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Old 04-25-18, 10:01 AM   #21
splatek16
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No apologies, no surrender! I want to run through a wall after reading this!

Faith restored - I'm glad someone out there is raising boys with dirt and critters and contact sports.
hahabahahaha.
My parenting handbook comes straight out of the movie 300...
This is Sp.....
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Old 04-25-18, 10:20 AM   #22
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We started taking Wyatt camping when he was 4. He hasn't been "real" backpacking yet, I want to take him on one or two easy overnighters before I head off to Korea- I think he's about ready... Just needs to warm up so we can carry lighter gear!

Start the kids young, and keep it simple at first... state park with a playground. Wyatt LOVES playgrounds more than anything, so eventually we decided no more state parks for him, unless we have zero other plans for the camping trip except just getting outside. If we go to Vogel or similar, all he wants to do is play play play, instead of actually enjoying the trails and creeks and stuff lol.

Glad you guys enjoyed the report, I know we all had a bunch of fun out there!
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Old 04-25-18, 11:01 PM   #23
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How old is your boy? I think the 6-7 year old mark is pretty much perfect to start, although I know a few people have started earlier. I do, however, think there is a critical window of time after which if you haven't done this sort of thing you might lost them to the technological world and they might not be interested in even trying. I know several guys who have the "can't tear my kid away from the XBox (or Playstation or whatever)" problem. I feel fortunate Spencer doesn't really care much for that.
He is 5. He loves the concept of fishing and will tolerate throwing his ultra-lite for a short period of time. He's actually pretty decent at casting it. I think if he were to actually catch something, it would trigger his drive, but we've had no luck so far. The only fish he's caught was about 2 years ago when we day camped with Trout "R" and my mom on the Tallulah. Randy was tearing them up as usual and got him out there and they caught one.

I wasn't exactly raised with one foot in the woods, but we went actual camping most every summer (my birthday is July 8th and I had some very interesting birthdays either dodging tornadoes on the way to Opryland, hitting a deer on the way to a night fishing trip, or swinging through New Orleans on a whirlwind trip). Growing up in the 80's and 90's, I definitely see the need to keep kids much more grounded than they tend to be nowadays. We don't have a game system in the house and he doesn't have free reign of any device. I just recently, very reluctantly, taught him how to hit "continue playing" on Netflix, because he likes to have something going in the background while playing with Legos.

I hope to get him out in the sticks more this summer, especially since he starts kindergarten this year. I recently bought him The Dangerous Book for Boys so he could pick out some things he really wanted to do this summer. I'm hoping that, come this fall, we're hunting down some waders for him so we can keep going on into the cool days.
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Old 04-26-18, 06:54 AM   #24
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I started car camping with my daughters around 4 or 5. I wouldn't consider taking kids in diapers, but my dad did that for my sister!

I started my girls backpacking around age 6 to 7. Our first backpacking trip was on the Chattooga where my dad used to take my sister and me growing up. My dad, my sister, my sister's daughter came with us. 2 older generations passing it down to the new generation. How cool is that?

My girls love camping, hiking, and backpacking. My girls love the woods and nature, and it important to me that they know some things about the natural world. Hardly any of their friends do things outdoors other than organized sports. The world is crazy.
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Old 04-26-18, 07:06 AM   #25
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I started car camping with my daughters around 4 or 5. I wouldn't consider taking kids in diapers, but my dad did that for my sister!



I started my girls backpacking around age 6 to 7. Our first backpacking trip was on the Chattooga where my dad used to take my sister and me growing up. My dad, my sister, my sister's daughter came with us. 2 older generations passing it down to the new generation. How cool is that?



My girls love camping, hiking, and backpacking. My girls love the woods and nature, and it important to me that they know some things about the natural world. Hardly any of their friends do things outdoors other than organized sports. The world is crazy.


This is awesome. We obviously have some awesome parents on this board.

I agree, the world is crazy. I was raised under the principle that "a dirty kid was a happy kid" my parents didn't do much outside with me because they had to work pretty much non stop, but I think they realized the value of their kites playing in the woods. There are now scientific studies showing that being outside in nature is good for humans psychologically. Alternatively, the damage of screen time has also been documented. More kids now need bifocals then ever before in history. More kids live in a State of fear. More kids are seeing chiropractor or neck, spine Drs than ever before for postural issues. The list goes on.

