NGTO Message Board
Welcome to NGTO!
Home ] [ Membership ] [ Donations ] [ Feedback ] [ Stream Reviews ] [ Stream Reports ] [ Maps ] [ Events ] [ Articles ] [ Rules and Regulations ] [ Archives ] Message Board ] FAQ ] [ Hall of Fame ] Sponsors & Supporters ] About ] [ Witticisms ] [ Distinguished Members ]
Welcome to NGTO!

Go Back   NGTO Message Board > Other NGTO Forums > Food & Cooking
Register Blogs FAQ Members List Calendar Photo Gallery Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 11-28-17, 10:10 AM   #11
JOHNKIES
Hall of Fame Member
 
Join Date: Nov 1998
Location: Laurel Park, NC USA
Posts: 6,120
Thumbs up Remarkable!

Your patience in this is remarkable. If that was in my frig half of it would be gone by now due to regular taste testings! If you don't have quite that much time, there is an Alton Brown episode where he "dry ages beef" (demonstrated with ribeye) in a couple of days. Briefly, cut the steaks, put them on an open rack and into your freezer for 24 to 48 hours. No, not quite the same but gets you there sooner. I do this with pork chops which I cut from the whole loin when on sale at Sams. For the pork I do just the 24 hours
JOHNKIES is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-28-17, 11:14 PM   #12
LureheadEd
Native
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 124
Default Looks pretty ....

The finest steaks in the world are aged in NYC totally unlike the stuff we buy at the store......Many years ago I had meat cutter buddie quit his 30 years at the A&P to start his own shop.....He cut it all, but deer season made his year....Anywhere from 1000 to 1400 is what he did...He knew meat , would only eat deer that was aged a minimum of 28 days. mostly MUCH more....

This is beautiful....I want a bite.....

Please, please , please don't pull it before you're ready....
LureheadEd is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-03-17, 11:36 PM   #13
Trouter23
Native
 
Trouter23's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 1,804
Default

Day 22:

__________________
I'm so old I remember when men wore tattoos and women wore earrings.
-Lefty Kreh
Trouter23 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-04-17, 12:22 AM   #14
troutbum69
Native
 
troutbum69's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: North of Atlanta
Posts: 1,736
Default

So as I understand it a sort of rind actually forms on the meat? Is that to be taken away before cooking? After cooking? Or eaten? I'm jealous and am thinking I may try this soon


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
__________________
"I don't hate trout fishing, just the people who trout fish."
-Our friend Nam, but secretly Ret

"Stop Whining"
troutbum69 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-04-17, 12:33 AM   #15
Trouter23
Native
 
Trouter23's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 1,804
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by troutbum69 View Post
So as I understand it a sort of rind actually forms on the meat? Is that to be taken away before cooking? After cooking? Or eaten? I'm jealous and am thinking I may try this soon


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
The outer 1/2-inch or so will get trimmed off before cooking. It'll be way too dry to sear and eat.

As far as the trimmings go, I'll usually cut them down and make a stew with them. The liquid from the stew rehydrates the trimmings.

Interestingly, something that I used to believe was true but learned otherwise, the improvement in flavor that comes from dry aging is not owing to a concentration of flavors due to the evaporation of water. The dried part gets cut off. And, as the muscle fibers on the outside dry, they also tighten, thus preventing further evaporation from deeper inside the cut. So, the effects of evaporation are in the trimmings, not really in the final product.

But, the neat thing is, as time goes on, this dried outer layer increasingly guards against rotting because, if there will be any bad bacteria that could threaten the project, it will be on the outside of the meat, not on the inside. Yet, as the outside dries, it becomes increasingly inhospitable to bacteria. So, even though it seems that the chance of rotting goes up as the dry aging process continues, it actually goes down (if it's been prepared and executed properly, i.e. cleanly).

