42


                          Y'all realize this was a thread about a pretty cool shot of a coyote.
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                          • #43
                            From the AJC this PM:



                            Hartsfield-Jackson flights briefly delayed by runway coyoteShareThisPrint E-mail .By Christian Boone


                            The Atlanta Journal-Constitution

                            A coyote on the runway briefly delayed flights out of Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport Tuesday afternoon, the FAA has confirmed.

                            More Atlanta area news »
                            Community Foundation gives $2 million in grants
                            Judge orders mediation in DeKalb schools suit
                            Personal care homes, child care institutions zoning meetings set
                            Summer camp registration Saturday
                            .The prairie wolf was spotted on the south side of the airport around 3:30 p.m., Federal Aviation Administration spokeswoman Kathleen Bergen said.

                            "An airport vehicle chased him into a ravine" and flights resumed after roughly five minutes, Bergen said.

                            Finding wildlife on runways is not as uncommon as you think.

                            "They've even had alligators turn up at some Florida airports," Bergen said.

                            And while it may be the first time a coyote has a delayed a flight out of Hartsfield-Jackson, it probably won't be the last.

                            Foreign to Georgia just a quarter-century ago, prairie wolves have been seen everywhere from the wetlands around Sope Creek in east Cobb to the heavily wooded neighborhoods in Buckhead. Earlier this month, Decatur residents appealed to city leaders for help in controlling the burgeoning coyote population.

                            Just last week a dead coyote was found not far off the Downtown Connector.

                            "There's not much you can do about them," said Brent Womack, a wildlife biologist with the Georgia Department of Natural Resources. "They're everywhere. Even New York City has coyotes. "

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                            • #44
                              Dang, that fern valley coyote sure gets around!
                              "What's his offense?"
                              "Groping for trouts in a peculiar river."
                              ― William Shakespeare, Measure for Measure

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                              • #45
                                Mr HF it does not seem wolfs were all bad for YS There are still close to 10,000 elk wintering in Yellowstone and perhaps double that number summering in the park. "But wolves are very selective hunters," Smith says. "What counts for them is the amount of vulnerable prey."

                                Much as experience with wolves can transform cattle into not-so-domestic animals, pack-hunted elk turn into less vulnerable quarry. They become more vigilant and keep on the move more. In the wolfless era, herds practically camped at favorite winter dining spots, foraging on young aspen, willow, and cottonwood until the stems grew clubbed and stunted like bonsai plants. Released from such grazing pressure, saplings now shoot up to form lush young groves. More songbirds find nesting habitat within their leafy shade. Along waterways, vigorous willow and cottonwood growth helps stabilize stream banks. More insects fall from overhanging stems to feed FISH!!! and amphibians. Beavers find enough nutritious twigs and branches to support new colonies.

                                Surveying the huge northern range, where most of the park's elk winter, Doug Smith turned up just one beaver colony in 1996(the year wolfs were re-introduced)—the lowest tally in decades. By 2009, he recorded 12. Along Crystal Creek I find another recent beaver dam storing water, releasing a more constant flow for riparian species downstream through the dry months. Ponds and marshes that form behind the dams create habitat for moose, muskrat, mink, waterfowl, wading birds, and an array of other wildlife. After wolves moved in, cougars that had begun hunting the valleys retreated to the steep, rocky terrain they normally inhabit. The big canines killed nearly half the coyote population. They may have rebounded a bit, but the coyotes now live in groups with shrunk territories or as vagabond "floaters." With less competition from elk for grasses, bison may be doing better than ever. hmmm

                                From a single new predatory force on the land*scape, a rebalancing effect ripples all the way to microbes in the soil. Biologists define the series of top-down changes as a trophic cascade. In a nod to the behavioral factors at play, others speak of the "ecology of fear. The YS wolf count is in decline at this point in time.
                                Either way I'm done w/this thread giviing you the last word if you like .

                                That is one of the prettiest Coyoties I've ever seen GB your right.
                                Oh and who is ND calling a city slicker cause it ain't me
                                " Is it ignorance or is it apathy?
                                Hey man I don't know and I don't care" Jimmy Buffet

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