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  • Just bumped up my contribution 2% more, to 17%.

    Stocks are on sale, and I want to get as many shares as I can while the price is lower.

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    • Originally posted by buckman1 View Post
      Just bumped up my contribution 2% more, to 17%.

      Stocks are on sale, and I want to get as many shares as I can while the price is lower.

      Message sent from your mom's bedroom during pillow talk

      Buck Henry
      Simple Goat Herder
      Former NGTO President
      Hall of Fame Member

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      • I wonder if the last two days are real gains or just a "dead cat bounce"?
        "What's his offense?"
        "Groping for trouts in a peculiar river."
        ― William Shakespeare, Measure for Measure

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        • My FA said that we were basically seeing future earnings being adjusted for inflation that everyone knows is coming. He said that overall the economy was in great shape and thus there was no reason to believe this was nothing more than inflation fears rearing it's ugly head.
          Message sent from your mom's bedroom during pillow talk

          Buck Henry
          Simple Goat Herder
          Former NGTO President
          Hall of Fame Member

          Comment


          • Originally posted by Buck Henry View Post
            My FA said that we were basically seeing future earnings being adjusted for inflation that everyone knows is coming. He said that overall the economy was in great shape and thus there was no reason to believe this was nothing more than inflation fears rearing it's ugly head.
            Quite right. And it's about time... I'm not saying that inflation is a good thing (remember the 80s?) but some inflation is normal.
            "What's his offense?"
            "Groping for trouts in a peculiar river."
            ― William Shakespeare, Measure for Measure

            Comment


            • Originally posted by Trout8myfly View Post
              Quite right. And it's about time... I'm not saying that inflation is a good thing (remember the 80s?) but some inflation is normal.
              Bought my first home in the 1980s at 13% interest on a FHA loan. Young folks today would have a heart-attack at that rate. But that was the way it was back then. The thing is you just cope with what the conditions are at the time and scale back your expectations if need be.
              Last edited by natureman; 02-07-18, 12:04 PM.

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              • Originally posted by natureman View Post
                Bought my first home in the 1980s at 13% interest. Young folks today would have a heart-attack at that rate. But that was the way it was back then. The thing is you just cope with what the conditions are at the time and scale back your expectations if need be.
                I remember it well...I married in 1980, so we bought a single wide and put on property I owned. About a year after we married, we checked into buying a house. Long story short, the best we could do was 15% for 30 years, on a $30,000 loan. Bottom line? $180,000 payback on a $30,000 loan. No Way
                BE DIFFERENT AND MAKE A DIFFERENCE! <

                Exodus 29:18
                Then burn the entire ram on the altar. It is a burnt offering to the LORD, a pleasing aroma, a food offering presented to the LORD. God loves BBQ!

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                • My first home load in 1986 was at 9.5%. But it was a great time if you wanted to earn a great return with almost zero risk. My mom locked her mother's railroad pension money into CD's earning 15% or more and made a killing.
                  Message sent from your mom's bedroom during pillow talk

                  Buck Henry
                  Simple Goat Herder
                  Former NGTO President
                  Hall of Fame Member

                  Comment


                  • Originally posted by Buck Henry View Post
                    My first home load in 1986 was at 9.5%. But it was a great time if you wanted to earn a great return with almost zero risk. My mom locked her mother's railroad pension money into CD's earning 15% or more and made a killing.
                    Those must of locked in earlier than '86, maybe '81 when mortgage rates hit 18%+? Making that 9.5 look good.
                    I remember VA money @ 14% talk about killing a market, I was holding a couple of spec houses in Enterprise Al. it was ruff .
                    " Is it ignorance or is it apathy?
                    Hey man I don't know and I don't care" Jimmy Buffet

                    Comment


                    • Yep. Dead cat bounce.

                      DJIA as of 12:00 today:

                      -362 Points
                      - 1.45%

                      So looks like 24,000-ish may end up as the settling point.
                      "What's his offense?"
                      "Groping for trouts in a peculiar river."
                      ― William Shakespeare, Measure for Measure

                      Comment


                      • Originally posted by wtbfishin View Post
                        Those must of locked in earlier than '86, maybe '81 when mortgage rates hit 18%+? Making that 9.5 look good.
                        I remember VA money @ 14% talk about killing a market, I was holding a couple of spec houses in Enterprise Al. it was ruff .
                        Yep...it was a crazy time:

                        "What's his offense?"
                        "Groping for trouts in a peculiar river."
                        ― William Shakespeare, Measure for Measure

                        Comment


                        • Nice graph. Makes an interesting overlay with Federal debt (in constant dollars) and Federal debt as a percentage of GDP, which doesn't included the off-book accrued liability for Medicare and Social Security. For a thrill, add-up booked and off-book debt and divide by the number of taxpayers.

                          Comment


                          • For a thrill, add-up booked and off-book debt and divide by the number of taxpayers.
                            And for a real THRILL divide it by the number of actual "tax" payers, not those that file a tax return. It's roughly half of all the those that file tax returns. The number is staggering per person who pays actual federal taxes.

                            My experience most people don't understand the taxes that are paid. Many think just because they see a deduction in their pay stub they are paying taxes. They don't understand that's just the Social Security, Medicare tax.

                            Comment


                            • Originally posted by eyeflyfish View Post
                              And for a real THRILL divide it by the number of actual "tax" payers, not those that file a tax return. It's roughly half of all the those that file tax returns. The number is staggering per person who pays actual federal taxes.

                              My experience most people don't understand the taxes that are paid. Many think just because they see a deduction in their pay stub they are paying taxes. They don't understand that's just the Social Security, Medicare tax.
                              Taxation is theft.

                              Edit: On topic, ranging volatile markets are fun to watch when you have the luxury of being able to hold your positions.
                              -skunked

                              Warning: all posts should be assumed to contain sarcasm and misinformation unless stated otherwise. The opinions shared are not necessarily those of the poster.

                              Comment


                              • Originally posted by I_got_skunked View Post
                                Taxation is theft.

                                Edit: On topic, ranging volatile markets are fun to watch when you have the luxury of being able to hold your positions.
                                ...as are death and uncertainty.

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