The improved flavor and tenderization comes primarily from enzymatic and bacterial action as well as the oxidation of fat.
__________________
I'm so old I remember when men wore tattoos and women wore earrings.
-Lefty Kreh

Last edited by Trouter23; 12-04-17 at 12:58 AM.
Trouter23 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-04-17, 02:22 AM   #16
troutbum69
Native
 
troutbum69's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: North of Atlanta
Posts: 1,736
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Trouter23 View Post
The outer 1/2-inch or so will get trimmed off before cooking. It'll be way too dry to sear and eat.

As far as the trimmings go, I'll usually cut them down and make a stew with them. The liquid from the stew rehydrates the trimmings.

Interestingly, something that I used to believe was true but learned otherwise, the improvement in flavor that comes from dry aging is not owing to a concentration of flavors due to the evaporation of water. The dried part gets cut off. And, as the muscle fibers on the outside dry, they also tighten, thus preventing further evaporation from deeper inside the cut. So, the effects of evaporation are in the trimmings, not really in the final product.

But, the neat thing is, as time goes on, this dried outer layer increasingly guards against rotting because, if there will be any bad bacteria that could threaten the project, it will be on the outside of the meat, not on the inside. Yet, as the outside dries, it becomes increasingly inhospitable to bacteria. So, even though it seems that the chance of rotting goes up as the dry aging process continues, it actually goes down (if it's been prepared and executed properly, i.e. cleanly).

The improved flavor and tenderization comes primarily from enzymatic and bacterial action as well as the oxidation of fat.


So the bacteria moves outwards because it's easier? As the meat dries?

Vs

A dead animal with skin on in the woods the bacteria moves to the meat because the skin has trapped it?

I don't understand this process at all. I don't doubt it, it's clearly the most praised way of aging meat, I just don't get the science behind it. I don't have a science background but got a good break down of the science of smoking pork/beef. I'd be interested in the same thing for dry aging. If you've got a link handy. But I'd have no qualms of eating that chunk of meat. Keep the porn coming.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
__________________
"I don't hate trout fishing, just the people who trout fish."
-Our friend Nam, but secretly Ret

"Stop Whining"
troutbum69 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-04-17, 02:25 AM   #17
troutbum69
Native
 
troutbum69's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: North of Atlanta
Posts: 1,736
Default

Sorry, didn't read your whole response, things break down internally and you hope to control it to a degree as I read it?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
__________________
"I don't hate trout fishing, just the people who trout fish."
-Our friend Nam, but secretly Ret

"Stop Whining"
troutbum69 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-04-17, 06:55 AM   #18
Counslrman
Hall of Fame Member
 
Counslrman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Columbus, GA
Posts: 6,399
Default

...is this how Sparks and Spago do it...?

Blessings!

Jimmy
Counslrman is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 12-04-17, 01:31 PM   #19
THE EG
CFO, HoF Member, Director
 
THE EG's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 1999
Location: East Cherokee County, GA
Posts: 6,694
Thumbs up

Quote:
Originally Posted by troutbum69 View Post
I don't understand this process at all. I don't doubt it, it's clearly the most praised way of aging meat, I just don't get the science behind it.
It's like beer and blue cheese, the little beasties sometimes do some wonderfull things.

https://goo.gl/images/1xqorY
__________________
If this were rocket science most of us wouldn't be doing it. - Terry Creech
THE EG is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-04-17, 07:05 PM   #20
JerryG
Native
 
JerryG's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: Marietta, GA
Posts: 428
Default

Looks awesome man I can't wait to see the final product.

I've never dry aged anything but wet aged (vacuum sealed) venison tenderloin for 6 or 8 months once and it was amazing. I may actually try this on some ribeye though. There are a few Brazilian butcher shops near my house that sell it around $6/lb whole or sliced as thick as you want.

@troutbum69 To the bacteria, I always thought with beef/venison it was only airborne that you had to watch out for. That's why you can just sear a steak and be safe, but with burger where you are taking air exposed pieces and mixing it into the grind mix, it has to be cooked longer.
JerryG is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 05:57 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.2
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
vB.Sponsors
Copyright 2010 - North Georgia Trout Online - All Rights Reserved