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Old 12-13-16, 07:06 PM   #11
splatek16
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Yeah, I was asking more about what it does to fish: I would guess, from what I am learning about these species, that they would likely move - due to soot, high currents, low edibles, but then given their lazy nature might move back to the territory that produced. I am still learning about the fishes and whether they are territorial or not. I would bet my A** that they wild natives are...but that's just the biologist in me talking.
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Old 12-14-16, 11:08 AM   #12
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There is much rock structure in the riverbed, with many shelves across the current, so the fish have good holding structure available during high water.

High water is generally muddy. And I mean Yahoo soda muddy! Heavy rain causes the same thing.

We rely on USGS gauges for water status planning. This one is for the DH section, below Morgan Falls Dam in Roswell.
http://waterdata.usgs.gov/ga/nwis/uv...te_no=02336000

The Turbidity portion (near the bottom of the page) shows the effect of rain on Sunday, with a turbidity spike higher than the last major release from Morgan Falls LAST Wednesday.

For me, a Turbidity figure of 10 or less is fine. At 12-15, I have to hit them on the nose to get a bite.
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Old 12-14-16, 12:03 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by splatek16 View Post
Yeah, I was asking more about what it does to fish: I would guess, from what I am learning about these species, that they would likely move - due to soot, high currents, low edibles, but then given their lazy nature might move back to the territory that produced. I am still learning about the fishes and whether they are territorial or not. I would bet my A** that they wild natives are...but that's just the biologist in me talking.
Regarding the Hooch specifically, the scouring effect talked about above probably only affects/ effects the river channel the strongest directly below the dam and tailing off noticeably below Mcginnis Ferry. Proof in that would be the lengthing stretches of deep water the further you go below Mcginnis. Geology plays a part in this also as the direction of the stratification of the rock around and within the river.
The Hooch runs along the Brevard Fault of which in Georgia the majority of the rock type is a granitic gneiss. You all have seen these rocks with the dark grey bands of rock that look compressed and squiggly with bands of white quartz usually in between. Depending on which direction these compressed squiggly bands face it can erode differently because the different compositions of the rock. It also as it erodes will produce different types of sands and silt. There are a couple of true granite plutons that poke out along the river, one being bout approx. 2/3mi below Hwy.20 but those are pretty rare. A big example of a granite pluton is Stone Mountain btw. Since these also are mainly metamorphic rocks with the occasional igneous rock thrown in, they are high in silica content and low in both calcium and magnesium. Both of which are required to to provide nutrients in the stream bed and 'harden' the water. How does that affect/ effect things? Well as it was stated above, the further you go downstream, the more nutrients get added in through natural processes which means aquatic life can abound the further downstream you go, BUT there is a fine line because of the thermal issues Salmonid species face.
So that covers geology in both physical and physiological aspects regarding what lives in the river. But what about when the river rises????
Well as is common with other tailwater streams, the fish 'turn on' during releases in the Hooch. This cannot be narrowed down to just one reason, it is a plethora of factors. Lets go back and start with scouring. When a release or 'pulse' of water is released in the river it causes turbulence at varying levels in the water column as well as along the bank. Since we live in the SE, we have a ton of life on the banks of the river! Lots of bugs, small vermin, mammals get swept into the river and the cold will shock them and can leave as a high protein, high fat meal. So scouring can 'loosen up' food items on the river bottom and the shores as it rises and falls.
The other aspect to think about is territory. When the water raises, it expands the territory not only in the water column as far as cover available and new flow locations but also the territory of where food comes from. The trout are smart enough to understand that natural aquatic life is minimal and they have to take advantage of every food opportunity that comes along. Which when you are a 12-14" Brown and a couple hundred stunned rainbow trout happen to be dropped near you what are you to do?!? The fish that want to be Apex predators or Alpha fish take that next step of eating bigger prey. Currently, that number of fish is heading up as the stream population continues to mature. Proof in that is the number of large fish I have seen caught and Browniez and others have told me about being caught on the river. The question becomes though when we will hit a point within that population that numbers will start bearing out what our population can sustain both in numbers and sizes. The DNR report from a couple of years ago was a great baseline but unless more data continues to be collected we really will not have enough data to say.
Currently, my theory goes like this... Due to the geology and poor nutrient content, we will probably have a high population of fish under 10", a very high population of 11"-14" fish, a somewhat lower population of 15"-20" fish and then the 21"-30+" that are the 1-3% of the population.
This could totally be augmented and turn the Hooch into a trophy stream if a Cal-Mag limestone was added along the river at the dam by adding boulders along the wall by the dam right near the rope and distributed through that area to Bowmans, then additional boulders at Hwy20, Settles Bridge, Chattahoochee Point Park, Mcginnis Ferry, Abbott's Bridge, Medlock Bridge and Jones Bridge. It will literally take years to see the effects but it would definitely work. I have been researching stream restorations and this is right in our wheelhouse of possibilities. WOW, this post went from Lazy nature to quite involved. Poke holes in my theories gents. That is why I posted it here.
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Old 12-14-16, 12:44 PM   #14
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The short version: In general, fly fishing sucks after a release.

FM
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Old 12-14-16, 01:22 PM   #15
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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rLDgQg6bq7o

The short version: In general, fly fishing sucks after a release.

FM
I love that video! Perhaps the Hooch does not respond well fly fishing after a release but other rivers it might not be the case. What does not suck is the big browns that get caught after a release. Just caught one sunday in fact.
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Old 12-14-16, 01:51 PM   #16
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Glad you enjoyed it, I think that is one of the funniest things I have ever seen. Well, besides RScott hooking a striper, but that's another story...

Congrats on the Sunday fish

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Old 12-14-16, 02:45 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fishmonger View Post
Glad you enjoyed it, I think that is one of the funniest things I have ever seen. Well, besides RScott hooking a striper, but that's another story...

Congrats on the Sunday fish

FM
You speak of RScott hooking a striper??? Is this where his "Hooks aren't hooks" saying came from, lol???
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Old 12-14-16, 02:46 PM   #18
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Default BTW, may need to pick your brain...

Quote:
Originally Posted by fishmonger View Post
Glad you enjoyed it, I think that is one of the funniest things I have ever seen. Well, besides RScott hooking a striper, but that's another story...

Congrats on the Sunday fish

FM
I found your thread for the M.A.G.S. fly. May need some info and if you have used them on a light...
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Old 12-14-16, 03:47 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fishmonger View Post
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rLDgQg6bq7o

The short version: In general, fly fishing sucks after a release.

FM


HAHA! That's a good one.
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Old 12-14-16, 06:10 PM   #20
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Pretty awesome explanation, as I stated I know little about the natural history and biology of these fish, this river, etc, but will be doing research. Thanks.

caught a 14" bow today at settle's - the dam sucked today.
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