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Old 11-30-17, 08:07 PM   #41
Dylar
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Man, I just believe you're overthinking this. The main threats to trout are heat and dirt. If you're not keeping heat and dirt out of their water, you're not doing a whole hell of a lot for trout conservation.
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Old 11-30-17, 08:37 PM   #42
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It's just a realistic view of what we can do that would have the highest chance of success with the higher ups. I mentioned in my first post the reduction of sediment finding it's way into our river would help but it's not something we can change as easily. The Hooch is located in a metropolitan area after all.

The significance of the impact is subject to further research and, as shown here, our best estimates without proper proof of the Hooch's current condition. What truly matters is actually making an impact that helps regardless of how significant one finds that impact to be. If that succeeds, working up from there.


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Old 12-04-17, 08:34 PM   #43
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If you were going to start keeping a trout or two out of the hooch tailwater, what would you keep, if your intentions were to help 'thin out the population' and therefore make less competition for the bigger fish to grow?

Brown or bow?

And what length?

I'm looking for thoughtful responses here. Not trying to impact anybody's precious brown, or 20 bow days.

In other words, if you were the DNR, what slot limit would you introduce?

And why?

Me and another forum member were discussing this recently. Another 'filter' we considered (in addition to the self-imposed slot limit above) was only keeping a fish if it it's somehow injured, like bleeding from your hook or from the fight. So say you notice a fish is hooked pretty bad, and he is a 12" brown. Bad idea to keep him? What if he were a hatchery-raised bow?

Disclaimer Naturally this isn't what the DNR actually has implemented on this river, so it's not recommended that we actually start keeping more fish. This is just postulation. Also, it could be said that there's already plenty of people keeping too big of fish / too many fish / poaching.
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Old 12-05-17, 08:59 AM   #44
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This thread is on fire

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Old 12-06-17, 08:14 AM   #45
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Yeah I think Alex intended a campfire discussion and got a bonfire instead. Hahaha still a good read every couple of days.
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Old 12-06-17, 09:45 AM   #46
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Originally Posted by Dtroutmann View Post
Yeah I think Alex intended a campfire discussion and got a bonfire instead. Hahaha still a good read every couple of days.
Please, this isn't a bonfire. Hold my beer.

The hooch isn't a natural trout fishery, so we shouldn't manage it as such. Why hinder the economic development of our region to preserve an invasive species (brown trout) when the side effects of development are more beneficial to allowing native species to gain a stronger foothold? Seems like a pretty self serving position to me.
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Old 12-06-17, 10:58 AM   #47
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Originally Posted by I_got_skunked View Post
Please, this isn't a bonfire. Hold my beer.

The hooch isn't a natural trout fishery, so we shouldn't manage it as such. Why hinder the economic development of our region to preserve an invasive species (brown trout) when the side effects of development are more beneficial to allowing native species to gain a stronger foothold? Seems like a pretty self serving position to me.
Siltation that destroys vegetation, thermal pollution, chemical runoff, and fecal matter are not good for Shoal Bass either my friend.

I wouldn't complain if the Hooch went back to its roots for a shoal bass fishery however.
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Old 12-06-17, 01:25 PM   #48
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Originally Posted by Dylar View Post
Man, I just believe you're overthinking this. The main threats to trout are heat and dirt. If you're not keeping heat and dirt out of their water, you're not doing a whole hell of a lot for trout conservation.
Which given how the dredging has completely subsided on the river it has become a problem with immense amounts of silt that are in the river and that neither Georgia Power or the state want to talk about management of silt as they say 'it's too expensive'. Lack of accountability which directly affects us the fishermen.

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Originally Posted by Sighter View Post
It's just a realistic view of what we can do that would have the highest chance of success with the higher ups. I mentioned in my first post the reduction of sediment finding it's way into our river would help but it's not something we can change as easily. The Hooch is located in a metropolitan area after all.

