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Old 06-08-18, 11:11 AM   #11
mudrun
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Thanks, Dylar - I had a few nymphs that might have worked yesterday but didn't try them.

Here's another question - the rains washed a crap-ton of debris down and around, took out some embankments, and turned others soft. There was a lot of large detritus clogging up seemingly every spill deeper than six inches.

I am curious if this might have been enough rain to wash specks over barrier falls and into places where specks often aren't, which would mean tigers in some creeks next year.

But is the timing right? I think we'd want it more towards August/Sept... but maybe not...
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Old 06-08-18, 03:39 PM   #12
Dylar
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mudrun View Post
Thanks, Dylar - I had a few nymphs that might have worked yesterday but didn't try them.

Here's another question - the rains washed a crap-ton of debris down and around, took out some embankments, and turned others soft. There was a lot of large detritus clogging up seemingly every spill deeper than six inches.

I am curious if this might have been enough rain to wash specks over barrier falls and into places where specks often aren't, which would mean tigers in some creeks next year.

But is the timing right? I think we'd want it more towards August/Sept... but maybe not...
My understanding from the biologists—and it matches my personal experience, for what it's worth, is that it takes a whale of flood to really significantly displace wild trout. Stockers, with their tank friendly genetics, generally poor conditioning and frequently ravaged fins get blown about a good bit more.

Now el Tigre is a favorite topic of conversation among blueliners in these parts, but it's all rank speculation without much in the way of information inputs. My guess is you need it to get and stay cold really early in the year, or perhaps really late, but "guess" is the relevant word here; it's not based on even anecdotal observation, much less actual data.
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Old 06-09-18, 09:07 AM   #13
jonmo
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[quote=Counslrman;899973]...something else...over the years I have noticed that after significant rains, there is more food in the trough, so to speak...bugs, worms, and critters get displaced from riparian dwelling places...fish get active responding to the abundance of food...

Same experience for me Jimmy..Summer in general is good for terrestrials, but during and after a shower lots of them get washed in..I have success with ant patterns in those conditions.
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