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Old 04-07-10, 10:19 AM   #11
UGAflyfisher
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tboy View Post
Thanks for the info! Been interested in this stuff for a long time. I know many of us are grateful for your initiative to educate.

I am trying to build a small collection of preserved specimens for teaching purposes. Are there any books you would suggest for learning how to id and categorize down to a specific species?


tboy,

I would like to say there is an easy way to ID insects down to species but there isn't usually. I actually cringed when you said species and as being a trained entomologist have trouble getting some insects down to the family level. Aquatic insects should be easier but I think they have the same revision problems that all insects face. How do we put a label on something that isn't easily labeled.

Also, in most insect taxonomy books ID is based on adult characteristics and many species can't be ID from the immatures. For example after a quick review of Aquatic Insects in California. (Usinger, 1971) most Caddisfly ID comes from a microscopic look at the adult male genitalia. I'm sure there are easier and more complete keys now but they are probably based on those characteristics. Immature insect taxonomy is definitely muddy water IMHO but I think there are texts that would at least get you down to family. I will have to look in the literature to find those texts because I'm not an aquatic entomologist. Even the insect that I work on (whitefly, B. tabaci) which is a huge economic pest all around the world has had major revisions within the last 20 years. I've sat in many different scientific lectures debating whether or not this whitefly is this species or that. I'm sure the aquatic guys do the same thing.

To start off I would recommend picking up:

http://www.amazon.com/Anglers-Aquati...9891879&sr=1-1


I use it often and would be a good starting point on your quest to learn more about aquatic insects. It also talks fishing strategy and techniques. I'm not sure why it's so expensive right now though. Maybe it's out of print?

I'll do some digging and see if I can't come up with any more texts for you.




Shine

Last edited by UGAflyfisher; 04-07-10 at 01:35 PM.
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Old 04-16-10, 04:50 PM   #12
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Default Arrrrrrgh-----

Haven't got any hair left to pull out after study of "bugs". Will stick w/ big / little yellow bug----big / little brown bug way of choosing flys, but thanks for doing this for the folks that will use it. TRW
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Old 04-16-10, 07:36 PM   #13
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Ah... I was wondering if that goal was achievable. Guess I'll go as far as I can find. Thx for the book info! This will be an interesting study for the rest of this semester. I have been picking up some bugs every time im out fishing and keeping them in rubbing alcohol till i get the right stuff to preserve them better. Hopefully I can ID them decently with some practice! its just for fun anyhow.
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Old 04-16-10, 11:18 PM   #14
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Keep going as far as you can. It's a fun process. I know I enjoy it. Just don't get discouraged over exact ID. It's a swift kick in the you know what.


Shine
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Old 05-21-10, 12:10 PM   #15
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I have been borrowing the book you suggested from a friend, I also came across a great in-depth guide to identifying and classifying aquatic insects. Chris Scalley let me borrow this one (its one of those books that cost 120 bones new) called Aquatic Entomology by W. Patrick McCaffery. great book for both the entomologist and fisherman. I do believe it is used as a text book as well...
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Old 10-30-10, 09:09 AM   #16
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Keep Watkins advice to heart. As a student of entomology both professionally and recreationally, I can tell you to study the size, shape and color of successful fly patterns as well. There is a reason trout all over the planet eat Adams, Elk hairs and woolly buggers. They look like food.
Saltwater flyfidhing taught me how much I could "lean" on monofilament leaders before they would break.
Freshwater bass fishing taught me that changing a lure from light to dark (or vice versa) can make the day.
You'll have to ask me some day how a tree guy (me) figured out which trees to fish under, what time of year and what fly.
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Old 11-23-10, 07:31 PM   #17
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Default Bugs Beginners

"Bugs for Beginners" with Jay Buchner, is a pretty good introduction to entomology for fly fishers. I bought mine, but you can get it on Netflix.
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Old 04-11-11, 01:33 PM   #18
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This is great conversation. I have spent many an hour on wikipedia looking at bugs and always walked away with a very small amount of new knowledge and a big headache. A quick reference card would be outstanding but do we really need to know what bug we are looking at just to pick a fly that looks like it? It is of course by no means useless information, if you know what you have you can look up seasonal information and all that to help you out. I look forward to more lessons on this subject.

Thanks Shine,
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Old 04-12-11, 10:23 AM   #19
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My quest this summer is to begin to understand the bug cycle. I am one of those fishermen who just guess and cast. I know alot of us out there.
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Old 04-30-12, 12:16 AM   #20
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Default out of curiousity....

What did you major in at UGA?? Was wondering if you were either an ecology major or fisheries major. I was a fisheries major at the Warnell school which is why I asked...

Tight lines,

Joshua
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