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Old 01-27-18, 11:51 AM   #41
buckman1
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sighter View Post
Looking forward to it buck! And I'm sure that was a lighthearted joke skunked, no need to take it personally. Join us on the stream sometime and we can count the number of dip cans vs granola wrappers there to settle this haha


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Yep we will go! I also need to get up with Browniez, it's just tough to get away with all these younguns!

The last time I fished Smith was at the end of September or first of October. I took my daughter, Poison Ivy. We had a very good day, with a mix of browns and bows. Had to cut the trip short because of soccer.

I've only been twice this yr, so far. Once was to the upper Toog. The river was much higher than I anticipated, and was skunked (no pun intended). Other trip was to Vogel with the squaw and seed. Caught a half dozen for supper.
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Old 01-27-18, 03:33 PM   #42
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Originally Posted by buckman1 View Post
. Once was to the upper Toog. The river was much higher than I anticipated, and was skunked (no pun intended).
If you mean the true upper Toog above the iron bridge, thatís a scary place during high water, isnít it?!
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Old 01-27-18, 04:43 PM   #43
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I'm with sighter.
A lot of debates about fishing, how to fish, what hooks, barbs vs barbless on the board. Wet a line.
Let others wet a line.
More fish pictures




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Old 01-27-18, 07:40 PM   #44
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Originally Posted by I_got_skunked View Post
Right after you pick up your deer **** beer cans, convenience store worm cups, and dip tins. Seems like a bit of a chicken and egg argument to say that our streams are too unproductive to support our fishing constituency's habits when those habits are born of unsustainable management practices. Glad to know that we can't have nice things because trout fisherman in Georgia are bigger rednecks than other states. God forbid we be subject to the boogeyman of change.
Itís all about the all mighty dollar. The vast majority of tax payers whom trout fish prefer ďput and takeĒ trout fishing. If you want trophy trout, pay an outfitter or go out west...
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Old 01-27-18, 09:26 PM   #45
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I always look at car tags when I fish. When I see a Cobb, Fulton, Clarke, or Gwinnett County tag it tells me I am safe to fish behind you, but I sure as heck don't want to get stuck behind you going up 197...

