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Old 08-12-10, 04:48 PM   #11
Jimmy Harris
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Just got this report from Ralph Artigliere:

Report on the tailwater: It fished really well today. I got in about 11:30 am and it was 69 degrees using a mercury thermometer and when I got out at 2:15 it was 71 degrees just a few hundred yards downstream. The fish were very cooperative, and nearly 50% were the browns DNR stocked a couple months ago. They have not traveled very far, but they are spread out.

None were really big (except one rainbow that took me from one bank to the other into a snag and broke off my leader and flies). The fish all seemed healthy (even the horny head I caught) and surprisingly fat in many cases. Since all but one were not giants and the water was a bit off color, I was able to use 4x flouro and bring them in quick so all were spry when released.
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Old 08-16-10, 04:22 PM   #12
Becky Hulsey
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Default Update on Tailwater temperatures

David got the temperature of the river and looked at water conditions today at three public access areas on the tailwater. Here are his findings:

Tammen Park: Temp 70 degrees F
Unable to see the bottom, water was not clear
A few fish rising

Curtis Switch: Temp 73 degrees F
Water was noted to be somewhat clearer
No fish activity noted

Horseshoe Bend Park: Temp 74 degrees F
Able to see rocks on the bottom
No fish activity noted
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Old 08-16-10, 05:27 PM   #13
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I just stopped by Horseshoe Bend around 4:30 today and talked to a father and daughter up from Florida visiting and they were at the park fishing from about lunch on. They caught no fish and reported seeing at least a half a dozen floating by belly-up including one "quite large" as the father explained.

After dinner I am going to get official end of the day temps from the same locations as Becky Hulsey posted earlier to see if the day time highs today took the water over the top of the threshold. I certainly hope not. Lets hope our baby's in the tail waters are tough trout. I am also going to talk with one of the landowners that feeds regularly and see what he has to say. I will report my findings later.
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Old 08-16-10, 08:20 PM   #14
Becky Hulsey
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Default Post your reports on the tailwater

Thanks for your report Trout Addict.

I have heard reports of 6 dead fish at Horseshoe Bend Park yesterday and 1 dead 10 pound rainbow at the Tammen Park area on Saturday. These were reports given to me. I did not see them.

I look forward to hearing your findings.

Also, please forward any findings to GA DNR. They appreciate reports from anglers.

Last edited by Becky Hulsey; 08-16-10 at 09:20 PM.
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Old 08-16-10, 08:24 PM   #15
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FYI: Copying a relevant link that Jimmy Harris posted in another thread:

http://www.unicoiliarsclub.com/2010/...threatens.html
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Old 08-16-10, 09:14 PM   #16
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Arrow Toccoa River Temp Update

My son and I took a road trip and here is our findings. These temps were taken between 6:45 and 7:45 pm this evening.

Tammen Park 70.4
Curtis Switch 74.8
Horseshoe Bend 75.3

Readings were taken with a digital stream thermometer.

No dead fish seen.
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Old 08-16-10, 09:14 PM   #17
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Did an Adopt-A-Stream monitoring session today at Hogback, one before the generation began and one afterwards (the only thing that changed was the air temp. and cfs.), and recorded the following data:

Date: Aug 16
Time 11:00 A.M.
DO 8.4 ppm
Water temp. 22 c (71.6 f)
Air temp. 26c (78.8f)
Flow 137 cfs

Date Aug 16
Time 3:00 p.m.
DO 8.4 ppm
Water temp 22 c (71.6 f)
Air temp 31 c (87.8 f)
Flow 1653 cfs

Water stained much more than normal.



A question I have for some of you more scientific-minded folks: It's my understanding that the amount of dissolved oxygen (DO) water can hold decreases as the temperature increases (colder water can sustain more dissolved oxygen than warmer water). If I understand correctly, trout might not survive lengthy periods of 75 degree f. water, but its not a direct result of being exposed this temperature per se, but because they suffocate from the decreased oxygen that 75 degree water contains -- Is it the DO levels, not the temp. that gets them? On the Toccoa tailwater, we've seen the temps rise substantially during the past week (from 64 f to over 71 f) but the DO levels have remained constant at a little over 8 ppm at Hogback. So can the oxygen infusion system at the dam keep the DO levels high enough for the fish to survive higher temps than would be possible in natural free-flowing stream?

-- J Pool
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Old 08-16-10, 11:26 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dragonfly Man View Post
A question I have for some of you more scientific-minded folks: It's my understanding that the amount of dissolved oxygen (DO) water can hold decreases as the temperature increases (colder water can sustain more dissolved oxygen than warmer water). If I understand correctly, trout might not survive lengthy periods of 75 degree f. water, but its not a direct result of being exposed this temperature per se, but because they suffocate from the decreased oxygen that 75 degree water contains -- Is it the DO levels, not the temp. that gets them? On the Toccoa tailwater, we've seen the temps rise substantially during the past week (from 64 f to over 71 f) but the DO levels have remained constant at a little over 8 ppm at Hogback. So can the oxygen infusion system at the dam keep the DO levels high enough for the fish to survive higher temps than would be possible in natural free-flowing stream?
Great question, Mr. Pool! Looks like maybe you are on to something here. Here is some information I found from a group sponsored by the State of Wisconsin DNR and Univerity of Wisconsin.