Good on you for getting your girls out there. I think some people expect boys to do it, but your girls are going know more than 99% of the young men they encounter in adult like might only be able to talk about how to beat the next level on the latest video game.


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Old 04-26-18, 09:17 AM   #26
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I recently bought him The Dangerous Book for Boys so he could pick out some things he really wanted to do this summer.
Melissa and I don't have any children, just lots of nieces and nephews. Seeing these responses to a great original post really fills me with hope for this next generation though. The Dangerous Book for Boys is a great way to start. There's another book that I would also recommend when he hits about seven or eight years old.

The Boy Scout Field Book was my favorite book to peruse in the evening before bed during the summers when I was between seven and twelve years old. It was full of lots of ideas for a young-un who loved being outdoors all day long, and the information it provided has served me well into my years as I just turned fifty a few weeks ago. It covers hiking, camping, cooking, hunting, trapping, fishing, first aid (even for serious injuries), knots, lashing structures together, survival in various environments. . . It's FULL of good stuff.

Get a copy of it for your son and give it to him when you think the time is right. Then, let him try out all the things it teaches for himself. Load him up with ten-foot poles and quarter inch sisal rope to lash together a tower structure, or a sheet and a couple poles to make a stretcher. Maybe some twine and a small pocket knife to make a snare to catch small game.

Okay. . . Let's face it. This thread has brought me back to being a ten-year-old wanting to go out and spend a weekend with my dad in the woods. Every one of you dads who are posting here are obviously doing something right. Keep it up and maybe, just maybe, you can save the human race from itself.

Kudos to all y'all!
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Old 04-26-18, 10:19 AM   #27
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Dad goals right here... GREAT stuff.
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Old 04-26-18, 10:35 AM   #28
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Originally Posted by Swamp Angel View Post
Melissa and I don't have any children, just lots of nieces and nephews. Seeing these responses to a great original post really fills me with hope for this next generation though. The Dangerous Book for Boys is a great way to start. There's another book that I would also recommend when he hits about seven or eight years old.

The Boy Scout Field Book was my favorite book to peruse in the evening before bed during the summers when I was between seven and twelve years old. It was full of lots of ideas for a young-un who loved being outdoors all day long, and the information it provided has served me well into my years as I just turned fifty a few weeks ago. It covers hiking, camping, cooking, hunting, trapping, fishing, first aid (even for serious injuries), knots, lashing structures together, survival in various environments. . . It's FULL of good stuff.

Get a copy of it for your son and give it to him when you think the time is right. Then, let him try out all the things it teaches for himself. Load him up with ten-foot poles and quarter inch sisal rope to lash together a tower structure, or a sheet and a couple poles to make a stretcher. Maybe some twine and a small pocket knife to make a snare to catch small game.

Okay. . . Let's face it. This thread has brought me back to being a ten-year-old wanting to go out and spend a weekend with my dad in the woods. Every one of you dads who are posting here are obviously doing something right. Keep it up and maybe, just maybe, you can save the human race from itself.

Kudos to all y'all!
Marcus, I couldn't agree more. I still have my beat up old 1980's era Handbook that I look at occassionally. I bought the latest version of the Handbook a couple of years ago for my then 11 year old. It's actually a great manual for life, teaching things like citizenship, how to fold the flag, how to build a fire, volunteering,,etc.
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Old 04-26-18, 10:41 AM   #29
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Thumbs up BSA Handbook

I still have my BSA handbook and a sash full of merit badges. This was the old school version that speaks of cutting down saplings and real wood fires! 8- ) But I have always said that if I were to be stranded on a desert island but could have two books, one would be the biggest Mark Twain anthology I could find and the other the BSA handbook. Another good book for kids today is "How to $hit in the Woods". Kids love the title and it is loaded with good practical advice. But the best learning is still hands-on. Teach a kid how to build a small fire. Then on the next camping trip, ask them to make the fire. If they ask for advice, answer the question but do not help. The lesson will stick with them for a lifetime.
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Old 04-26-18, 11:57 AM   #30
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I have always said that if I were to be stranded on a desert island but could have two books, one would be the biggest Mark Twain anthology I could find and the other the BSA handbook.
Would these help on that desert island? (Yes, that's an original first edition of Tom Sawyer Abroad on the right.)

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