The significance of the impact is subject to further research and, as shown here, our best estimates without proper proof of the Hooch's current condition. What truly matters is actually making an impact that helps regardless of how significant one finds that impact to be. If that succeeds, working up from there.


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I get what you are saying. You guys have identified common factors of fishery management. Since we are armchair quarterbacking this, what are your ideas to help improve the fishery from both Dylar and Sighter? I have a couple of ideas as well and would love to hear more! In fact Dylar since you are of scientific mind you are welcome to come down and fish on my boat anytime so you can get a feel for the river! Sighter, you as well; we should attack the browns and this discussion similarly!

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Originally Posted by I_got_skunked View Post
Please, this isn't a bonfire. Hold my beer.

The hooch isn't a natural trout fishery, so we shouldn't manage it as such. Why hinder the economic development of our region to preserve an invasive species (brown trout) when the side effects of development are more beneficial to allowing native species to gain a stronger foothold? Seems like a pretty self serving position to me.
Kerosene...Because since we( state of Georgia) took the onus to manage a river by damming it it automatically throws most arguments out the window in the name of whoring out the environment as we see fit. Of course it is self serving, how much more brazen and arrogant can you be towards nature by damming a river or clear cutting a forest, both of which have happened and changed this river from what it was prior to logging and gold mining. The management resources we have are doing the best they can with what they have but if the state government cared as much about our land as they do about Hollywood's $$$ coming here then we probably would be having an entirely different discussion.

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Originally Posted by browniez View Post
Siltation that destroys vegetation, thermal pollution, chemical runoff, and fecal matter are not good for Shoal Bass either my friend.

I wouldn't complain if the Hooch went back to its roots for a shoal bass fishery however.
^^^^ THIS!!! Siltation is currently killing the river but it is the pink elephant in the room, or that is the response I have gotten when asking certain folks. Thermal pollution is on the increase for sure but compared to the siltation, I would be willing to bet that siltation is the single handed biggest enemy the Hooch fights. If they were to turn it into a shoalie fishery that would be awesome but we would still be having a similar discussion because of the need to correlate the political aspects with the monetary needs to manage a river system. Cheers to all and keep the good conversation going!
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Old 12-06-17, 03:53 PM   #49
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Quote:
Originally Posted by I_got_skunked View Post
The hooch isn't a natural trout fishery, so we shouldn't manage it as such. Why hinder the economic development of our region to preserve an invasive species (brown trout) when the side effects of development are more beneficial to allowing native species to gain a stronger foothold? Seems like a pretty self serving position to me.
If you want to manage the ecosystem for the native warm water fauna, you'd either have to remove the dam or reconstruct the powerhouse draw to pull from further up the water column. As it stands, the cold release from the dam compels management as a cold water fishery or no management at all.
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Old 12-06-17, 04:19 PM   #50
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Siltation that destroys vegetation, thermal pollution, chemical runoff, and fecal matter are not good for Shoal Bass either my friend.
Like I said, until you study it's actual impact, I wouldn't be at all sure that occasional sewage discharges aren't actually just goosing fecundity and growth rates. Hatchery effluent, treated wastewater releases and backwoods straight pipes are, in my experience, some of the most reliable indicators of exceptional trout fishing. When I'm researching a new area, one of the first things I do is look for creeks with sewage treatment discharges or private trout farms, and, all other things being equal, these will be the first areas I target for a recon mission. For that matter, an outsized percentage of my largest creek and river bass have come in the immediate downstream vicinity of sewage treatment facilities. There's no question that sewage releases can be enormously destructive under the wrong conditions, but this is usually more of a problem in warm coastal rivers that already carry an extreme nutrient load and low 0 content. A river flowing off the *** end of the Appalachian Escarpment and over a bunch of granitic bedrock very likely benefits from the nutrient boost and is unlikely to produce the algae bloom fish kills that you sometimes see further east.

Ordinary dirt in sufficient quantities, on the other hand, will kill the hell out of every trout ever born.
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