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Old 03-22-11, 10:05 AM   #31
narcodog
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If that was a Red Wolf it would be tagged with an electric transponder like they do with wolves in the west. If you read on Wikipedia you will get a better understanding of the red wolf in NC.

That is a Coyote, they kill calves, dogs along with wildlife. They harbor other diseases that spread to humans and other animals. Kill'um they are vermin... The DNR does not have them protected for a reason.

I had a flock of turkey's around my place, now I don't. My neighbor raises quail and such so you city slickers can come shoot them, some don't get shot, they don't last a day until the coyotes get them.

I'll add this what if snake heads were discovered in the Hooch or Toccoa then what would you say?
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Old 03-22-11, 10:09 AM   #32
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glad to see the guy (yote) got some others support. With regards to rabies, in Alabama the state drops vaccine from the air in tasty treat form for the coons and such, my Blue Heeler just loves to find those in the woods. I believe she was vaccinated about 4 times last year. Vet said she'd be fine
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Old 03-22-11, 10:17 AM   #33
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Nobody is ever going to eradicate coyotes. We are their only predators. The species is pretty safe so killing one or two a year is not going to affect the overall population much.

The thing with coyotes is that they are very elusive and very difficult to hunt. They get wise to any kind of calling or even baiting methods and once they are called once or twice, they won't fall for it again. The only way I really ever kill them is just happening to see them while deer hunting. They are extremely adaptable to all sorts of environments. I don't know anyone who kills "a lot" of coyotes every year here in Georgia.

The good thing is that coyotes do not proliferate at an very fast rate. Their litters are fairly small, they can't reproduce until they are 2 years old typically, and, in a pack, only the alpha male gets to breed. The females only come into season once a year and only for about 10 days. So they are like the anti-feral hog.

Even so, there are a lot of coyotes in Georgia now. They are in suburban and even urban settings. My old boss would routinely hear them yapping from his home in Brookwood Hills (between Midtown and Buckhead) near Peachtree Creek.
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Old 03-22-11, 11:07 AM   #34
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Buck Henry View Post
You will be hard pressed to convince me that we have a deer shortage here in Georgia due to Coyotes! How many deer can you kill on a tag in Georgia; 10 or has it gone up even higher since the last time I checked?

PS: and they may not be an original native, but they are now!
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Originally Posted by Mogogo View Post
I'm with Buck, I don't get why the coyote should be eradicated out of wild areas. What would happen to our membership if we did away with every deer and turkey slayer?
Too, rainbow and brown trout are not native. Should we do away with them as well?

They said the same thing about introducing wolves out west. They've put a huge hurtin on elk, moose, sheep and livestock.

I've also seen the same with wolves in Wisconsin on our property there.
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Old 03-22-11, 12:11 PM   #35
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They said the same thing about introducing wolves out west. They've put a huge hurtin on elk, moose, sheep and livestock.

I've also seen the same with wolves in Wisconsin on our property there.
Northwestern Montana has at least twice as many cougars as wolves and twice as many grizzly bears. Together they kill more adult deer and fawns than wolves do. Coyotes and black bears take a share as well. On top of that, the area has had two tough winters in a row. Deer totals dropped even where few predators prowl. Yet overall deer numbers remain within the historical average. For that matter, both elk and deer are doing well across the West. As game manager Jim Williams puts it, "With wolves back in the picture along with cougars and bears, we'll have places where elk and deer may never be as abundant again as people remember, and we'll have other places where they'll do fine. There are bigger drivers than wolves in these systems." Studies have shown that winter weather and the quality of wintering habitat are really what control deer and elk populations over time. That and human hunting. out of National Geographic, hmm
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Old 03-22-11, 12:53 PM   #36
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Northwestern Montana has at least twice as many cougars as wolves and twice as many grizzly bears. Together they kill more adult deer and fawns than wolves do. Coyotes and black bears take a share as well. On top of that, the area has had two tough winters in a row. Deer totals dropped even where few predators prowl. Yet overall deer numbers remain within the historical average. For that matter, both elk and deer are doing well across the West. As game manager Jim Williams puts it, "With wolves back in the picture along with cougars and bears, we'll have places where elk and deer may never be as abundant again as people remember, and we'll have other places where they'll do fine. There are bigger drivers than wolves in these systems." Studies have shown that winter weather and the quality of wintering habitat are really what control deer and elk populations over time. That and human hunting. out of National Geographic, hmm
I would like to see you post this on westfly and then talk to the folks around the Big Hole. I think you will get a completely different story.
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Old 03-22-11, 01:09 PM   #37
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there is always 2 sides or more and if I had sheep I'd probably on the other side of this one. You can copy and post if you like.
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Old 03-22-11, 04:20 PM   #38
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Buck Henry View Post
You will be hard pressed to convince me that we have a deer shortage here in Georgia due to Coyotes! How many deer can you kill on a tag in Georgia; 10 or has it gone up even higher since the last time I checked?

PS: and they may not be an original native, but they are now!
Clark, no one said we had a shortage of deer due to coyotes.

What we do have is a non-native species (the coyote) which is very adapt at taking fawns. Do some research on the internet and you'll find a study done in South Carolina documenting the impact of coyotes on fawns.

I personally observe a lot of wildlife from the tree stand. This past deer season (before it cut short for me) I saw only one doe with a fawn on my lease in Oglethorpe Co. With the one exception, all of the does I saw had no fawns where a healthy doe will normally have one or two fawns. We do, in fact, have a very large population of coyotes on the lease based upon sightings, sign, and vocalazation.

Btw, the deer herd in Georgia has declined from the time when the 12 deer limit (2 bucks and 10 dies) was implemented. There are a number of reasons for this.....fawn depredation from coyotes is only one of the reasons.
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Old 03-22-11, 04:24 PM   #39
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Originally Posted by Mogogo View Post
I'm with Buck, I don't get why the coyote should be eradicated out of wild areas. What would happen to our membership if we did away with every deer and turkey slayer?
Too, rainbow and brown trout are not native. Should we do away with them as well?
Mogogo, I assume your comment was directed to my post.

No where did I mention eradication. As a crafty, noctural animal I don't beleive it would be possible to eradicate coyotes.

I do believe, and am backed up through studies, the coyote has an adverse effect on our native game and birds.

I stand by my comment.....coyotes don't get a pass from me.
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Old 03-22-11, 05:06 PM   #40
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Default GON article from 2006

http://www.gon.com/article.php?id=347

This is a good read from five years ago. You might pick up on a thing or two about yotes and deer.
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