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What rifle should I get

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  • #16
    I agree with Huntfish and would only add 'bullet construction' to his point on shot placement.

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    • #17
      ..........
      Last edited by _Cold_; 02-14-14, 05:09 PM.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by _Cold_ View Post
        While you can kill nearly any animal with any caliber (and perhaps at reasonable range), there is a reason why most people don't go deer hunting with a .22, and why elk hunters typically use a heavier caliber rifle such as a .300 Win.

        "Possible" and "ideal" are two different things.

        Just sayin'
        First off, .22 rimfire are illegal in most states for large game so that's not possible. The use of heavier caliber (you state .300 Win Mag but not my definition) for elk is just hype. They try to overcompensate their lack of markmanship and experience with a larger caliber.

        Read some Jack O'Connor (270) for all North Amercian Animals and WDM Bell (6mm [243] & 7X57 [270]) on elephants.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by huntfish View Post
          Reaching out and "touch" something has no bearing on the calibre, it's the shooter and his/her ability. One should definitely be aware of their capabilities with the rifle and try not to extend beyond that distance.
          Let me start by sayin that I do not hunt! Nor do I think I'm a know it all like some of the people on the forum! I guess what I was trying to say is that a 300 win mag is a tack driver and a very flat shooting rifle. It has the capability of taking game at very long distances. I like it because it can take any animal in NA!

          And yes, the shooter should only hunt within his limits. Some guys are just that good and it doesn't matter what they carry, be it a 270, 308, 30-06, 7mm mag,300 win mag etc

          My old roommate and very close friend comes from a family of gunsmiths, so this is where I learned about guns. I wish I grew up hunting, my Dad wasn't into it.
          https://www.youtube.com/user/Georgia...?feature=watch

          My biggest worry is that when I'm dead my wife will sell my fishing gear for what I said I paid for it. ~Koos Brandt

          sigpic

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          • #20
            Tikka T3, 7mm Rem Mag, Savage

            I just bought a Tikka T3 in 308 that is made in Finland by Sako. Mine shoots almost same hole groups off bags on bench at 100 yds which for a $600 rifle is phenomenal. They make magnum calibers, but as others above have said is too much for around here. Magnum calibers in this light of a rifle will knock your shoulder/fillings out if not shouldered properly. BPS link below.

            http://www.basspro.com/Tikka-T3-Hunt...18048/-1109012

            The Tikka replaced a Benelli R1 300 Win Mag. The former owner who was getting up in years sold it becasue it kicked too hard. I sold it without ever firing it because I don't plan on elk hunting and if you're shooting a magnum for its range capabilities then using a semi-auto with recoil dampening to do it is counterproductive. Plus ammo is more expensive.

            I have known elk hunters that really like the 7mm Rem Mag.

            I also heard Savage is making some pretty good rifles for under $400.

            If I bought another gun it would be Buck Henry's 243 for 1/2 of what he thinks its worth.

            Thats my $.02.

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            • #21
              As for the original question. I shoot Winchesters, Brownings, Rugers and Remington in various calibers ranging from 22.250 through 375 H&H. Although, my go to gun, when traveling is an old Ruger M77 in 30.06. Why? I've shot that gun for over thirty years and it's almost an extension of my arm. I know how it will shoot and up to what range I'm comfortable with it (600 yards) on a solid rest.

              I agree with bullet composition also. Yes, plain old CoreLokt's will work great for Whitetail and I use them; but when I step up to larger game (mule deer or larger) or expected long range shooting (pronghorns), I change ammo. I also practice and sight int with that ammo and create my own ballistic chart rather than look on the box. It makes a huge difference. For example, 150 grain Remington Corelokt zeroed at 100 yards. Replacing with 150 grain Remington Ballistic Tip results in a 5 inch rise. Replacing with 150 grain Sirroco's results in a 8 inch rise. Changing to a Winchester 180 grain Accubond results in a 2 inch drop.

              Another thing to consider is ammo availability in the area you are planning on hunting. Yes... bags get lost in transit, people forget ammo etc. Most remote locations won't have that 300 RSM or 338 readily available for sale. More than likely, neither will anybody else in camp.

              ALWAYS, ALWAYS, when traveling, check your scope by sending a few down range prior to hunting. A lot of guides (especially elk) get lazy and expect their clients to be able to shoot 300 yards which is not often the case. Be extremely honest with your guide about your shooting prowess and you both will have a better trip.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by Big Browns View Post
                Let me start by sayin that I do not hunt! Nor do I think I'm a know it all like some of the people on the forum! I guess what I was trying to say is that a 300 win mag is a tack driver and a very flat shooting rifle. It has the capability of taking game at very long distances. I like it because it can take any animal in NA!

