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Six-week dry aged USDA Prime whole ribeye

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  • Six-week dry aged USDA Prime whole ribeye

    The goal: Serve the best steak on Christmas Day my family or I have ever had.

    The plan: Dry age a USDA Prime whole ribeye for 43 days, trim it, then sear it to medium-rare perfection.

    Some of you might recall that back at Christmas time in 2015 I dry aged a USDA Choice whole ribeye for four weeks. That steak was the best I'd ever had and I've had a lot, from Peter Luger to Chops, Bones, and Linger Longer. All serve excellent steaks, but I cannot lie. Even being USDA Choice (albeit, due to the marbling, it was on the higher end of Choice), it still beat any steak I've had out - including multiple trips to Peter Luger. The beefiness was something I had never tasted before and the tenderness was right there with Prime.

    Ever since, though, I wondered, what if we pushed the drying even further out and went with the pinnacle of beef that is USDA Prime? So, this past Sunday I went to Costco at Cumberland and, thankfully, my favorite butcher buddy was working. After surveying the cryovaced whole Prime ribeyes in search of the largest spinalis dorsi (aka the ribeye cap, aka the beefiest and most tender part of the cow), I asked him if he would check in the back for a whole ribeye with the biggest spinalis dorsi they had. He went in the back for a few minutes and then emerged with what I was after: a cryovaced whole USDA Prime ribeye with the biggest spinalis dorsi I had ever seen. On one end, it was almost half of the ribeye, no joke. I'll take it!

    $17.99 pounds at $10.89 per pound for a total of $195.91



    As soon as I got home, I took it out of the cooler, took it out of the cryovac, cut it in two, placed it on a cooling rack in a sheet pan, and parked it in the bottom of my refrigerator. I cut it in two because I'll be serving three ribeyes out of the smaller cut to my pastor and his wife around the four week mark. The other, larger ribeye will end up yielding about five ribeyes after being trimmed at the six week mark.



    Day 1: Will update this thread with a picture every Sunday leading up to Christmas Day.

    Last edited by Trouter23; 11-16-17, 12:43 AM.
    I'm so old I remember when men wore tattoos and women wore earrings.
    -Lefty Kreh

  • #2
    I did it once and man that's good stuff. I was told to wrap the beef in cheesecloth and change it every two weeks but that must not be necessary.

    I usually eat my meat right off the bone raw after a kill so it's hard for me to wait six weeks.
    http://www.bigtflyfishing.com

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    • #3
      Yes! I remember. Keep us posted I'll be following this.
      We are the music-makers,
      And we are the dreamers of dreams,
      Wandering by lone sea-breakers
      And sitting by desolate streams;
      World losers and world forsakers,
      On whom the pale moon gleams.

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      • #4
        Looking forward to the pics. I think we need smell-a-vision for the final product.

        My wife and kids will NOT eat the spinalis dorsi (glad to know the name as I always called it the good part) . They claim it is too fatty, but what they don't understand that this is tenderness and not fat. they can't get past the texture difference. Being the great father that I am, I relieve them of the burden by taking their portion in exchange for a different part of mine.

        Lately, I have been using the iron skillet with: butter, garlic, rosemary, and cognac for a sauce.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Uncle Fun View Post
          Being the great father that I am, I relieve them of the burden by taking their portion in exchange for a different part of mine.
          Ha - that's straight love right there.
          I'm so old I remember when men wore tattoos and women wore earrings.
          -Lefty Kreh

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Big T View Post
            I did it once and man that's good stuff. I was told to wrap the beef in cheesecloth and change it every two weeks but that must not be necessary.
            Yeah, I used to too. Turns out, as I learned, it's unnecessary. The beef dries out on its own without needing help. In fact, it might actually hurt. Anything that holds moisture against the meat is bad. And, changing that stuff out every week is just more work. All of which are probably the reasons why steakhouses don't do it. Imagine trying to keep up with that for thousands of whole cuts!

            Peter Luger's dry aging room:



            I'm so old I remember when men wore tattoos and women wore earrings.
            -Lefty Kreh

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            • #7
              Oh Yeah! Following this thread fosho!!!!
              " When you are retired, everyday is Saturday "
              David

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              • #8
                Day 8:

                I'm so old I remember when men wore tattoos and women wore earrings.
                -Lefty Kreh

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                • #9
                  That already looks righteous. I can feel the flavors concentrating.
                  http://www.bigtflyfishing.com

                  Use Promo Code NGTO for 5% off

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                  • #10
                    Day 15:

                    I'm so old I remember when men wore tattoos and women wore earrings.
                    -Lefty Kreh

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                    • #11
                      Remarkable!

                      Your patience in this is remarkable. If that was in my frig half of it would be gone by now due to regular taste testings! If you don't have quite that much time, there is an Alton Brown episode where he "dry ages beef" (demonstrated with ribeye) in a couple of days. Briefly, cut the steaks, put them on an open rack and into your freezer for 24 to 48 hours. No, not quite the same but gets you there sooner. I do this with pork chops which I cut from the whole loin when on sale at Sams. For the pork I do just the 24 hours

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                      • #12
                        Looks pretty ....

                        The finest steaks in the world are aged in NYC totally unlike the stuff we buy at the store......Many years ago I had meat cutter buddie quit his 30 years at the A&P to start his own shop.....He cut it all, but deer season made his year....Anywhere from 1000 to 1400 is what he did...He knew meat , would only eat deer that was aged a minimum of 28 days. mostly MUCH more....

                        This is beautiful....I want a bite.....

                        Please, please , please don't pull it before you're ready....

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                        • #13
                          Day 22:

                          I'm so old I remember when men wore tattoos and women wore earrings.
                          -Lefty Kreh

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                          • #14
                            So as I understand it a sort of rind actually forms on the meat? Is that to be taken away before cooking? After cooking? Or eaten? I'm jealous and am thinking I may try this soon


                            Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
                            "I don't hate trout fishing, just the people who trout fish."
                            -Our friend Nam, but secretly Ret

                            "Stop Whining"

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by troutbum69 View Post
                              So as I understand it a sort of rind actually forms on the meat? Is that to be taken away before cooking? After cooking? Or eaten? I'm jealous and am thinking I may try this soon


                              Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
                              The outer 1/2-inch or so will get trimmed off before cooking. It'll be way too dry to sear and eat.

                              As far as the trimmings go, I'll usually cut them down and make a stew with them. The liquid from the stew rehydrates the trimmings.

                              Interestingly, something that I used to believe was true but learned otherwise, the improvement in flavor that comes from dry aging is not owing to a concentration of flavors due to the evaporation of water. The dried part gets cut off. And, as the muscle fibers on the outside dry, they also tighten, thus preventing further evaporation from deeper inside the cut. So, the effects of evaporation are in the trimmings, not really in the final product.

                              But, the neat thing is, as time goes on, this dried outer layer increasingly guards against rotting because, if there will be any bad bacteria that could threaten the project, it will be on the outside of the meat, not on the inside. Yet, as the outside dries, it becomes increasingly inhospitable to bacteria. So, even though it seems that the chance of rotting goes up as the dry aging process continues, it actually goes down (if it's been prepared and executed properly, i.e. cleanly).

                              The improved flavor and tenderization comes primarily from enzymatic and bacterial action as well as the oxidation of fat.
                              Last edited by Trouter23; 12-04-17, 12:58 AM.
                              I'm so old I remember when men wore tattoos and women wore earrings.
                              -Lefty Kreh

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