NGTO Message Board
Welcome to NGTO!
Home ] [ Membership ] [ Donations ] [ Feedback ] [ Stream Reviews ] [ Stream Reports ] [ Maps ] [ Events ] [ Articles ] [ Rules and Regulations ] [ Archives ] Message Board ] FAQ ] [ Hall of Fame ] Sponsors & Supporters ] About ] [ Witticisms ] [ Distinguished Members ]
Welcome to NGTO!

Go Back   NGTO Message Board > NGTO Fishing Forums > Ask the Experts
Register Blogs FAQ Members List Calendar Photo Gallery Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 11-26-17, 03:25 PM   #1
aknezo
Native
 
aknezo's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Atlanta
Posts: 280
Default Letís talk flyline

So I got a good deal on a new 8wt setup and am looking into flyline. I havenít gotten into the bass/striper fly game until now so I was wondering what most people use for fly line, either floating or intermediate. I know you can tie on heavier flies to get deeper but is one better than the other in most situations? Iíd mostly be fishing in the hooch and Lanier.
__________________
Aidan Knezo
Follow me on Instagram
Check out my Flickr
aknezo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-26-17, 07:26 PM   #2
ferrulewax
Native
 
ferrulewax's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: Cleveland, Ga
Posts: 615
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by aknezo View Post
So I got a good deal on a new 8wt setup and am looking into flyline. I haven’t gotten into the bass/striper fly game until now so I was wondering what most people use for fly line, either floating or intermediate. I know you can tie on heavier flies to get deeper but is one better than the other in most situations? I’d mostly be fishing in the hooch and Lanier.
Both Floating and intermediate lines have their place- But if I could only have one, I would choose a floating line. Then, if you need your flies deeper, you can use a longer fluorocarbon leader to help assist your flies sinking. For stripers, tying heavy flies isn't a great option, because it can sink the fly out of the strike zone too quickly- you'll find lots of your eats are when the fly is motionless, sinking slowly or suspending.
Basically, a Floating line is much more versatile than an intermediate. Particularly if you also wish to fish for large mounths or shoal bass during other parts of the year.

Some of my my favorite lines for striper fishing are the SA Titan long, Titan, Clear Tip Titan (intermediate), Cortland 444 Big Fly, and Cortland Intermediate Blitz.

We've got a huge selection of SA lines in the shop- including some great lines for stripers, as well as cortland lines. If there is anything you'd like to look at ordering we'd be happy to do that as well.
__________________
Jackson Dockery

My Instagram
Unicoi Outfitters
ferrulewax is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-26-17, 07:51 PM   #3
aknezo
Native
 
aknezo's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Atlanta
Posts: 280
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by ferrulewax View Post
Both Floating and intermediate lines have their place- But if I could only have one, I would choose a floating line. Then, if you need your flies deeper, you can use a longer fluorocarbon leader to help assist your flies sinking. For stripers, tying heavy flies isn't a great option, because it can sink the fly out of the strike zone too quickly- you'll find lots of your eats are when the fly is motionless, sinking slowly or suspending.
Basically, a Floating line is much more versatile than an intermediate. Particularly if you also wish to fish for large mounths or shoal bass during other parts of the year.

Some of my my favorite lines for striper fishing are the SA Titan long, Titan, Clear Tip Titan (intermediate), Cortland 444 Big Fly, and Cortland Intermediate Blitz.

We've got a huge selection of SA lines in the shop- including some great lines for stripers, as well as cortland lines. If there is anything you'd like to look at ordering we'd be happy to do that as well.
Awesome! That's sort of what I was thinking. I like the idea of having both an intermediate and a floating line but I think I'll probably end up with a floating line with a short taper to start off. The majority of the places I'm fishing all the action is right up near the surface anyway so it kind of makes sense to go with that. I also think with the shorter taper floating line one of Rio's versileaders in a smaller sink rate like 1.5-3 ips would work well to get just a bit deeper.
__________________
Aidan Knezo
Follow me on Instagram
Check out my Flickr
aknezo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-26-17, 10:50 PM   #4
JoshKimchi
Native
 
JoshKimchi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: Duluth, Ga
Posts: 110
Default

You may want to start w a sinking line since itís getting to be winter and fish will def be deeper. Rio outbound short is my favorite
JoshKimchi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-27-17, 07:45 AM   #5
JOHNKIES
Hall of Fame Member
 
Join Date: Nov 1998
Location: Laurel Park, NC USA
Posts: 6,122
Default Two Cents

My two cents worth follows great advice so far speaking to the floating line as the best option if you have only one line. But. You see the ads for extra spools so get two lines! Not a lot of people do this but I have come to see all of this as a time to money equation. For most of us, time on the water is very scarce and we need to take maximum advantage of that scarce resource. So if a sinking link can change a so-so or skunked day into a great day, then the extra investment is well worth it.

Also be aware of line variations to conditions. For example, my first 8wt had a salt water line on it and the idea was to chase inshore redfish and trout. But come spring and a chance to fish a private bass pond was a disaster as that salt water line was so stiff and coiled in the cold you could barely cast it!

Make wise choices!
JOHNKIES is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-27-17, 10:51 AM   #6
wtbfishin
Native
 
wtbfishin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Santa Rosa Beach, Fl
Posts: 1,619
Default

If I had only one I'd definitely go with floating and a cheap alternative to have both is to buy a sink tip you can loop on the your floating line . Floating lines are less work to use than sinking lines for me.
My experience with sink lines has been the faster they sink the more of a pain they are to cast and pick up to recast.
Like previously said, sounds like you'll want a line that performs best in colder water.
I have salt lines designated as cold & tropical water and I have started my change out as the water here yesterday showed 60 degrees on the bottom machine.
I also really liked RIO lines, but have recently purchased some micro thin lines from Sunray Fly Fish and found them superior to anything I've thrown in the past, I've tried several of the big name lines and thought RIO was the way to go until now.
They out cast RIO shorts for distance and the thin line lands more like a leader than a bomb, compared to that big fat headed RIO short. I had to try it to believe it but I'm sold now!
__________________
" Is it ignorance or is it apathy?
Hey man I don't know and I don't care" Jimmy Buffet
wtbfishin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-27-17, 06:42 PM   #7
aknezo
Native
 
aknezo's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Atlanta
Posts: 280
Default

Thanks for the suggestions guys. I went with a floating line for now and bought a full set of Rioís Versileaders to test out. I went with the Rio outbound short since Iíve heard nothing but great things from the people whoíve used it and since the shooting style short head will be better suited for the versileaders. I also read a few articles about how the outbound short is one of the best suited lines for a sage one so I think Iíll be well equipped. I think two setups (floating/intermediate) is a good idea down the line but hopefully for now my ghetto rigged floating like with sink tips will work just fine to catch some of the guys.
__________________
Aidan Knezo
Follow me on Instagram
Check out my Flickr
aknezo is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 02:11 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.2
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
vB.Sponsors
Copyright 2010 - North Georgia Trout Online - All Rights Reserved