                And yes, the shooter should only hunt within his limits. Some guys are just that good and it doesn't matter what they carry, be it a 270, 308, 30-06, 7mm mag,300 win mag etc

                My old roommate and very close friend comes from a family of gunsmiths, so this is where I learned about guns. I wish I grew up hunting, my Dad wasn't into it.
                I wasn't saying anything about your choice of the 300 Win Mag. I own and shoot one also and yes, i can drive tacks. What I was refering to was not to overcompensate thinking that a larger caliber was better rather than shooting skills. Trust me, it doesn't matter if you hit the elk with a 300 Win Mag, 456 Win Mag or 243 Win. If you don't place the shot correctly, you will have a long day. As for flat shooting, not really that much difference between a 30.06 and 300 Win Mag, ~ 1.5 inches differences at 300 yards. You can flatten that out if you reload.

                http://forum.gon.com/showthread.php?t=100134


                Another thing to consider is recoil. A 300 Win Mag will give you about 5 more pounds of recoil vs. 30.06
                Last edited by huntfish; 02-23-11, 12:50 PM.

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                • #23
                  ..........
                  Last edited by _Cold_; 02-14-14, 05:08 PM.

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                  • #24
                    An M77 in 30-06 is my go to as well but, since the thread started off with price sensitivity, I looked a litter lower on the $ scale. I opted for a Savage in 338 Win Mag because I doubted that I'd use it enough to 'rationalize' spending more for this caliber. I had plans to replace the Accutrigger because I'm not generally fond of gizmos. One trip to the range proved otherwise. ...and of course, with all due respect to you Glock fans.

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by _Cold_ View Post
                      .222 then

                      Either way, while I'm not saying you're wrong, I'm most definitely saying that there are reasons why certain calibers tend to be used and not used for certain applications.
                      It's more for convience and comfort. If someone wants to learn good shooting skills and shoot alot, go with a 22 LR where ammo is relatively cheap. Shooting prairie dogs with a High Power rifle would be expensive and hard on the shoulder after a 100 rounds, hence the 17, 22, 222 which is almost recoiless.

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                      • #26
                        Like reels, rods, lines, flies..........Arguing what rifle, caliber, scope is best is the same thing.

                        Ulimate objective is to cleanly harvest your animal.

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                        • #27
                          Which is our segue into the topics of cartridge efficiency and over-bore. Bring on the 338-06 and the 35 Whelan with a 1:12 twist!

                          The cooking part is imprtant too. ...and now, with all due respect to you catch-&-releasers.

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by huntfish View Post
                            Like reels, rods, lines, flies..........Arguing what rifle, caliber, scope is best is the same thing.

                            Ulimate objective is to cleanly harvest your animal.
                            Agreed! You know what they say about opinions....

                            Before I would buy a rifle for targeting elk, I would want to know what distance I'd be shooting from on average. I'm guessing that a majority of elk are taken in the 150-300 yd range.... If that is true, I'd guess I'd go with the ole tried and true 06.... Or maybe I'd try to get a little closer and go cowboy style with an old lever action 44 or maybe the classic 30-30

                            Like I said, I don't hunt, so what do I know...

                            I have done a lot of shooting with my old 10-22, which I love BTW, and i can say it would be the first gun I'd grab in a WSHTF situation. Anything within 100yds is DRT!!! Iron sights of course.
                            https://www.youtube.com/user/Georgia...?feature=watch

                            My biggest worry is that when I'm dead my wife will sell my fishing gear for what I said I paid for it. ~Koos Brandt

                            sigpic

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by huntfish View Post
                              Reaching out and "touch" something has no bearing on the calibre, it's the shooter and his/her ability. One should definitely be aware of their capabilities with the rifle and try not to extend beyond that distance.
                              Yep I can shoot a deer at a hundred yards with snub nose 38 and shoot a deer at a hundred yards with a hickory bow don't you know.
                              DILLIGAF

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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by tommyking View Post
                                Yep I can shoot a deer at a hundred yards with snub nose 38 and shoot a deer at a hundred yards with a hickory bow don't you know.
                                as long as your shot placement is on point!
                                https://www.youtube.com/user/Georgia...?feature=watch

                                My biggest worry is that when I'm dead my wife will sell my fishing gear for what I said I paid for it. ~Koos Brandt

                                sigpic

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