Both plants and animals depend on dissolved oxygen for survival. Lack of
dissolved oxygen can cause aquatic animals (e.g. fish,macroinvertebrates) to quickly leave the area or face death. Under low oxygen conditions, the
aquatic animal community changes quickly. Under extreme conditions, lack of oxygen can kill aquatic plants and animals. Measuring dissolved oxygen is probably the most significant water quality test to determine the suitability of a stream for fish and many other aquatic organisms.

Different aquatic organisms have different oxygen needs. Trout and stoneflies, for example, require high dissolved oxygen levels. Trout need water with at least 6 mg/L D.O. Warm water fish like bass and
bluegills survive nicely at 5 mg/L D.O. and some organisms like carp and bloodworms can survive on less than 1 mg/L D.O. The oxygen demand of aquatic plants and cold-blooded animals also varies with water temperature. A trout uses five times more oxygen while resting at 80 F (26.7 C.) than at 40 F (4.4 C).


Aquatic plants produce oxygen by photosynthesis during daylight hours but they also use oxygen for respiration. During the night or on heavily overcast days, respiration removes oxygen while photosynthesis stops or
drastically slows down. Oxygen depletion can occur because of heavy plant growth. Complete depletion of D.O. can sometimes be detected
with your nose. Anaerobic decay results in a rotten egg smell (hydrogen sulfide gas)

While fishing on Saturday, there was definitely a faint smell described above but, nonetheless, your DO findings appear encouraging anyway! I actually had a pretty productive day on Saturday catching about a dozen or so with most going 12 to 14 inches. They appeared rather healthy, too. Even though I got 'em in quick and didn't even lift them out of the water when removing the hook, all of them swam away quickly.

Those that know me know that I am definitely not "scientific-minded" by any stretch of the imagination, but it sure looks like, just by doing a little reading, that the recorded DO levels found in these measurements sure can't hurt anything. I wonder what a night-time measurement might show when the photosynthesis stops? (hint, hint, Mr. Pool ) I guess it's OK to find a little hope in positive DO levels, right?
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Old 08-17-10, 08:01 AM   #19
Becky Hulsey
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Exclamation Update and Fishing Recommendations with high temps

Yesterday, I received this information from John Damer (GA DNR Fisheries Biologist):

Our last data exchange covered up to midnight on Tuesday night 8/10. At that point water temps recorded at the dam had just crossed the 20*C mark. Still no change in the rate of water temperature increase. But, this was before TVA slowed down their average daily discharge rates, and we may still experience some cooling effect (or at least a decease in the rate of warming) from that. We will receive a new week's worth of data this Thursday, and will know more then.

One thing you can help with is to remind anglers that catch-and-release mortality can be high when temperatures hit 70*F and above. Here are just a few suggestions for folks who intend to fish the tailwater or other streams that are getting warm.
1) Fish with heavier line/tippet than normal. You may not hook as many fish, but that 24" inch bow is going to take "hours" to land on 7x tippet, and probably won't last long if you plan to release it.
2) Along the lines of #1, don't overplay the fish. Often the most exciting part of catching a fish is feel them tug on the end of your line. Some anglers (especially less experienced ones) tend to keep the fish on for A LOT longer than needed to extend that experience. I watched an angler last week at Tammen Park play a 14" brown for three or four minutes while his rod was barely bent. I estimated that a more experienced fisherman could have hooked, played, landed, and released two or three fish of similar size in that time (if the fish were willing to bite, of course).
3) Keep pictures and handling time to a minimum. The fish are already stressed from the high temps and the fight you just put them through. Leaving them out of the water to get that perfect shot for your desktop background may make the difference between life and death for the fish.
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Old 08-17-10, 10:38 PM   #20
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Great information, Becky. Thanks for posting. Here is some more information that came across my email from someone that has some good knowledge of trout in response to Dragonfly Man's earlier question. This is encouraging.

Your understanding of the relationship of DO concentration and water temp is correct. We can manipulate that relationship (to a degree) by infusing pure oxygen. The infusion system in the lake is the same method that we use to maintain acceptable DO levels in our transport tanks. 8 ppm in the river is encouraging! My trout are very happy at 8 ppm, however we do try to minimize any conditions that cause stress. Trout are susceptible to stress induced illness and some of the pathogens are more active at higher temps. If I could choose a water temp for my hatchery it would be 58 degrees F. If you catch trout in these stressful conditions, try to release before they are exhausted. Again, 8 ppm DO in the river is good news! Keep those tiny bubbles rising!
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