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Old 10-15-17, 05:18 AM   #11
Big T
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Trout management not being on the agenda can be changed I believe if pushed hard enough. Sure they are non native species and the argument that the impoundment was not designed for a trout fishery is true, but it has been decades since its creation and we have a long history of it being a trout fishery. A rare endangered trout fishery with some of the mst gorgeous wild reproducing brown trout in a major international city of over 5 million folks.

If an average home uses $150 a month in electricity or $1,800 per year times 10,000 homes that's $18mm. Keep in mind that is what we pay for electricity, they are selling to the grid for far less I imagine.

That's not a super impressive figure to me. 10,000 homes is not a big number to me. Especially when altering the schedule would not have that big of an effect on the numbers since generation would always exist at low flow.

Usually there is more to things than we know or realize and I know downstream water needs and flood control also play a part.

However, I think they could time releases in hot months to allow cold water to hit the lower end of the tailwater more frequently with a small economic impact. I also think they could combine a little sluicing at minimal flows to add oxygen at the top of the tailwater in the fall months when levels drop below state mandated minimums. Especially during brown trout reproduction times.
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Old 10-15-17, 06:56 AM   #12
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Tell them to let her rip everyday from 7 am to 9 am and 2 to 510 pm every day for the rest of forever please.
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Old 10-15-17, 08:42 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Big T View Post
Trout management not being on the agenda can be changed I believe if pushed hard enough. Sure they are non native species and the argument that the impoundment was not designed for a trout fishery is true, but it has been decades since its creation and we have a long history of it being a trout fishery. A rare endangered trout fishery with some of the mst gorgeous wild reproducing brown trout in a major international city of over 5 million folks.

If an average home uses $150 a month in electricity or $1,800 per year times 10,000 homes that's $18mm. Keep in mind that is what we pay for electricity, they are selling to the grid for far less I imagine.

That's not a super impressive figure to me. 10,000 homes is not a big number to me. Especially when altering the schedule would not have that big of an effect on the numbers since generation would always exist at low flow.

Usually there is more to things than we know or realize and I know downstream water needs and flood control also play a part.

However, I think they could time releases in hot months to allow cold water to hit the lower end of the tailwater more frequently with a small economic impact. I also think they could combine a little sluicing at minimal flows to add oxygen at the top of the tailwater in the fall months when levels drop below state mandated minimums. Especially during brown trout reproduction times.
For the record, you don't get to decide whether trout management is an operational priority of the dam and powerhouse.
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Old 10-15-17, 09:37 AM   #14
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For the record, you don't get to decide whether trout management is an operational priority of the dam and powerhouse.


I don't think that's what big t wss saying. I think, rather, he was pontificating about the various options that could satisfy power generation, power storage, and this accidental trout fishery. I've not spent much time thinking about any of this, except when it impacts my fishing. But, I could imagine a rather decent economic impact of nurturing a metropolitan trout fishery. Possibly new guide services, and general travel to ATL.
Again, I know nothing of this and think about this at a cursory level, at best...

At the very least, I think folks should at least work to keep the fishery we have by reducing pollutants and such.

That's all from me...


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Old 10-15-17, 09:54 AM   #15
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Uh... I disagree. T is correct about the hooch being a vary rare fishery. There is a case to be made for conservation
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Old 10-15-17, 10:13 AM   #16
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In 2014 the Buford Powerhouse produced 207,959 Mwh of electricity. The average home uses 10,812 kwh per year. So it provided enough power for about 19,234 homes that year. Keep in mind that power production varies every year due to various factors and can be much higher than that. I know power for 19,234 does not sound like much but that is not the real benefit. The real benefit is being a peaking power plant. That means when the grid gets stressed by higher than normal load or parts of it is down for maintenance Buford can make up the shortfall. In the worst case scenario that could prevent a brownout and you all know we don't have hardly any brownouts here. That is a testament to how efficiently electricity production and delivery is managed in our area.

I will argue that the Corps does manage for trout. I remember countless times when there were smaller water releases from the emergency sluice to increase river DO and to provide a slug of cold water to the hatchery water intakes when the river had become too warm. The COE also tries to minimize water releases in the daytime during peak visitor use times on weekends and holidays during the summer. Probably more so for public safety but fisherman benefit.

And now for the big one. The powerhouse turbines were renovated in early 2000 to provide an "auto-venting" feature that draws in oxygen to increase DO to improve water quality. So yes the COE is involved in fishery management.

I think there is a lot of misinformation or lack of information on how the Corps manages Lake Lanier. Maybe they do a poor job communicating or maybe folks don't bother to seek out information. Nevertheless, Tim Rainy the COE manager at Lanier is a member here so why not post your questions to him or give the Lake Office a call.

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Old 10-15-17, 10:17 AM   #17
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Originally Posted by Trout8myfly View Post
It's the guys who run the black helicopters. They conspire with the Illuminati who control the grid and demand electricity to power their underwater mansions.

Seriously, it's the grid. When it calls, the dam answers. Generation schedules may also link to staff availability so someone is on hand to monitor operations. But mostly it's when the wider grid needs the power. Or if the dam needs to shove water downstream.

Trout management - or to put it another way, non-native fish management - is not even on the agenda. Having a tailwater is just a bonus of the impoundment.
Also with everyone going green these days, they don't need to dump as much water to cool the reactors.
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Old 10-15-17, 10:47 AM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by splatek16 View Post
I don't think that's what big t wss saying. I think, rather, he was pontificating about the various options that could satisfy power generation, power storage, and this accidental trout fishery. I've not spent much time thinking about any of this, except when it impacts my fishing. But, I could imagine a rather decent economic impact of nurturing a metropolitan trout fishery. Possibly new guide services, and general travel to ATL.
Again, I know nothing of this and think about this at a cursory level, at best...

At the very least, I think folks should at least work to keep the fishery we have by reducing pollutants and such.

That's all from me...


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
If you could come up with an economical solution for energy storage, you would be a very rich man. As it stands, dams and hydro plants are what serve that purpose in the southeast. If you want an example of what mismanagement of energy policy gets you, look at Australia.
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Old 10-15-17, 11:34 AM   #19
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Natureman- Thanks for your insight on this post and numerous others relating to the dam and tailwaters. You help to keep us grounded in fact...

Now to rub salt in the wound. Release schedule:
2:00 Sat.
3:00 Sun
8:00 Mon.

Not everything always aligns....

Just like living with my wife, the COE is going to DO what the COE DOES. Anticipate and use to your advantage.
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Old 10-15-17, 11:36 AM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by natureman View Post
The real benefit is being a peaking power plant. That means when the grid gets stressed by higher than normal load or parts of it is down for maintenance Buford can make up the shortfall. In the worst case scenario that could prevent a brownout and you all know we don't have hardly any brownouts here. That is a testament to how efficiently electricity production and delivery is managed in our area.
Great point and well stated. Thanks.
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