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Old 08-20-10, 09:40 PM   #31
cucarachafly
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Default Not good!

Saw at least a 22 incher float by my place today just as the generation started- dead as a doornail! No camera but my phone and it was too far away for a decent picture. Spoke with a couple kayakers who said they saw 4 or 5 good size fish dead as well. So are the big ones the first to go in the chain of events?
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Old 08-20-10, 10:08 PM   #32
David Hulsey
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Sounds like it could be stress from water temps, increased oxygen demands, or anglers playing their fish too long or not reviving them well under these conditions. You can expect to see more if weather conditions do not change.
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Old 08-21-10, 08:58 AM   #33
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It sounds like if you are going to fish the Toccoa, in the near future, you might as well bring a stringer along.
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Old 08-23-10, 10:23 PM   #34
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Results I recorded from water monitoring at Hogback on Sunday (one before generation began and one after):

Date: Aug. 22, 2010
Time: 1:00 p.m.
Air Temp: 27 c (87.6 f)
Water Temp: 24 c (75.2 f)
Dissolved Oxy: 8.5 ppm
cfs: 188


Date: Aug 22, 2010
Time: 4:30 p.m.
Air Temp: 29 c (84.2 f)
Water Temp: 23 c (73.4 f)
Dissolved Oxy: 8.5 ppm
cfs 1,570


Compared with last week, temps still creeping up with 24 degrees c. the highest I've recorded. But the DO remains good and is in fact a little higher.

In response to a question from Julian, I'm using a LaMotte Dissolved Oxygen kit that utilizes the Winkler Tritration Method to determine DO, not as exact as some lab-level analysises, but something a layman like myself can manage for a reading in the .2 +/- ppm range.

All I know to do at this point is keep our fingers crossed.

John Pool
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Old 08-25-10, 09:27 PM   #35
Becky Hulsey
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Here is the latest info from John Damer on the tailwater:

Quick update on tailwater temps:Yesterday we downloaded temperature data from 2 out of 4 thermographs that we have recording in the tailwater. One is located near the dam,and the other is down near McCaysville. Water temp at the dam has not been below 70*F since the 19th, and at McCaysville it has been since the 13th. Water temperatures have been peaking just under 80*F down in McCaysville. There is little relief from the tribs either. Checked Weaver, Hemptown, Hothouse, and Wolf Creeks last week and they were allover 72*F (Weaver Creek was 77.5*F).
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Old 08-25-10, 09:38 PM   #36
Becky Hulsey
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Default A Slow Death of the Toccoa Tailwater

Riley checked the temperature below the dam yesterday. It was 76 degrees. Several reports of dead fish here and there. Remember pictures say a thousand words.

I feel as though I am watching the slow death of one of the best fisheries in the Southeast.

No matter how much you prepare for the worst. You realize your never really prepared...
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Old 08-26-10, 11:10 AM   #37
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I knew the cold water wouldn't last with such a quick drawdown. The TVA could have started an early normal lake drawdown but hey, they are self serving. Look at what they did to the Clinch in Kingston. Distroyed a great striper fishery.

I disagree that the Toccoa is one of the best but it is a good fishery. It's fun to fish and it's in a great area. It can be restocked when water temps drop.
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Old 08-28-10, 06:19 PM   #38
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RIP

Someone know a good lawyer? IMHO, property owners along the tailwater and all the guides have a fairly good case. Make that a real good case with proper recording of dead fish pics and temp readings.
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Old 08-29-10, 02:10 PM   #39
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Quote:
Originally Posted by clewis1014 View Post
RIP

Someone know a good lawyer? IMHO, property owners along the tailwater and all the guides have a fairly good case. Make that a real good case with proper recording of dead fish pics and temp readings.
Good luck with that.
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Old 08-30-10, 07:26 PM   #40
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Default Is There Hope for the Toccoa?

I fished the S. Holston this past weekend and met a fisheries Biologist at the Weir Dam and I explained to him our scenario. In his opinion he said that the Toccoa tail waters cannot sustain the high water temperatures for very long along with constant generation. Even though the dissolved oxygen is high, the fish use more energy and oxygen during higher flows. If the water temps do not get below 70 degrees along with sustained high dissolved oxygen then death of the rivers trout and insects is inevitable.

He also said that the DNR should shut down fishing for trout all together during this critical stage. They had a similar scenario on a TVA tail water in Tennessee several years back and were able to save the river because they got the TVA to stop generation until cooler weather prevailed and they stopped fishing in the interim.

So may I ask what is wrong with our DNR? Why have they not put their foot down with the TVA? I thought our DNR is in charge of the fish? They TVA clearly ignored the DNR request to wait and look where we are at. So much for the Trout Capital of Georgia. Its more like the Trout Graveyard of Georgia now.

A common epitaph may read;

" Here lies Big Brother Brown, after many years of outsmarting the anglers it took the ignorance of the TVA to finally take him down" Rest in Peace Brother Brown !!

A little edgy yes but I am very sad for the many businesses that rely on this fishery to survive. BP had to pay the fisherman for their mistakes so maybe the TVA should pay the local businesses the same.
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