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Old 05-28-18, 08:40 AM   #1
mbailey729
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Default Blue line recs for some specks

Looking for a new spot to hit to try and catch some native brookies. Have had success on some small creeks outside Helen (I learned last year not to mention creek names on here) and was wondering if anyone has any suggestions. This map appears to show where they may be but Iíd rather have some reliable info if we are going to drive 1.5+ hr to give it a go


And here are some of the fish I caught last time I went blue lining (with the help of some on here)


Last edited by Swamp Angel; 05-28-18 at 09:31 AM.
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Old 05-28-18, 10:05 AM   #2
buckman1
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Part of the fun with specks is finding them yourself. Trial and error. Climbing waterfalls, hiking stream beds, wading laurel, weaving through rhododendron, watching for rattlesnakes, going up feeders and always trying new thoughts... then itís fun trying to find true specks (southern Appalachian brook trout, or SABTís) vs wild northern strain Brookeís that are similar but different. The fish in your pic looks like the northern cousin, and, obviously just a guess, came from a creek that has a popular hiking trail paralleling it?

The map you posted is a good starting point, there are a few more places that have them that arenít on the map. Iíd be cheating your experience if I pmíd you more intel. Finding them is more of an adventure than catching them. An 1.5 hr drive is chump change. I live in speck country, and it takes an hour and a half on some of these FS roads from where I live! Good luck in your quest!
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Old 05-28-18, 10:34 AM   #3
mbailey729
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Quote:
Originally Posted by buckman1 View Post
Part of the fun with specks is finding them yourself. Trial and error. Climbing waterfalls, hiking stream beds, wading laurel, weaving through rhododendron, watching for rattlesnakes, going up feeders and always trying new thoughts... then itís fun trying to find true specks (southern Appalachian brook trout, or SABTís) vs wild northern strain Brookeís that are similar but different. The fish in your pic looks like the northern cousin, and, obviously just a guess, came from a creek that has a popular hiking trail paralleling it?

The map you posted is a good starting point, there are a few more places that have them that arenít on the map. Iíd be cheating your experience if I pmíd you more intel. Finding them is more of an adventure than catching them. An 1.5 hr drive is chump change. I live in speck country, and it takes an hour and a half on some of these FS roads from where I live! Good luck in your quest!
I agree that the search/adventure is the most rewarding part, but when I only get my wife to go fishing with me once or maybe twice a year I like to at least let her catch a fish in hopes she will join me more often
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Old 05-28-18, 11:34 AM   #4
splatek16
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I think if you go anywhere close to that map you'll catch fish. Whether you'll catch brook trout or sabt is up to Tye fishing gods, like buckman1 said

When you find them in an unknown spot... Like finding treasure.

Andi agree tat speck looks like a hybrid, but I also know they change color a lot. I know exactly where buckman1 is talking about and gave actually hooked into what I think are hybrids and true sabt outta that watershed. It's a great resource.


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Old 05-29-18, 05:24 AM   #5
Gnatt
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I have found them at higher elevations in some of those red areas. For me it was always a "gravel or dirt road trip," then a hike.
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Old 05-29-18, 09:06 AM   #6
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Like the others have said finding them yourself is really half the fun. I would recommend getting a couple good waterproof maps to carry with you. Atlantic mapping has a very good map of the north Ga wildlife management areas. Some other good maps to have are the Nat Geo Chattahoochee National forest maps. Any one of these would be good to carry with you so you can refer to them while you are out bluelining.

I actually will look at the maps at home and mark with a sharpie streams I want to go visit. After I go fish one I will go back and remark the stream on my map with a different color sharpie depending on if I found brookies, rainbows, browns, a mix of fish or if I found a cool waterfall etc. Itís pretty cool cause it gives you a way to map where you have been and what you have found.
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Old 05-29-18, 09:29 AM   #7
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I also live 1.5 hrs away and yes, it's a long drive to hike for five hours on empty water, but ... you can do a surprising amount of speck detective work from the comfort of your house.

In general, you're looking for altitude, some kind of barrier (typically falls, but gorges, fast flows, narrow contours, and other kinds of features can exclude bows), thick foliage, scant or no development upslope, and general remoteness. Sometimes this works well - other times not at all. Or other times you'll find specks, go again and catch nothing, and then wonder if you just got skunked or if they're gone for good.

If you take a systematic approach, and aren't afraid to get out there a bunch of times and not find specks, you'll find that you start to target high-probability speck waters from afar with a modest amount of trial and error. Agree with the other posters that it's not as simple as directions, though - the surviving specks have hung on in the most retired corners of the state through thick and thin, to get to where they are requires a bit of personal rewilding. Best journey you'll ever take. Get out there!
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Old 05-29-18, 06:58 PM   #8
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Buy one of those Nat Geo maps WesMac mentioned. The Brasstown Bald/Tooga River map is the one you want. Put together a list of the confirmed brookie streams you know of, look at them on the map (especially the elevation) and then try to find similar streams. If you are above 2k feet, there will be trout. They may not be brookies, but it'll still be worth the drive.
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Old 06-03-18, 09:36 AM   #9
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Found some nice fish yesterday



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