Jackson, Hall, Franklin, and Banks County usually means I can fish behind you, but the bite won't be as good. When I see a tag from Rabun, White, Habersham, or Towns County it's time to strike up a conversation to see what you're up to, then come back to the same spot next time.
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Old 01-27-18, 09:42 PM   #46
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What we can assume is that some individuals from certain areas around the .....more populated parts of the state spend vastly less time occupying, an monitoring the northeast Mountain streams. They might visit every other week, or once per month. They might not have studied Chemistry, Biology, Ecology, and Environmental Science. They might not understand how stream productivity works. How organic input works, and how trout grow and survive. They might be of the assumption that special regulations grow bigger trout, which in turn feeds their unrealized yet ever present addiction to bigger fish. The big fish syndrome. They might not realize the catastrophe that adding additional trout fingerlings will develop in the majority, if not all of our wild streams. Increased population in streams at carrying capacity, reduced food resources, stunted fish, increased potential for disease. Few folks, especially those that spend little time at all on our wild, mountain streams will understand things like productivity and carrying capacity. Most trout fishermen just want bigger fish, and don't consider that we are on the peripheral of real trout habitat which can grow good fish. Too many fishermen want to create something that can't be. If you have a horniness for big trout in abundance, you simply need to move west where you can talk on forums about the big trout on so and so popular river. If you have that horniness for big trout, and little understanding of water chemistry and productivity, you need to be fishing GA's paid operations to catch big fish. You should be satisfied. But trying to turn a small wild stream into a trophy stream where the stream cannot support it's inhabitants is negligent and irresponsible. Doing that in other parts of the country where the biology can easily support the increased biomass is perfectly fine. Doing it here in barely productive streams is not fine. Most biologists agree that harvest in brook trout streams is a healthy thing. I'd say if a man has an insatiable desire for bigger trout, he needs to put his money where his mouth is, and move to big trout country, and not attempt to manipulate the marginal peripheral of good trout habitat into something it shouldn't be. If he feels like he has the answers, and he has a degree in biology, Chemistry, or Ecology, then maybe he should spend his efforts working for our state DNR or the USFS and attempt to affect some change rather than harping about on a fruitless forum thread. Be the change.
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Old 01-27-18, 10:14 PM   #47
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Ahhh, the casting of aspersions and misstating of positions continues. I'm not sure why I would take a >50% pay cut when I can just take the ideas to their bosses. I probably won't, though, because there are much more important avenues of change to pursue.
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Old 01-27-18, 10:48 PM   #48
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Killer Kyle View Post
What we can assume is that some individuals from certain areas around the .....more populated parts of the state spend vastly less time occupying, an monitoring the northeast Mountain streams. They might visit every other week, or once per month. They might not have studied Chemistry, Biology, Ecology, and Environmental Science. They might not understand how stream productivity works. How organic input works, and how trout grow and survive. They might be of the assumption that special regulations grow bigger trout, which in turn feeds their unrealized yet ever present addiction to bigger fish. The big fish syndrome. They might not realize the catastrophe that adding additional trout fingerlings will develop in the majority, if not all of our wild streams. Increased population in streams at carrying capacity, reduced food resources, stunted fish, increased potential for disease. Few folks, especially those that spend little time at all on our wild, mountain streams will understand things like productivity and carrying capacity. Most trout fishermen just want bigger fish, and don't consider that we are on the peripheral of real trout habitat which can grow good fish. Too many fishermen want to create something that can't be. If you have a horniness for big trout in abundance, you simply need to move west where you can talk on forums about the big trout on so and so popular river. If you have that horniness for big trout, and little understanding of water chemistry and productivity, you need to be fishing GA's paid operations to catch big fish. You should be satisfied. But trying to turn a small wild stream into a trophy stream where the stream cannot support it's inhabitants is negligent and irresponsible. Doing that in other parts of the country where the biology can easily support the increased biomass is perfectly fine. Doing it here in barely productive streams is not fine. Most biologists agree that harvest in brook trout streams is a healthy thing. I'd say if a man has an insatiable desire for bigger trout, he needs to put his money where his mouth is, and move to big trout country, and not attempt to manipulate the marginal peripheral of good trout habitat into something it shouldn't be. If he feels like he has the answers, and he has a degree in biology, Chemistry, or Ecology, then maybe he should spend his efforts working for our state DNR or the USFS and attempt to affect some change rather than harping about on a fruitless forum thread. Be the change.
Excellent post!
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Old 01-27-18, 10:55 PM   #49
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As someone who's been fishing for under 2 years and became instantly hooked when I was introduced to the Chattahoochee, I've always felt like people are too unwilling to share anything about the waters they fish. I mean sure, in a way I understand, you don't want the waters you fish to be fished by anyone more than you (joke). This post mentions an extremely popular creek and people start arguing.

I wanted to fish new places after months on the Chattahoochee and starting looking for creeks on every website I could find recommendations for. The DNR website is a blessing. I've fished wildcat, rock, cooper, dicks, and some other rivers in the area. Once spring comes around, I'll pull out the DNR maps and stocking lists, and look for more.

I have found maybe one trout fisherman so far, in all my time fishing, who's been willing suggest a location to fish. That's kind of discouraging. For a community that's fairly friendly, trout fisherman are also very suppressing of help when it comes to fishing something new (Maybe people don't take younger fisherman seriously?). Everyone and their mother has """secret""" spots that no ears must hear. Back to the maps!
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Old 01-27-18, 11:02 PM   #50
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fishinbub View Post
I always look at car tags when I fish. When I see a Cobb, Fulton, Clarke, or Gwinnett County tag it tells me I am safe to fish behind you, but I sure as heck don't want to get stuck behind you going up 197...

Jackson, Hall, Franklin, and Banks County usually means I can fish behind you, but the bite won't be as good. When I see a tag from Rabun, White, Habersham, or Towns County it's time to strike up a conversation to see what you're up to, then come back to the same spot next time.
What about a car tag from Educator County?
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