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Old 12-13-16, 08:57 AM   #1
splatek16
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Default B dam h2o release effect?

Hey all, sorry for the total newb question and seriously apologetic if this question has been asked and answered a million times. I searched the hooch forum and the main forum, but couldn't see anything too specific about this topic.

I am curious if there are any resources that describe (in relatively good detail, I'm a scientist) the effects of Buford Dam water release on fishing at locations down stream in the upper hooch areas? I am particularly interested in how it effects Settles Bridge, because that's close to me, but also McGinnis, Jones, etc.

I know that the "waters will rise and are a danger to people on the river" - I now know the number to call and all that, but I am more curious about the effects on the actual fish, fishing, fish behavior, etc? If that data is available can anyone share please?

Thanks,
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Old 12-13-16, 09:53 AM   #2
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Generally we do extremely well just after a release.

My personal crackpot theory is that the increased levels of dissolved oxygen, especially during turnover, get them fired up.

I don't have any data to back that up though.
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Old 12-13-16, 09:54 AM   #3
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http://www.georgia-outdoors.com/foru...couring+effect

I found this when I used the term "scouring effect" as my search criteria.
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Old 12-13-16, 11:13 AM   #4
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Good post Gbram, thanks for that reference.
I ran into this lady one time in Wisconsin who worked with the "Hydropower Reform Coalition", and she was surprised to hear about the way the dam is utilized here in georgia (i.e. with the heavy releases followed by long non-activity). She would suggest some changes to that but I'm in no way qualified to discuss those really.
I too would be interested to hear more and know more about all this.
I'm not sure all the reasoning behind why we use the dam in the way we do, nor on the effects it has on the wildlife, but that scouring effect is interesting.

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Old 12-13-16, 01:22 PM   #5
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Thanks guys. Just read a bit about the scouring effect... interesting stuff.
I was thinking about heading over this afternoon, but looks like life is going to get in the way of that...
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Old 12-13-16, 01:28 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by browniez View Post
Generally we do extremely well just after a release.

My personal crackpot theory is that the increased levels of dissolved oxygen, especially during turnover, get them fired up.

I don't have any data to back that up though.
Good to know. So how much time after do you think based on the amount of time it takes for the water to reach the different parts of the river? For example, it takes 4 hours for the water to reach Abbotts bridge. Should I start fishing there (or near there) 6 hours after the water reaches AB or several hours after? What's worked for you?
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Old 12-13-16, 05:08 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by joshM View Post
Good to know. So how much time after do you think based on the amount of time it takes for the water to reach the different parts of the river? For example, it takes 4 hours for the water to reach Abbotts bridge. Should I start fishing there (or near there) 6 hours after the water reaches AB or several hours after? What's worked for you?
http://www.georgia-outdoors.com/foru...ad.php?t=63741

See post #2 in the attached thread and you'll have what you need, I believe.
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Old 12-13-16, 05:19 PM   #8
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I dont think he is asking about release times or safety advice, from what I read he is asking about how fish feeding acitivity is affected by the high fast water
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Old 12-13-16, 05:48 PM   #9
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Originally Posted by zug buggin View Post
I dont think he is asking about release times or safety advice, from what I read he is asking about how fish feeding acitivity is affected by the high fast water
Thanks Zug, yes, that's right. I wasn't as clear as I could have been in my previous post (and based on the times in the linked forum post I was off by about 30 minutes give or take on when the water arrives at Abbots Bridge!)

Someone further up the thread said that the fish are more active after the water is released and I was trying to determine how much longer after the water from the release reaches the various points on the river it would be need for the fish to become more active.
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Old 12-13-16, 07:33 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by joshM View Post
Thanks Zug, yes, that's right. I wasn't as clear as I could have been in my previous post (and based on the times in the linked forum post I was off by about 30 minutes give or take on when the water arrives at Abbots Bridge!)

Someone further up the thread said that the fish are more active after the water is released and I was trying to determine how much longer after the water from the release reaches the various points on the river it would be need for the fish to become more active.
I have always wondered about this but due to safety reasons have never fished high water, as a guess I would
think as the river rises up the bank a lot of food would be washed in the river, if this is true the fish will know this and react to it. I would love to know what the higher stronger current does to the fish, I would think they would have to adjust their lies to get out of the heavier current for a starter but do they bite during high strong generation flows and if one could manage not getting swept into the strainer trees lining the river would one catch fish. Also Browiez is a local expert on the Hooch tailwater
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"Fly Fishing Is Not A Team Sport"----Tom McGuane

The fisherman now is one who defies society, who rips lips, who drains the pool, who takes no prisoners, who is not to be confused with the sissy with the creel and bamboo rod. Granted, he releases what he catches, but in some cases, he strips the quarry of its perilous soul before tossing it back in the water. What was once a trout – cold, hard, spotted and beautiful – becomes “number seven.”
Tom McGuane

Last edited by zug buggin; 12-13-16 at 07:44 PM.
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