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Old 11-15-17, 03:58 PM   #41
fishinbub
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If you've never fished around the outlet from a hatchery, you are missing out...
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Old 11-16-17, 01:16 PM   #42
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Originally Posted by fishmonger View Post
Reality check: Fish hatcheries concentrate fish poop into a single outfall, and they also hold many,many more fish than a river does naturally. So, even way downstream, there is much more fish poop in the water in a river that has a hatchery than one that does not.

This does not even get into the issue of disease leaving the hatchery, which is now being recognized as a huge problem even with salmon farms, which are generally floating in the open waters of the ocean and bays.

The Law of Unintended Consequences is very strong in the aquaculture business, whether a facility is run for fun or profit.

FM
Totally agree with you FM, the heightened PPM of food, excrement and other things changes the water a good bit. The one thing that will vary though is due to the size of the river or stream how much it gets dilluted. When I was in Ennis this summer and saw the creek that flows out of the national hatchery I was blown away by how much biomass was in that little creek as a result of the runoff from the hatchery.
The diseases are a whole other issue in itself. Fish can get diseases similar to chickens or other foods that are kept in high population areas with little room to move around. There is a documentary about this and how it has affected the entire global salmon industry but I cannot remember what the name of it is right now.
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Old 12-17-17, 01:06 PM   #43
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Originally Posted by fishinbub View Post
Too bad this article was written 100 years too late...and critiquing present day stocking. So which wild brook trout stream still receives stocked fish again?
North Carolina stocks in creeks that have wild brook trout populations all the time.
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Old 12-17-17, 01:31 PM   #44
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fishmonger View Post
Reality check: Fish hatcheries concentrate fish poop into a single outfall, and they also hold many,many more fish than a river does naturally. So, even way downstream, there is much more fish poop in the water in a river that has a hatchery than one that does not.

This does not even get into the issue of disease leaving the hatchery, which is now being recognized as a huge problem even with salmon farms, which are generally floating in the open waters of the ocean and bays.

The Law of Unintended Consequences is very strong in the aquaculture business, whether a facility is run for fun or profit.

FM
On the flipside, the majority of free stone trout streams are naturally deficient in fecundity, and the nutrient load they carry is pretty minimal. The actual effect is often just to add juice to the local ecosystem for a ways downstream of the discharge, especially since most hatcheries artificially chill and aerate the water that passes through their raceways (meaning hatchery waste outflows are dumping a bunch of extra cold, heavily oxygenated water back into the stream, not just pellets, spent eggs, dead fry and trout poop). I deliberately target hatchery outflows wherever I find them on accessible water; around here, they're a pretty reliable indicator of superior fishing. To name a famous local example, the only difference between the Davidson River, and hundreds of other lower valley big river tribs with wild brown trout in North Carolina is the Setzer Hatchery.

But that's here, on top of all this ancient igneous shield rock, in streams otherwise starved of the nutrients necessary to sustain life. In places where cold streams flow through low lying coastal or alluvial plains with a lot more natural fecundity, I can see it being more problematic.
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Old 12-17-17, 01:35 PM   #45
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The "dead zones" thing the author of the op-ed is laying at the feet of hatcheries is completely absurd, though. We know what causes estuarine dead zones, and, overwhelmingly, it is agricultural effluent and lawn runoff. The nutrient boost from a mountain or upper piedmont hatchery has been siphoned off and converted to living biomass long before it reaches the sea.
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