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Old 11-06-17, 09:35 AM   #9
MDHerron
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Join Date: Jul 2017
Posts: 23
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I've been very happy with my Cascade (http://amzn.to/2y7BoeD) with added line holder (http://amzn.to/2znq4P6). I have used it to fish dries and even streamers, but lately it's mostly my nymphing rod for when I come across a deep hole on a small stream. Collapsed, it fits just fine in one of the bottle holders on my backpack, and it takes all of 15 seconds to unwind the line and telescope the rod.
Practically, there's not much you can do with a short tenkara rod like mine that you couldn't do with a light fly rod. I've never tried one of the standard 12-15' tenkara rods, and I can't imagine how you would keep one out of the rhododendrons.
Advantages:
No reel. Super lightweight.
Collapsable. This is great for bushwhacking. I don't carry a tube or even sock, since tenkara rods don't have their skinny parts exposed when they're in travel mode (not telescoped).
Easy to carry multiple lengths and types of lined and switch them quickly. I know it's not cannon, but I even use a floating line sometimes. There are lots of options for line keepers, here's a cheap one: http://dragontailtenkara.com/tenkara...eid=727a8ab6d8.
Disadvantages:
No reel. This means that you can't change the length of line at will, so sometimes it will be too long, sometimes too short. But see above about carrying multiple lines.
No reel. If you hook a big fish, there's no way to feed him line if he runs, so unless you're going to chase him downstream, there's a chance he breaks your line. I have caught fish up to 15" with 6x tippet on this rod, but I also left a brown in Montana with a fly in his mouth.
Casting distance is obviously limited to line + rod + arm. This isn't usually a big deal on a small stream.
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