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Old 11-29-17, 07:37 AM   #21
Dtroutmann
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If you want to fish for wild trout and brookies on small streams with tight quarters try a "Tango" style rod.
What we call "Tenkara" in the US is actually a specific rod made for big waters. Check out www.tenkarabum.com and you will soon find out that there is as much to "tenkara" fishing with a different rod for EVERY situation as there is to Western FF. There are rods at 3',4',5',6',8',9', 10',11',12', 13',14'and 15' and each one seems to have a different name and purpose. I would invest in a decent net with a longer handle to help with landing the fish.
My cousin has quite a few of those style rods and loves it that being said he also has several Western rods as well. You may also like www.finesse-fishing.com as well it's a Japanese style of spin fishing with super light rods and reels.
Have fun out there and post lots of pic of your adventures.
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Last edited by Dtroutmann; 11-29-17 at 07:42 AM.
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Old 11-29-17, 10:47 AM   #22
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Big water = Honryu, or mainstream. This would be fishing on the Hooch near ATL.
There are specific Honryu rods, and they are usually on the longer side, like 4m+.

Fishing the hooch up near Helen would be somewhere between Tenkara and Seiryu. Seiryu is fishing calm (but moving) water for smaller fish.

Keiryu is "mountain stream" fishing, usually with split shot and (live)bait.
Tenkara can be more than one thing, but the straight Japanese definition is fishing for trout/char in a mountain stream using unweighted flies.
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Old 11-29-17, 11:23 AM   #23
splatek16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iso1600 View Post
Big water = Honryu, or mainstream. This would be fishing on the Hooch near ATL.
There are specific Honryu rods, and they are usually on the longer side, like 4m+.

Fishing the hooch up near Helen would be somewhere between Tenkara and Seiryu. Seiryu is fishing calm (but moving) water for smaller fish.

Keiryu is "mountain stream" fishing, usually with split shot and (live)bait.
Tenkara can be more than one thing, but the straight Japanese definition is fishing for trout/char in a mountain stream using unweighted flies.
You're knowledge about Tenkara and it's roots are really interesting.
I for one appreciate all that knowledge; I just cannot seem to grapple with the ramped up cost of things. I am actually the same way when it comes to 'regular" fly gear, as well... as I am sure @Dtroutman will confirm. I regularly fish a cheap rod (eagle claw $12-20) and a super cheap reel; even on bigger water, yeah I have a syndicate, but I am not convinced it actually fishes better (for me) than an Chinese rod I also got for free; my reel was free.

All that being said, tenkara (& it's derivatives) has it's place. I like to use it to teach my boy (and now at least one of his pals) how to "fly fish." Spencer, my boy, ties small flies and rather then using my beads, he ties beadless most time and he can cast these with ease using the relatively inexpensive tenkara rod(s) we have. I've fished a few small north GA streams and I can only imagine using tenkara on maybe 2. The issue, for me, is not the rod length, because I know that they make shorter (than my 12 footer) tenkara rods, but in line management and setting the hook. When I fish the 6-7 foot EC, I can fish at 4 inches above the water, dabbing away, or I can fish at 30 feet. Moreover, when setting the hook using the EC, if necessary, I can do a short strip set (seems crazy on small wild fish, but when reaching through thick rhodo, it's all you got. With a tenk rod, you have to raise the rod tip to set the hook; if there is vegetation... that's not happening.

I remember when I was a kid I had a cane pole; first rod my dad ever bought me, and while we typically tossed mono out to small panfish and bass, if memory serves me correct, there was also a line management system on it; The line ran the length of the bamboo cane and could be pulled in and let out... We never used this function, because pulling panfish out of a neighborhood creek was about as simple as putting a rolled up piece of stale hotdog roll on a barely sharp hook and letting it hit water.
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Old 11-29-17, 11:36 AM   #24
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Splatek- for sure, in some of the more choked and cramped streams, there are limits to what one can do with tenkara/fixed-line fishing. But even in those situations, most fly anglers wouldn't know what to do- you are on the very edge of fishing lol.

I still think that tenkara is much cheaper than fly fishing, because you can get a SUPER bada$$, high-quality Japanese rod for $100-$250, then all you really need is a spool of level line ($15), some tippet and flies.
Fishing with one of these high-quality full-flex rods is a very enjoyable experience, I can't go back to the cheap rods.
I also finally got a better fly rod a few months back and it made normal fly fishing a lot more enjoyable for me.
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