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Six-week dry aged USDA Prime whole ribeye

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  • #16
    Originally posted by Trouter23 View Post
    The outer 1/2-inch or so will get trimmed off before cooking. It'll be way too dry to sear and eat.

    As far as the trimmings go, I'll usually cut them down and make a stew with them. The liquid from the stew rehydrates the trimmings.

    Interestingly, something that I used to believe was true but learned otherwise, the improvement in flavor that comes from dry aging is not owing to a concentration of flavors due to the evaporation of water. The dried part gets cut off. And, as the muscle fibers on the outside dry, they also tighten, thus preventing further evaporation from deeper inside the cut. So, the effects of evaporation are in the trimmings, not really in the final product.

    But, the neat thing is, as time goes on, this dried outer layer increasingly guards against rotting because, if there will be any bad bacteria that could threaten the project, it will be on the outside of the meat, not on the inside. Yet, as the outside dries, it becomes increasingly inhospitable to bacteria. So, even though it seems that the chance of rotting goes up as the dry aging process continues, it actually goes down (if it's been prepared and executed properly, i.e. cleanly).

    The improved flavor and tenderization comes primarily from enzymatic and bacterial action as well as the oxidation of fat.


    So the bacteria moves outwards because it's easier? As the meat dries?

    Vs

    A dead animal with skin on in the woods the bacteria moves to the meat because the skin has trapped it?

    I don't understand this process at all. I don't doubt it, it's clearly the most praised way of aging meat, I just don't get the science behind it. I don't have a science background but got a good break down of the science of smoking pork/beef. I'd be interested in the same thing for dry aging. If you've got a link handy. But I'd have no qualms of eating that chunk of meat. Keep the porn coming.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    "I don't hate trout fishing, just the people who trout fish."
    -Our friend Nam, but secretly Ret

    "Stop Whining"

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    • #17
      Sorry, didn't read your whole response, things break down internally and you hope to control it to a degree as I read it?


      Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
      "I don't hate trout fishing, just the people who trout fish."
      -Our friend Nam, but secretly Ret

      "Stop Whining"

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      • #18
        ...is this how Sparks and Spago do it...?

        Blessings!

        Jimmy

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        • #19
          Originally posted by troutbum69 View Post
          I don't understand this process at all. I don't doubt it, it's clearly the most praised way of aging meat, I just don't get the science behind it.
          It's like beer and blue cheese, the little beasties sometimes do some wonderfull things.

          https://goo.gl/images/1xqorY
          If this were rocket science most of us wouldn't be doing it. - Terry Creech

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          • #20
            Looks awesome man I can't wait to see the final product.

            I've never dry aged anything but wet aged (vacuum sealed) venison tenderloin for 6 or 8 months once and it was amazing. I may actually try this on some ribeye though. There are a few Brazilian butcher shops near my house that sell it around $6/lb whole or sliced as thick as you want.

            @troutbum69 To the bacteria, I always thought with beef/venison it was only airborne that you had to watch out for. That's why you can just sear a steak and be safe, but with burger where you are taking air exposed pieces and mixing it into the grind mix, it has to be cooked longer.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by troutbum69 View Post
              So the bacteria moves outwards because it's easier? As the meat dries?

              Vs

              A dead animal with skin on in the woods the bacteria moves to the meat because the skin has trapped it?

              I don't understand this process at all. I don't doubt it, it's clearly the most praised way of aging meat, I just don't get the science behind it. I don't have a science background but got a good break down of the science of smoking pork/beef. I'd be interested in the same thing for dry aging. If you've got a link handy. But I'd have no qualms of eating that chunk of meat. Keep the porn coming.


              Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
              In his book, On Food and Cooking, Harold McGee (the dude Alton Brown learns from) says this:

              "The intact muscles of healthy livestock are generally free of microbes. The bacteria and molds that spoil meat are introduced during the processing, usually from the animal's hide or the packing-plant machinery."

              In other words, bacteria will, generally, only be on the outside of the cut of meat, unless it's been introduced to the inside by piercing or some other means.
              Last edited by Trouter23; 12-05-17, 07:56 PM.
              I'm so old I remember when men wore tattoos and women wore earrings.
              -Lefty Kreh

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              • #22
                Very interesting. I look forward to progress and completion!


                Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
                "I don't hate trout fishing, just the people who trout fish."
                -Our friend Nam, but secretly Ret

                "Stop Whining"

                Comment


                • #23
                  On Food and Cooking, Harold McGee
                  I've had this book for years and have never once cracked it. I need to remedy that.

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                  • #24
                    I visited the new LIDL grocery here in Charleston S.C. today.( Impressed )
                    They had dry aged Black Angus with # of days aged on label. Multiple cuts all aged around 21-24 days from the selection I saw.
                    Under 10$ #.Bought a decent sized Sirloin for $6.64 aged 23 days I will report back!
                    Catch the energy
                    Release the potential

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                    • #25
                      Very cool that you got to go to a Lidl. After hearing Clark talk about them for years, and now that they're finally here, I'd love to visit one too, but I haven't been close enough to any yet.

                      Was the dry aged beef wrapped in plastic on Styrofoam or was it cryovaced?
                      I'm so old I remember when men wore tattoos and women wore earrings.
                      -Lefty Kreh

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                      • #26
                        It was cryovaced
                        Catch the energy
                        Release the potential

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                        • #27
                          Day 29:

                          I'm so old I remember when men wore tattoos and women wore earrings.
                          -Lefty Kreh

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                          • #28
                            I am drooling when I look at your pictures. I love dry-aged beef.


                            "Not every Soldier is a Joe"

                            You can support the NGTO Mission Statement and Help Ease DNR's Budget Woes. Buy a TU License Plate!

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                            • #29
                              Check out Umai Dry aging bags.
                              Catch the energy
                              Release the potential

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                              • #30
                                We are the music-makers,
                                And we are the dreamers of dreams,
                                Wandering by lone sea-breakers
                                And sitting by desolate streams;
                                World losers and world forsakers,
                                On whom the pale moon gleams.

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