NGTO Message Board
Welcome to NGTO!
Home ] [ Membership ] [ Donations ] [ Feedback ] [ Stream Reviews ] [ Stream Reports ] [ Maps ] [ Events ] [ Articles ] [ Rules and Regulations ] [ Archives ] Message Board ] FAQ ] [ Hall of Fame ] Sponsors & Supporters ] About ] [ Witticisms ] [ Distinguished Members ]
Welcome to NGTO!

Go Back   NGTO Message Board > Fishing Reports > N. Georgia Small Streams--Trout Reports
Register Blogs FAQ Members List Calendar Photo Gallery Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 10-18-18, 12:10 PM   #11
Dylar
Native
 
Dylar's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2017
Posts: 296
Default

Most of the largest rainbows are fall/early winter spawners. Look at the fins and conditioning on that fish, though, almost certainly wild.
Dylar is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-19-18, 10:07 AM   #12
browniez
NGTO Hall of Fame
 
browniez's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: Hamilton Mill
Posts: 1,500
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Buck Henry View Post
Cuffing season
__________________
I like em big fat and sloppy.
browniez is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-19-18, 10:19 AM   #13
ChaChung
Native
 
ChaChung's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Location: Johns Creek, GA
Posts: 480
Default

Man... That's a crazy nice rainbow. Congrats.
__________________
Hi my name is Charles and I'm a fishaholic.

Some days I'm the hook and some days I'm the fish.

Instagram @charles_the_toothsmith
ChaChung is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-19-18, 09:09 PM   #14
trad bow
Native
 
Join Date: Apr 2016
Posts: 36
Default

Awesome fish. A lifetime catch in a wild steam in Georgia.
trad bow is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-20-18, 10:21 PM   #15
Killer Kyle
Native
 
Killer Kyle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: The Hills
Posts: 469
Default

That stream is a decent stream. It has been good to me in past years. I manage to get on 1-2 gooduns each year there. I wish more fatties would swim up and down stream there and end up in the public stretch, but I'm satisfied with 1 or 2 good hawgs each year. Interestingly, the downstream stretch has always produced the biggins for me. I never have caught a pellet fed slob at the upstream part of the stretch.

As for the breeding behavior, bows really are not supposed to exhibit that behavior this time of year, but we are on the outer peripheral of trout habitat in the southern U.S. Especially that stream you fished. Drive just 5-10 miles south on that river, and there are no trout in that stream. It is barely a trout stream to begin with. With a wide varience in water temps, extremely heavy fishing pressure, and different genetic strains of stocked fish, its easy to see that oddball behavior can occur. There's a lot of unnatural and "wonky' things going on in the water there. I once scooped up a dead bullhead catfish in my trout net there in the same pool that I caught a 20" rainbow in the year before. Also caught largemouth bass in that same pool. Its a place where mostly warmwater gamefish can survive, and often do, and where a SUPER hardy trout can barely survive. If the conditions are right there, a big trout might actually be able to survive the summer there.

I've had many a brown trout and brook trout "christen" me with milt on the Smith Creek DH in January, February, and March. Hens with eggs too.
I'm sure the artificial production of trout and release of them into streams at that time has a lot to do with it. I'm not saying its a bad thing, but I believe it does impact a trout's natural patterns. Browns should never be squirting milt on you in February, but it has probably happened to me just short of a dozen times in the Feb. time frame. That ain't natural.
Killer Kyle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-21-18, 12:15 PM   #16
Dylar
Native
 
Dylar's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2017
Posts: 296
Default

Plenty of wild bows spawn in the fall and early winter in their native range, hence fall and winter run steelhead, and there's tremendous variation in the timing of the brown trout spawn within its native range, as well. You have to keep in mind the vast genetic diversity of these fish; the brown trout of Ireland alone are more genetically diverse than humans full stop, and that's not including the impact of the better part of two centuries of hatchery rearing.

Keep in mind that no trout has ever so much as owned a calendar. They are triggered to spawn by a combination of flow levels, water temps and light levels, all of which vary widely from location to location. There is nothing unusual about a rainbow trout on a bed in fall or a brown still jacked with egg mass or milt in midwinter.

Last edited by Dylar; 10-21-18 at 02:31 PM.
Dylar is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-22-18, 09:42 AM   #17
UpstateFishing
Native
 
UpstateFishing's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Posts: 421
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dylar View Post
Plenty of wild bows spawn in the fall and early winter in their native range, hence fall and winter run steelhead, and there's tremendous variation in the timing of the brown trout spawn within its native range, as well. You have to keep in mind the vast genetic diversity of these fish; the brown trout of Ireland alone are more genetically diverse than humans full stop, and that's not including the impact of the better part of two centuries of hatchery rearing.

Keep in mind that no trout has ever so much as owned a calendar. They are triggered to spawn by a combination of flow levels, water temps and light levels, all of which vary widely from location to location. There is nothing unusual about a rainbow trout on a bed in fall or a brown still jacked with egg mass or milt in midwinter.
Although I'm no expert on trout biology, I have caught a lake run brown in March that was full of eggs. I doubt they only spawn in October and November too although the bulk most likely do.
UpstateFishing is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-22-18, 11:50 AM   #18
Philhutch80
Native
 
Philhutch80's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Location: The GreATL!!!
Posts: 1,086
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Killer Kyle View Post
That stream is a decent stream. It has been good to me in past years. I manage to get on 1-2 gooduns each year there. I wish more fatties would swim up and down stream there and end up in the public stretch, but I'm satisfied with 1 or 2 good hawgs each year. Interestingly, the downstream stretch has always produced the biggins for me. I never have caught a pellet fed slob at the upstream part of the stretch.

As for the breeding behavior, bows really are not supposed to exhibit that behavior this time of year, but we are on the outer peripheral of trout habitat in the southern U.S. Especially that stream you fished. Drive just 5-10 miles south on that river, and there are no trout in that stream. It is barely a trout stream to begin with. With a wide varience in water temps, extremely heavy fishing pressure, and different genetic strains of stocked fish, its easy to see that oddball behavior can occur. There's a lot of unnatural and "wonky' things going on in the water there. I once scooped up a dead bullhead catfish in my trout net there in the same pool that I caught a 20" rainbow in the year before. Also caught largemouth bass in that same pool. Its a place where mostly warmwater gamefish can survive, and often do, and where a SUPER hardy trout can barely survive. If the conditions are right there, a big trout might actually be able to survive the summer there.

I've had many a brown trout and brook trout "christen" me with milt on the Smith Creek DH in January, February, and March. Hens with eggs too.
I'm sure the artificial production of trout and release of them into streams at that time has a lot to do with it. I'm not saying its a bad thing, but I believe it does impact a trout's natural patterns. Browns should never be squirting milt on you in February, but it has probably happened to me just short of a dozen times in the Feb. time frame. That ain't natural.
I think I know the stream and I need to revisit it if it is where I believe this took place. I agree that it is mostly marginal at best in regards to sustaining trouts. BUT as you noted, I have seen similar signs of spawning when there should not be. Superbowl sunday 2018 I caught a nice 14" male brown that was all humpbacked and in spawning colors and shot milt all over the place. Kyle, if you get the chance in your travels to go to the Ennis National Fish Hatchery in Ennis, MT. Rock Creek is nice and has good info, but it paled in comparison to what I learned at Ennis.
Just as Dylar has noted with the steelhead, the government has at least eight different phenotypes of bows that all spawn at different times of year. It would be entirely plausible for populations to evolve to handle warmer climates with different light & temp cycles as well. After all, it's all about keeping the species going at all cost instinctually which could mean a flux in breeding cycles. Really makes you wonder if focusing so much on a few critical factors to find strains that would make good stockers is also slowly influencing the genetic crop of fish, imo.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dylar View Post
Plenty of wild bows spawn in the fall and early winter in their native range, hence fall and winter run steelhead, and there's tremendous variation in the timing of the brown trout spawn within its native range, as well. You have to keep in mind the vast genetic diversity of these fish; the brown trout of Ireland alone are more genetically diverse than humans full stop, and that's not including the impact of the better part of two centuries of hatchery rearing.

Keep in mind that no trout has ever so much as owned a calendar. They are triggered to spawn by a combination of flow levels, water temps and light levels, all of which vary widely from location to location. There is nothing unusual about a rainbow trout on a bed in fall or a brown still jacked with egg mass or milt in midwinter.
Which when you say 'Georgia Kamloops' or 'North Carolina Steelhead' it catches people off guard because they do not think of the origin of these species that have been selected as stock to be used for STIT's. They very well could be from Alaska or Britis Colombia or the UP of Michigan and those fish spawn very differently than what we are used to seeing here.

Quote:
Originally Posted by UpstateFishing View Post
Although I'm no expert on trout biology, I have caught a lake run brown in March that was full of eggs. I doubt they only spawn in October and November too although the bulk most likely do.
Rememer also that it makes me wonder if the fish down in say New Zealand operate on the completely switched schedule as a result of their seasons being opposite of ours. There is just still so much we do not understand about trout and they are the longest scientifically studied fish species in the world.
__________________
#JBNavy

"Everyday is a new life to a wise man."
-Chinese Proverb

“At sunrise everything is luminous but not clear.”
-Norman Maclean

"We are what we hunt."
-PH
Philhutch80 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-30-18, 02:07 PM   #19
Aardvark
Native
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Wetumpka, AL
Posts: 437
Default

There is always the unknown cold water spring or tributary that attracts trout into a small area. Here in Alabama, a small cold water refuge will attract large numbers of stripers that are not that much more tolerant of warm water than trout. I have also come across some feeder creeks that feed into the warm waters of the Coosa that are surprisingly cold. Not trout cold, but cool enough to be noticeable in the surrounding warm water. I'm sure the fish pick up on that, but catching them on a calm and shallow sandy flat is pretty much impossible when wading. One foot in the water, and everything spooks. I have caught some stripers in that cooler water when the turbines are running for the kayakers though. Then the problem is chest deep water and fast currents. The odd spring also feeds some secret trout water over here. Most are off limits to public fishing, but they are out there.
Aardvark is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 10:06 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.2
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
vB.Sponsors
Copyright 2010 - North Georgia Trout Online - All Rights Reserved